Posts Tagged ‘Romans 8:35’

Nothing can separate us

February 18, 2018

Yesterday’s Verse of the Day introduced a series of questions raised in Romans 8: beginning with verse 35:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?

The Verse of the Day for February 18, 2018  responds to that series of questions:

Romans 8:38-39 (NIV):

For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Despite the adverse circumstances of life that seek to negatively impact our relationship with God and cause us to question whether He really loves us, Paul offers this blessed assurance: Simply put, nothing can separate us from the love of God:

Beginning with death, the end of life, not even life itself can separate us;

Neither legions upon legions of angelic entities nor powers, neither all the demonic forces that follow the commands of “him who has the power of death—that is the devil”;

Nothing in this present life nor in the life to come; Nothing is higher than the love of God which reaches beyond the highest height and lowest hell; “There is no pit so deep that God is not deeper still.”

Since God who is love created all things, then no created thing is outside the love of God. Nothing—literally “no thing”– shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

As we think about these verses, 1 Corinthians 13 also comes to mind, relating to the constancy of the love of God which never fails:

Nothing can separate us

Three things will last forever—faith, hope, and love
–and the greatest of these is love.
1 Corinthians 13:13 (New Living Translation)

Father, expand our minds and widen our comprehension
To recognize Your ways at an even greater dimension.
As we call upon Your name and bow in humility,
Striving to be all that You have called us to be,
Enlighten our eyes, strengthen our hearts to endure,
As we walk in the love of God, boundless and pure.
When we are tempted, knowing that You love us dispels all fear.
As we seek to please You, open our ears that we might hear
Your word and endeavor to hide it deep within our heart.
Despite past failures, misdeeds, and shortcomings on our part,
Your love is constant, never changing that we might know
The fullness of such love abounding in us as we grow,
For we walk by faith, rest in hope, looking above,
Assured nothing can separate us from God’s love

This powerful musical rendering of Romans 8:35, 37-38 by Wayne Tate raises the question and offers the answer expressed in the Verse of the Day:

More than conquerors: What does it mean?

February 17, 2018

Verse of the Day for February 17, 2018 introduces a series of questions raised in Romans 8: beginning with verse 35, followed by verse 37 in the New International Version:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall trouble or hardship or persecution or famine or nakedness or danger or sword? No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.

Here is the rendering in the New King James Version:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us.

If we add verse 36, we note a series of questions expressed this way in the Amplified Bible, Classic Edition:

35 Who shall ever separate us from Christ’s love? Shall suffering and affliction and tribulation? Or calamity and distress? Or persecution or hunger or destitution or peril or sword?
36 Who is there to condemn [us]? Will Christ Jesus (the Messiah), Who died, or rather Who was raised from the dead, Who is at the right hand of God actually pleading as He intercedes for us?

The passage culminates with a powerful response that thunders with the answer to this barrage of questions. The answer is more emphatic in other translations which begin with “No!” The familiar King James Version declares:

Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him that loved us.

The Phillips Translation puts it this way:

No, in all these things we win an overwhelming victory through him who has proved his love for us:

So says the New Living Translation:

No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us.

The response is definite and emphatic: No, absolutely not! No way, Jose! No! [Expletive deleted—No!] Paul goes on to close out this section to remind believers of who we are and whose we are and most importantly what we do:

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors and gain an overwhelming victory through Him who loved us [so much that He died for us].

The expression “more than conquerors” is translated from the Greek verb hupernikao, a compound word with the prefix huper—a form of the same prefix found in “super”—meaning over, beyond, above exceed, more than. Today, common expressions of the preposition would say “over and above” or “above and beyond.” The stem would be nikao, translated “to conquer, prevail, overcome, overpower, prevail.” Although translated as such, being “more than conquerors” or “super conquerors,” is not who we are, but it is what we do, how we live. We prevail completely in the present tense with continuous action; we prevail mightily every day of our lives: “In all these things we overwhelmingly conquer through Him who loved us.”

