Posts Tagged ‘Psalm 90:2’

Psalm 90: A Prayer of Moses, the Man of God

June 7, 2017

Found in Psalm 90:2, 4 is the Verse of the Day for June 7, 2017:

Here is the New King James Version:

Before the mountains were brought forth,
Or ever You had formed the earth and the world,

Even from everlasting to everlasting, You are God.
For a thousand years in Your sight
Are like yesterday when it is past,
And like a watch in the night.

Psalm 90, in its entirety, is labeled “A Prayer of Moses, the Man of God.” Described as “the meekest man on the face of the earth,” Moses had this distinction: “The Lord would speak to Moses face to face, as one speaks to a friend.” The Psalmist declares that the Lord made known His “acts” unto the Children of Israel, but He made known His “ways” unto Moses. In a similar way as believers we also aspire to have such an intimate relationship with the Lord, as expressed in this way:

The Way You Speak

So the LORD spoke to Moses face to face,
as a man speaks to his friend. . . .
Exodus 33:11a

Open our ears to do more than just hear
Your voice but also teach us to listen.
Though the flow of tears at times may glisten,
Gently teach us to recognize those clear,
Familiar words you whisper in our ears.
As our teacher, help us not to hasten
Each lesson, even the times you chasten,
While reassuring and holding us near.
In seeking to dwell in your hiding place,
Our deepest yearning is to understand,
As we listen to hear each word you say.
Even as Moses knew you face to face,
So we long to know the way you speak and
Not question nor doubt but only obey.

Take a look at this rendering of Psalm 90 in the New Living Translation:

A prayer of Moses, the man of God.

1 Lord, through all the generations
you have been our home!
2 Before the mountains were born,
before you gave birth to the earth and the world,
from beginning to end, you are God.
3 You turn people back to dust, saying,
“Return to dust, you mortals!”
4 For you, a thousand years are as a passing day,
as brief as a few night hours.
5 You sweep people away like dreams that disappear.
They are like grass that springs up in the morning.
6 In the morning it blooms and flourishes,
but by evening it is dry and withered.
7 We wither beneath your anger;
we are overwhelmed by your fury.
8 You spread out our sins before you—
our secret sins—and you see them all.
9 We live our lives beneath your wrath,
ending our years with a groan.
10 Seventy years are given to us!
Some even live to eighty.
But even the best years are filled with pain and trouble;
soon they disappear, and we fly away.
11 Who can comprehend the power of your anger?
Your wrath is as awesome as the fear you deserve.
12 Teach us to realize the brevity of life,
so that we may grow in wisdom.
13 O LORD, come back to us!
How long will you delay?
Take pity on your servants!
14 Satisfy us each morning with your unfailing love,
so we may sing for joy to the end of our lives.
15 Give us gladness in proportion to our former misery!
Replace the evil years with good.
16 Let us, your servants, see you work again;
let our children see your glory.
17 And may the Lord our God show us his approval
and make our efforts successful.
Yes, make our efforts successful!

We conclude with a powerful musical rendition of Psalm 90 (A Thousand Years} by James Block.

How long is eternity?

June 7, 2015

Psalm 90--2Modified and re-posted from last year, the Verse of the Day for June 7, 2015 is found in Psalm 90:2, 4 (KJV):

Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever thou hadst formed the earth and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting, thou art God. For a thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night.

Take a look at this rendering of Psalm 90:2,4 in the New Living Translation:

Before the mountains were born,
before you gave birth to the earth and the world,
from beginning to end, you are God.

For you, a thousand years are as a passing day,
as brief as a few night hours.

Here we find verses that make known the magnitude of God. Indeed, the Scriptures speak of “the God eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wise God, to whom is due glory and honor and majesty forever and ever.” Other passages reveal the magnitude of an eternal God who is great and greatly to be praised.

1 Peter 5:10 speaks of “the God of all grace, who hath called us unto his eternal glory by Christ Jesus. . . .” and 1 Timothy 1:17 makes known this magnificent benediction:

Now unto the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wise God, be honor and glory forever and ever. Amen.

In addition, Deuteronomy 33:27 makes a similar declaration about who God is and what He will do:

The eternal God is thy refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms: and he shall thrust out the enemy from before thee; and shall say, Destroy them.

God is timeless. The above scriptures and others speak of eternity. As finite beings we have difficulty comprehending the infinite. I recall two analogies which help us to grasp to a degree eternity:

First of all, take a bucket, the size that you could handle, and use that bucket to remove water from all the seven seas or all the water that covers the earth. When you have completed the task that would mark the first day of eternity.

Another analogy asks that we imagine the Earth as a solid sphere of stainless steel. Every thousand years, a white dove takes a journey from the farthest side of the universe and flies to Earth and touches the planet with a brush of its wing, wearing away a microscopic amount of the planet. After a period of time the bird eventually wears away the whole earth. When this occurs, the first day of eternity will begin.

In addition, song writers attempt to express the eternal nature of God. The passage from Psalm 90 is the inspiration for one of the popular hymns by the great 18th Century hymn writer, Isaac Watts, “Even from everlasting, Thou art God.” The well-known hymn is offered in three different versions. The first is a “shape note anthem,” an example of “Sacred Harp singing” or “shape-note singing. Shape notes are a music notation designed to facilitate congregational and community singing. Harp singing or shape note singing dates back to the colonial period and continues to enjoy popularity in the rural South and elsewhere.

The second version is “O God, Our Help in Ages Past” comes from the Sharon Mennonite Bible Institute Singers

The third version is a contemporary rendering of “O God, Our Help in Ages Past” by Harvest Church.

Lord, help us to see to a greater degree, the magnitude of eternity.