Posts Tagged ‘Romans 15:2’

For the good of your neighbor

May 23, 2016

Romans 15--2

The Verse of the Day for May 23, 2016 encourages believers to be concerned about the welfare of others:

Romans 15:2 (AMP):

Let each one of us make it a practice to please (make happy) his neighbor for his good and for his true welfare, to edify him [to strengthen him and build him up spiritually].

The Verse of the Day brings to mind a similar expression regarding how one should behave toward one’s neighbor and that is “to do good” to those who whom we encounter.  Throughout the Scriptures we find references that encourage believers as to how they should behave. Here are two illustrations from the Psalms of David:

Psalm 34:14 (AMP)

Turn away from evil and do good; Seek peace and pursue it.

Psalm 37:3

Trust [rely on and have confidence] in the Lord and do good; Dwell in the land and feed [securely] on His faithfulness.

Proverbs 14:22 (NLT) makes clear that those who choose to “do evil” or “to do good” will be rewarded accordingly:

If you plan to do evil, you will be lost; if you plan to do good, you will receive unfailing love and faithfulness

In the Gospels the Lord Jesus Christ encouraged his followers to “do good,” even to one’s enemies:

Luke 6:27 (AMP):

But I say to you who hear [Me and pay attention to My words]: Love [that is, unselfishly seek the best or higher good for] your enemies, [make it a practice to] do good to those who hate you,

Luke 6:35 (AMP):

But love [that is, unselfishly seek the best or higher good for] your enemies, and do good, and lend, expecting nothing in return; for your reward will be great (rich, abundant), and you will be sons of the Most High; because He Himself is kind and gracious and good to the ungrateful and the wicked.

Galatians 6:10 (AMP) offer this sound advice:

So then, while we [as individual believers] have the opportunity, let us do good to all people [not only being helpful, but also doing that which promotes their spiritual well-being], and especially [be a blessing] to those of the household of faith (born-again believers).

1 Thessalonians 5:15 reinforces this message:

See that no one pays back evil for evil, but always try to do good to each other and to all people.

The exhortation “to do good” also brings to mind the sage advice of John Wesley:

“Do all the good you can. By all the means you can. In all the ways you can. In all the places you can. At all the times you can. To all the people you can. As long as ever you can.”

The musical group Commissioned closes our comments with this reminder that in all that we do “Only What You Do for Christ Will Last.”

What we are supposed to do

May 23, 2015

Romans_15-2Romans 15:2 (New Living Testament, the Verse of the Day for May 23, 2015, makes known what are we supposed to do as Christian believers:

We should help others do what is right and build them up in the Lord.

We find a similar exhortation in 1 Corinthians 10:33 (NLT):

I, too, try to please everyone in everything I do. I don’t just do what is best for me; I do what is best for others so that many may be saved.

Theses verses also bring to mind Micah 6:8 which asks a probing question in the King James Version:

He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?

The New Living Translation renders the verse as this powerful statement:

No, O people, the Lord has told you what is good,
and this is what he requires of you:
to do what is right, to love mercy,
and to walk humbly with your God.

The following excerpt comes from a blog entry devoted to Micah 6:8 which provides a discussion of three simple requirements, three prerequisites for Godly living expressed in three verbs written as infinitives: to do, to love, and to walk.

Here are references as to what we are “to do”:

To do . . .

This verb brings to mind a similar exhortation from Galatians 6:10:

As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith.

We have a choice to do good or to do evil, but the Word of God reminds us that despite the sinful nature of humanity, our ultimate purpose is to do good:

Ecclesiastes 3:12:

I know that there is no good in them, but for a man to rejoice, and to do good in his life.

This reminder to do justly or to “do good” is echoed in the words of John Wesley, who said:

“Do all the good you can. By all the means you can. In all the ways you can. In all the places you can. At all the times you can. To all the people you can. As long as ever you can.”

Ecclesiastes 9:10 (NLT) offers this sobering reminder:

Whatever you do, do well. For when you go to the grave, there will be no work or planning or knowledge or wisdom.

Colossians 3:23 also provides the standard by which we should measure whatever we do:

Work willingly at whatever you do, as though you were working for the Lord rather than for people.

A scripture memory song of Colossians 3:23-24 in the King James Version puts it this way:

And whatsoever you do, do it heartily as to the Lord,

Knowing that of the Lord, you shall receive your reward.

Whatever your hands find to do, do it with all your might.

Knowing that of the Lord, you shall receive your reward.

For you serve the Lord Jesus Christ.

For you serve the Lord Jesus Christ.

The overall expectations that God has for His people seem simple enough: Like the Nike slogan states, we should: “Just do it!” In actuality, “There’s nothing to it but to do it!” We close with this poetic reminder not to procrastinate but to

Do It Now!

Redeeming the time, because the days are evil.

Therefore be ye not unwise, but understanding

what the will of the Lord is.

Ephesians 5:15-16

If you want to live each minute

With the fullest measure in it,

To run your best race and win it

Then start to do it now!

Don’t wait until it’s tomorrow

To look for the time to borrow,

For you may be filled with sorrow

Unless you do it now!

Don’t wait until the time is right.

By then you may have long lost sight

Of work to do with all your might.

Be sure to do it now!

Make up your mind; don’t hesitate.

Now is the time to act, don’t wait.

You’ve got nothing to lose; go straight

Ahead and do it now!

Just put the past behind somehow

And with each moment make a vow:

Now is the time to do it now.

Get up and do it now!

Listen to a musical rendering of Micah 6:8 offered by Maranatha! Singers:

Receive one another

September 22, 2014

Romans 15--7

In the verses preceding the Verse of the Day for September 22, 2014, we find a discussion of how believers should related to one another in Romans 15:2 (KJV)

Let every one of us please his neighbour for his good to edification.

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

Let each one of us make it a practice to please (make happy) his neighbor for his good and for his true welfare, to edify him [to strengthen him and build him up spiritually].

In a previous blog entry I discussed seven principles that were taught at the “It’s All about Relationships” Conference in 2013. Apostle Carolyn Warren discussed these principles that can be universally applied to “launch, challenge, and grow relationships.” These seven principles were expressed as verbs which connote action when specifically applied in terms of what should be done to “one another.” Here is a poetic summary of those principles:

We must learn to value and steward relationships,

As we ever strive to launch, grow and to maintain them.

As we love, honor, forgive and encourage each other,

We must admonish, serve, and make peace with one another.

In order to apply these seven principles, believers must apply the overarching principle expressed in Romans 15:7 and that is to “receive one another.” The New Living Translation puts it this way:

So accept each other just as Christ has accepted you; then God will be glorified.

The J.B. Phillips Translation offers this rendering:

So open your hearts to one another as Christ has opened his heart to you, and God will be glorified.

The Verse of the Day also brings to mind the first principle: “love one another.” Each day we receive or accept one another, as we decide to demonstrate, freely give and practice love: the first thread whereby we must launch all relationships and follow Christ’s command that we love one another.

Michael W. Smith offers comments and a spirited rendition of a “Love One Another.”

Romans 15:2–Please his neighbor

May 23, 2014

Romans_15-2

The Amplified Bible renders Romans 15:2 this way:

Let each one of us make it a practice to please (make happy) his neighbor for his good and for his true welfare, to edify him [to strengthen him and build him up spiritually].

The Verse of the Day for May 23, 2014 brings to mind the importance of our relationship with others as expressed in the first and great commandment: Love God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength, and love your neighbor as yourself. On these two hang all the law and the prophets, said Jesus Christ. When we love God, first of all, and then love others to the same degree that we love ourselves, we fulfill the law of love which is the highest expression of God, who is love.

Here is a musical expression of these profound truths by Martha Hall Bowman, who sings “The Greatest Commandment”:

I recall attending a life-changing “It’s All about Relationships” Conference, where Apostle Carolyn Warren discussed seven principles that can be universally applied to “launch, challenge, and grow relationships.” These seven principles were expressed as verbs which connote action when specifically applied in terms of what should be done to “one another.” Here is a poetic summary of those principles:

We must learn to value and steward relationships,

As we ever strive to launch, grow and to maintain them.

As we love, honor, forgive and encourage each other,

We must admonish, serve, and make peace with one another.

The Verse of the Day brings to mind the first principle: “love one another.” Each day we must decide to demonstrate, freely give and practice love: the first thread whereby we must launch all relationships and follow Christ’s command that we love one another.

Michael W. Smith offers comments and a spirited rendition of a “Love One Another.”