Romans 8:37 is the epigraph or introduction for this expression of our new identity in light of the Word for the Day:

Not Just Survivors

Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors
and gain an overwhelming victory through Him
who loved us [so much that He died for us].
Romans 8:37 (AMP)

Not just survivors, more than conquerors,
Defying the odds as brave conquistadors.
Despite intense pressure we learn to rest in grace,
More than enough to withstand the daily tests we face,
Not merely to survive but to thrive even more.

As mighty warriors, triumphant super victors
With a cause, prepared not to die but to live for.
At times we fell behind but fought to keep the pace:
Not just survivors, more than conquerors.
.

To fulfill all the will of God and then to soar
To heights sublime where we have never been before.
Overcomers, bearing light in the darkest place,
We still fight the good fight, as we finish our race,
Moving forward, seeking to find the next open door:
Not just survivors, more than conquerors.

The perfect music to accompany the Verse of the Day is “More than Conquerors” by the Rend Collection:

Nothing can separate us

February 18, 2017

romans-8-38-39

Yesterday’s Verse of the Day introduced a series of questions raised in Romans 8: beginning with verse 35:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?

The Verse of the Day for February 18, 2017 is the culminating response to that series of questions:

Romans 8:38-39:

For I am persuaded that neither death nor life, nor angels nor principalities nor powers, nor things present nor things to come, nor height nor depth, nor any other created thing, shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Despite the adverse circumstances of life that seek to negatively impact our relationship with God and cause us to question whether He really loves us, Paul offers this blessed assurance: Simply put, nothing can separate us from the love of God:

Beginning with death, the end of life, nor life itself can separate us;

Neither legions upon legions of angelic entities nor powers, neither all the demonic forces that follow the commands of “him who has the power of death—that is the devil”;

Nothing in this present life nor in the life to come;

Nothing is higher than the love of God which reaches beyond the highest height and lowest hell; “There is no pit so deep that God is not deeper still.”

Since God who is love created all things, then no created thing is outside the love of God. Nothing—literally “no thing”– shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Amen and Amen.

This powerful musical rendering of Romans 8:35, 37-38 by Wayne Tate raises the question and offers the answer expressed in the Verse of the Day.

 

No, we overwhelmingly conquer

February 17, 2017

Romans 8--37

Verse of the Day for February 17, 2017 comes from a personal favorite passage found in Romans 8:35, 37 in the New King James Version:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us.

If we add verse 36, we note a series of questions expressed this way in the Amplified Bible, Classic Edition:

35 Who shall ever separate us from Christ’s love? Shall suffering and affliction and tribulation? Or calamity and distress? Or persecution or hunger or destitution or peril or sword?

36 Who is there to condemn [us]? Will Christ Jesus (the Messiah), Who died, or rather Who was raised from the dead, Who is at the right hand of God actually pleading as He intercedes for us?

The passage culminates with a powerful response that thunders with the answer to this barrage of questions. The answer is more emphatic in other translations which begin with “No!” The familiar King James Version declares:

Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him that loved us.

The Phillips Translation puts it this way:

No, in all these things we win an overwhelming victory through him who has proved his love for us:

So says the New Living Translation:

37 No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us.

The response is definite and emphatic: No, absolutely not! No way, Jose! No! [Expletive deleted—No!] Paul goes on to close out this section to remind believers of who we are and whose we are and most importantly what we do:

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

37 Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors and gain an overwhelming victory through Him who loved us [so much that He died for us].

The expression “more than conquerors” is translated from the Greek verb hupernikao, a compound word with the prefix huper—a form of the same prefix found in “super”—meaning over, beyond, above exceed, more than. Today, common expressions of the preposition would say “over and above” or “above and beyond.” The stem would be nikao, translated “to conquer, prevail, overcome, overpower, prevail.”  Although translated as such, being “more than conquerors” or “super conquerors,” is not who we are, but it is what we do, how we live. We prevail completely in the present tense with continuous action; we prevail mightily every day of our lives: “In all these things we overwhelmingly conquer through Him who loved us.”

Wayne Tate offers this powerful declaration found in Romans 8:35, 37-39:

More than conquerors

February 17, 2016

Romans 8--37

Verse of the Day for February 17, 2016 comes from Romans 8:35, 37 in the Amplified Bible:

Who shall ever separate us from the love of Christ? Will tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors and gain an overwhelming victory through Him who loved us [so much that He died for us].

To more fully recognize the impact of these verses, we need to examine Romans 8:31-36 (NLT) before we look at verse 37:

31 What shall we say about such wonderful things as these? If God is for us, who can ever be against us? 32 Since he did not spare even his own Son but gave him up for us all, won’t he also give us everything else? 33 Who dares accuse us whom God has chosen for his own? No one—for God himself has given us right standing with himself. 34 Who then will condemn us? No one—for Christ Jesus died for us and was raised to life for us, and he is sitting in the place of honor at God’s right hand, pleading for us.
35 Can anything ever separate us from Christ’s love? Does it mean he no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger, or threatened with death? 36 (As the Scriptures say, “For your sake we are killed every day; we are being slaughtered like sheep.”

The passage comes from a section of Romans 8 emphasizing that there is “no separation in Christ” and that nothing can separate us from his love. These scriptures are presented as a barrage of questions culminating with a powerful response that thunders with the answer:

Romans 8:37

37 No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us.

The response is definite and emphatic: absolutely not! No way, Jose! No! [Expletive deleted—No!] “Overwhelming victory is ours,” the phrase that follows, is translated from the verb hupernikao. Using a verb indicates that in the midst of the most staggering, adverse circumstances that seek to limit or inhibit us or separate us from Christ who loved us, we conquer more and more as “super-conquerors,” achieving “overwhelming victory.”

From a recent blog entry “We choose to love” come the following comments on this passage from Romans 8 relating to the constancy of the love of God which never fails:

No matter the circumstances of our lives, whether on the pinnacles of success and dreams come true or in the pits of disappointment and failure, we are assured that God loves us and that His love endures. I recall a statement from the late Dr. Adrian Rodgers of Love Worth Finding Ministries: “God cannot love us any more than He does, and He will not love us any less.”

We find great assurance in comfort in the midst of the most distressing and oppressive times in which we live that nothing can separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus, our Lord.

We are encouraged by this powerful video from the Rend Collective who remind us that “We are More than Conquerors”:

From failure to success: another view

November 23, 2009

This morning I happened to come across a blog entry originally posted more than five years ago. As I read the comments that seemed custom-crafted just for me at this present time, I felt like David, who encouraged himself in the Word of the Lord. I thought this entry might also be a source of encouragement to others as well, and so I am re-posting this discussion of the term “failure,” as viewed from a different perspective. This two-part entry is based on Romans 8:35, 37:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?

Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us.

The journey continues--ever upward toward the light

Part 1

Many times as I go through life and encounter situations that I do not totally understand, I will from time to time write down my thoughts while endeavoring to process the experience that I am going through. After some serious consideration, I have changed my thinking from accepting the duality of “either/or” to embracing concept of “both/and.” In the process I have gone from the designation of being a “total failure” to “not being as successful” as I would like to have been in certain categories.

I think of the lyrics to a powerful song called “Lessons to be Learned”:

Why did that right road take that wrong turn?
Why did our heart break, and why did we get burned?
Just like the seasons there are reasons for the path we take:
There are no mistakes, just lessons to be learned.

What are the lessons God is teaching me during this season of my life? I am a life-long learner, an ever-eager student in the University of Life, and I am continually learning more about God and my relationship with Him. For me, one of the verses that I so often share has become more than just a cliché. Romans 8:28 for me is “life verse”, a constant reminder that God is good and that all things work together for the good, no matter the circumstances.

Romans 8:28

And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose.

In the minds of many I am a failure. . . Does it really matter what “people say”?

Here is an-mail that I received that I will include at this point. Most providentially I received this email at a time when I was asking this very question in terms of my own perceived shortcomings.

What is failure?
________________________________________
Failure doesn’t mean that you are a failure;
it does mean you haven’t yet succeeded.

Failure doesn’t mean that you have accomplished nothing;
it does mean you have learned something.

Failure doesn’t mean that you have been a fool;
it does mean you have a lot of faith.

Failure doesn’t mean that you have been disgraced;
it does mean you were willing to try.

Failure doesn’t mean you don’t have it;
it does mean you have to do something in a different way.

Failure doesn’t mean you are inferior;
it does mean you are not perfect.

Failure doesn’t mean you’ve wasted your life;
it does mean you have a reason to start afresh.

Failure doesn’t mean you should give up;
it does mean you must try harder.

Failure doesn’t mean you will never make it;
it does mean it will take a little longer.

Failure doesn’t mean God has abandoned you;
it does mean God has a better way.

Author unknown
________________________________________

The Living Word Library © 1996 – 2008
editor@wordlibrary.co.uk

The last line of the statement about failure brings to mind this poem:

We Pray—God Answers

Therefore I say to you, whatever things you ask when you pray,
believe that you receive them, and you will have them.
Mark 11:24

We pray, asking to receive and seeking to find.
If we knock, the door shall be opened all our days,
For God answers prayer in one of three sovereign ways:

Sometimes we pray and find that the answer is “yes.”

In Christ each promise is “yes” and “amen”,
For God is not a man that He should lie.
He has already spoken—What shall we say then
But give thanks, for when we call Him, He hears each cry.

Other times we find that the answer is “not yet.”

We need more patience so that after we have done
All the will of God, as sons we might be instilled
With confident assurance given to each one,
Set as an empty vessel, yet to be fulfilled.

Or God may say, “I have something better in mind.”

Before we abandon hope, feeling left behind,
Though it may seem we cannot pass another test,
But if we stop and think a moment, we will find
God, our all-wise Father, really knows what is best.

Part 2

Success and its antonym, failure, are connected in this definition which introduces the last stanza of a familiar poem of great inspiration entitled “Don’t Quit.”

Success is failure turned inside out—
The silver tint of the clouds of doubt,

Here is a video adaptation of the words of this popular poem:

As I was thinking about the entire subject of failure and success, another poem came to mind, a very penetrating expression of the view of life through the eyes of the noted 19th Century poet, Emily Dickinson, who wrote these words:

Success is counted sweetest
By those who ne’er succeed.
To comprehend a nectar
Requires sorest need.

In response, I wrote this poem to express my view regarding success in light of those who fail to achieve it:

I Have Sipped a Sweetness

Do you not know that in a race all the runners compete,
but [only] one receives the prize? So run [your race]
that you may lay hold [of the prize] and make it yours.

Now every athlete who goes into training
conducts himself temperately and restricts himself in all things.
They do it to win a wreath that will soon wither,
but we [do it to receive a crown of eternal blessedness]
that cannot wither.
1 Corinthians 9:24-25 Amplified Bible

Said the fragile lady who never knew such bliss,
“Success is counted sweetest by those who ne’er succeed.”
In her enigmatic style went on to say this:
“To comprehend a nectar requires sorest need.”
Said the dark poet of another time and place,
I have sipped a sweetness beyond any honey,
The rush in the blood of the one who wins his race,
A foretaste of the glory to come that inspires
Self discipline to sublimate carnal desires,
Casting aside every weight, each besetting sin,
I press toward the mark, the prize now set before me
And run with patience the race I’m destined to win.
Then shall I know ultimate ecstasy of victory
And savor God’s goodness for all eternity.

In closing, let me make this final statement about what appears to be failure. I’m sure that if we scrutinized our lives closely we could easily be overcome by a sense of failure in light of the circumstances that surround us. We can take courage and be strengthened, however, by the example of someone whose life ended most tragically without apparent accomplishment of his mission. He died a shameful death, and those who believed in him, deserted him. Yes, Jesus Christ, in the eyes of the world was a disastrous failure at the end of his life. However, we know “the rest of the story,” and I am writing these words of exhortation to you because of his triumph over the worst possible circumstances—even death itself. Because he was a super-conqueror, in all these things we are more than conquerors.

So take heart, my brothers and sisters, and be encouraged. The best is always yet to come. So we must take heart and remember that when we experience what seems to be failure, that “a set-back is just a set-up for a comeback.”

I also take comfort in the timeless universal truth that “This too shall pass.” This expression is set to music and rendered in a most inspiring manner, as Yolanda Adams reminds us: