Posts Tagged ‘Romans 1:16’

We are not ashamed of the Gospel

July 17, 2019

In Romans 1:16, we find the Verse of the Day for July 17, 2019 in the Good News Translation:

[ The Power of the Gospel] I have complete confidence in the gospel; it is God’s power to save all who believe, first the Jews and also the Gentiles.

Here is the verse in the New Living Translation:

For I am not ashamed of this Good News about Christ. It is the power of God at work, saving everyone who believes—the Jew first and also the Gentile.

Because of the Lord Jesus Christ and all that he endured on our behalf, as believers we rejoice and celebrate the good news (the gospel of Christ). We are not put to shame because of Christ’s obedience. Looking at Hebrews 12:1-2, we can really appreciate what the Lord accomplished on our behalf:
Hebrews 12:1-2:

Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,
Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God.

When we turn our eyes upon Jesus Christ, we recognize all that he endured when he was made a curse, as he endured the cross, despising the shame and humiliation associated with such a disgraceful and shameful act, such as crucifixion.

In reflecting upon the Lord Jesus Christ and overwhelming burden of our sins that he bore, I recall the inspiration for a poem that I wrote in which I understood to a greater degree that the Lord was indeed my “Burden Bearer” In thinking on these two verses, my mind recalls a backpacking experience that occurred at TFI (Total Fitness Institute) in California back in December 1975. During this outdoor wilderness adventure, I was assigned to a platoon of believers, and we portioned out our food supply for the week among the group. I volunteered to carry the food for the last day, which meant that my load stayed the same while the load that everyone else carried got lighter.

On this particular day, we were told that we would hike for a mile and then take a break and rest for a while. After a considerable amount of time, I was certain that we had hiked more than a mile, but we continued. When I realized that I was carrying the food for the last day and that everyone else’s load was lighter than mine, I became agitated and began to complain in my mind that “This is just not fair. . .” During this time of frustration and agitation as I struggled under my heavy load, I thought of the Lord Jesus Christ and all that he gladly bore on my behalf. As I took my mind off myself and turned my thoughts toward the Lord, the distress and exasperation seemed to fade, and we arrived at our destination in a short time. That experience was the inspiration for this poem:

The Burden Bearer

Glory, Glory, Hallelujah,
When I lay my burden down.

I stumbled up the rugged road;
I almost fell beneath the load
And spurned the pain inside my head,
Recalling words of one who said
“Come unto me, and I will give you rest.”

The yoke I bear cannot compare
With all he took upon Himself:
All sins, disease, and guilt, despair
That I could not forebear myself.
His burden was not made of wood,
His cross beyond all words can name.
Have I resisted unto blood?
Could I for joy endure such shame?

From a glimpse into his face
I’m strengthened by a second wind;
I renew my mind’s to keep the pace
The load is lightened by my friend.

I feel better, so much better
since I laid my burden down.

Because the Lord willingly bore our sin and iniquity on the cross where he took upon himself all our guilt and shame, he released me from the bondage of guilt and shame for past failures. Lyrics from the contemporary gospel song “I am not ashamed of the Gospel” reinforce the message of the Verse of the Day, recorded here by the Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir:

I am not ashamed of the gospel

July 17, 2016

Romans 1_16

In Romans 1:16 (AMP) we find the Verse of the Day for July 17, 2016:

I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation [from His wrath and punishment] to everyone who believes [in Christ as Savior], to the Jew first and also to the Greek.

The “gospel” of Jesus Christ literally means the “good news”: the glorious gospel message of the overall intent and purpose of the Lord Jesus Christ, who came to bring salvation to the whole world. The “Good News” is said to recognize and celebrate the truth that Jesus Christ was born. With his birth the angel of the Lord assured the shepherds with these words:

Luke 2:10-11:

“. . . Do not be afraid; for behold, I bring you good news of a great joy which will come to all the people.

11For to you is born this day in the town of David a Savior, Who is Christ (the Messiah) the Lord!

The birth of Jesus Christ is part of “the gospel” which also notes that not only did he live but that he died and that he arose from the dead. Moreover, he is coming back again! Indeed, the “good news” is that through Jesus Christ those who believe on Him obtain salvation when they confess Jesus as Lord and believe that God raised him from the dead. The good news proclaims that believers are made whole, in spirit, mind, and body; it provides life everlasting for those who follow Him and offers the free gift of salvation to all who receive it.

In reflecting on the term “the good news of the gospel,” I recall comments about the first part of that phrase which introduces a poetic declaration entitled “Good News Day”:

. . . [T]here is no failure in God, for God is good. The very essence of God is goodness. Indeed, Jesus Christ said, “There is none good but the Father.” And there is no comparative or superlative with God. There are no “better” days with God. God does not have the “best” day He’s had in a long time in comparison to others. With God every day is a “Good News Day” because “God is good.” Period!

Many times in the midst of adverse circumstances when life is not unfolding as we think it should, we recall the words from Psalm 118:24, as we rejoice and celebrate the goodness of God one more time:

Good News Day

This is the day the LORD has made;
we will rejoice and be glad in it.
Psalm 118:24

It’s a good new day
no blues day
new shoes
no way to lose
What a good new day

It’s a great day
I can’t wait day
lift your voice
let’s rejoice
Good God, a good news day

It’s a payday
goin my way day
no nay–all yea
what you say
Such a good news day

It’s a live it up day
overflowin cup day
It’s a bright and bubbly
doubly lovely
Show-nuff good news day

As we celebrate the goodness of God every day, we also recognize the truths expressed in the lyrics from the gospel song “I am not ashamed of the Gospel” which reinforce the message of the Verse of the Day, recorded here by the Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir:

Because He is not ashamed, I am not ashamed

July 17, 2015

Romans 1_16In Romans 1:16 (NLT) we find the Verse of the Day for July 17, 2015:

For I am not ashamed of this Good News about Christ. It is the power of God at work, saving everyone who believes—the Jew first and also the Gentile.

This particular verse brought to mind a journal entry made over ten years ago where I examined a number of scriptures under the heading: “No More Shame!” According to Biblestudytools.com, the Arabic word for shame, disgrace, or dishonor is said to be ayb, translated as a dirty garment to be cast off by every effort. Indeed, shame is often associated with filthy garments. . . In the vernacular, we speak of “a lowdown dirty shame.” This concept related to soiled garments being removed is illustrated in Zechariah 3:3-4:

Now Joshua was standing before the angel, clothed with filthy garments. And the angel said to those who were standing before him, “Remove the filthy garments from him.” And to him he said, “Behold, I have taken your iniquity away from you, and I will clothe you with pure vestments.”

God speaks words of comfort to Israel through Isaiah, the prophet, who proclaims: Isaiah 54:4-5

Fear not; for thou shalt not be ashamed: neither be thou confounded; for thou shalt not be put to shame: for thou shalt forget the shame of thy youth, and shalt not remember the reproach of thy widowhood any more. For thy Maker is thine husband; the LORD of hosts is his name; and thy Redeemer the Holy One of Israel; The God of the whole earth shall he be called.

The expression “not ashamed” is used distinctively in the Scriptures, beginning with its first usage in Genesis. In reflecting upon that place, we are “yearning to return to Eden, to get back to the Garden” . . . the place of innocence, the first place where there was no shame: Genesis 2:25

And they were both naked, the man and his wife, and were not ashamed.

A number of references come from the Psalms regarding having no shame: Psalm 119:6

Then shall I not be ashamed, when I have respect unto all thy commandments.

Psalm 34:5 They looked unto him, and were lightened: and their faces were not ashamed. Psalm 31:1

In thee, O LORD, do I put my trust; let me never be ashamed: deliver me in thy righteousness.

Psalm 119:116

Uphold me according unto thy word, that I may live: and let me not be ashamed of my hope.

In the New Testament, a number of references also speak of having “no shame”: Hebrews 2:11 also reveals a similar attitude that Christ has toward those who call upon his name:

For both he that sanctifies and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren,

Hebrews 11:16 reminds us of God’s favorable attitude toward those who believe in Him:

But now they desire a better country, that is, a heavenly: wherefore God is not ashamed to be called their God: for he hath prepared for them a city.

Romans 5:5 makes a connection between having “no shame” and the hope of salvation:

And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto

Philippians 1:20 goes on to say:

According to my earnest expectation and my hope, that in nothing I shall be ashamed, but that with all boldness, as always, so now also Christ shall be magnified in my body, whether it be by life, or by death.

Regarding our hope that abides in our expectation of the Lord’s return, I John 2:28 encourages:

And now, little children, abide in him; that, when he shall appear, we may have confidence, and not be ashamed before him at his coming.

Most believers are quite familiar with Romans 10:9-10 which relate to salvation through confessing the Lord Jesus as Savior and believing that God raised him from the dead, but we sometimes forget the following verse: Romans 10:11 (KJV)

For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

Scripture says, No man who believes in Him [who adheres to, relies on, and trusts in Him] will [ever] be put to shame or be disappointed.

This verse and all the above related scriptures reinforce the message of the Verse of the Day. The lyrics from the contemporary gospel song “I am not ashamed of the Gospel” echo those same sentiments, recorded here by the Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir:

Because he bore the shame, I am not ashamed

July 17, 2014

Romans 1_16

In Romans 1:16 we find the Verse of the Day for July 17, 2014:

For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ: for it is the power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth; to the Jew first, and also to the Greek.

Because of the Lord Jesus Christ and all that he endured on our behalf, as believers we rejoice and celebrate the good news (the gospel of Christ). We are not put to shame because of Christ’s obedience. Looking at Hebrews 12:1-2, we can really appreciate what the Lord accomplished on our behalf:

Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God.

When we turn our eyes upon Jesus Christ, we recognize all that he endured when he was made a curse, as he endured the cross, despising the shame and humiliation associated with such a disgraceful and shameful act, such as crucifixion.

In reflecting upon the Lord Jesus Christ and overwhelming burden of our sins that he bore, I recall the inspiration for a poem that I wrote in which I understood to a greater degree that the Lord was indeed my “Burden Bearer” In thinking on these two verses, my mind recalls a backpacking experience that occurred at TFI (Total Fitness Institute) in California back in December, 1975. During this outdoor wilderness adventure I was assigned to a platoon of believers, and we portioned out our food supply for the week among the group. I volunteered to carry the food for the last day, which meant that my load stayed the same while the load that everyone else carried got lighter.

On this particular day, we were told that we would hike for a mile and then take a break and rest for a while. After a considerable amount of time, I was certain that we had hiked more than a mile, but we continued. When I realized that I was carrying the food for the last day and that everyone else’s load was lighter than mine, I became agitated and began to complain in my mind that “This is just not fair. . .” During this time of frustration and agitation as I struggled under my heavy load, I thought of the Lord Jesus Christ and all that he gladly bore on my behalf. As I took my mind off myself and turned my thoughts toward the Lord, the distress and exasperation seemed to fade, and we arrived at our destination in a short time. That experience was the inspiration for this poem:

The Burden Bearer

Glory, Glory, Hallelujah,

When I lay my burden down.

 

I stumbled up the rugged road;

I almost fell beneath the load

And spurned the pain inside my head,

Recalling words of one who said

Come unto me, and I will give you rest.”

 

The yoke I bear cannot compare

With all he took upon Himself:

All sins, disease, and guilt, despair

That I could not forebear myself.

His burden was not made of wood,

His cross beyond all words can name.

Have I resisted unto blood?

Could I for joy endure such shame?

 

From a glimpse into his face

I’m strengthened by a second wind;

My mind’s renewed to keep the pace

The load is lightened by my friend.

 

I feel better, so much better

since I laid my burden down.

 

Because the Lord willingly bore our sin and iniquity on the cross where he took upon himself all of our guilt and shame, he released me from bondage of guilt and shame for past failures. The lyrics from contemporary gospel song “I am not ashamed of the Gospel” reinforce the message of the Verse of the Day, recorded here by the Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir: