Posts Tagged ‘Psalm 90:12’

Don’t waste your time: Redeem it

May 8, 2017

Colossians-4 5

The Verse of the Day for May 8, 2017 comes from Colossians 4:5-6 (NLT):

Conduct yourself with wisdom in your interactions with outsiders (non-believers), make the most of each opportunity [treating it as something precious]. Let your speech at all times be gracious and pleasant, seasoned with salt, so that you will know how to answer each one [who questions you].

Some may be more familiar with the King James Version:

Walk in wisdom toward them that are without, redeeming the time.

Let your speech be always with grace, seasoned with salt, that ye may know how ye ought to answer every man.

Similar words of encouragement are found in Ephesians 5:15 -17 (AMP):

Look carefully then how you walk! Live purposefully and worthily and accurately, not as the unwise and witless, but as wise–sensible, intelligent people;

Making the very most of the time–buying up each opportunity–because the days are evil.

Therefore do not be vague and thoughtless and foolish, but understanding and firmly grasping what the will of the Lord is.

These passages offer an exhortation to “live wisely” or “walk in wisdom” or “walk circumspectly.” In this instance the term “To walk circumspectly” means to walk carefully, accurately, “to be watchful on all sides.”  Walking in wisdom involves being intentional and making deliberate choices that determine the direction and ultimate fulfillment of one’s purpose in God.

As we mature in our Christian walk, these scriptures exhort us to make the most of our time, “to redeem the time.“ Time in the Word Ministries discusses the verb “redeeming” in the phrase “redeeming the time” which is translated from a Greek word which means “to be in the marketplace.” Literally it means  “to purchase out, buy up;  buy out of the hands of a person; to set free; to buy off, to secure for oneself or one’s own use; to buy up from the power or possession of any one.”

The word “time” in this instance does not refer to time in a general sense, rather the Greek word from which it is translated refers to a “ moment; a specific point in time. The term “a kairos-moment or season” is used to describe–a strategic moment; opportune time; moment or window of opportunity that God creates when something must be done now. We must cooperate with Him now to accomplish what we need to accomplish.

One way of understanding the concept is to see it as being in the right place at right time to purchase exactly what you need because the price is right. You are passing through the department store and you hear the “blue light special” for the item you came in to purchase at a reduced price.”

This idea of time as a quantity or entity to be purchased is powerfully expressed in this prophetic exhortation from Dutch Sheets:

“. . . We must buy or purchase the opportunities or opportune times God creates for us. We must be willing to spend our money; we must be willing to spend our time. It is a season for readjusting our priorities; it is a time when we begin to think very differently; because [of] the opportunities that God has created now we must spend whatever is necessary and purchase those.  We are going to have to spend our time, our money, our talents, our energies, our efforts, much prayer time; we are going have to be ready to do whatever it takes to do what God says in order to purchase those opportunities that are coming.  Tell my people that I’m about to create a season of tremendous opportunities . . . a season of ‘suddenlies’. . . I’m about to move them into a season where opportunities are about to come very, very quickly and they’re going have to be ready to move into them very quickly.”

The essence of “redeeming the time” is also captured in this poem:

 Time

So teach us to number our days,

that we may gain a heart of wisdom.

Psalm 90:12

 

Our lives begin with a handful of coins.

To wisely invest or squander each dime

The daily choice, though the Bible enjoins

Us to walk as wise, to redeem the time,

As a wise buyer with talents would keep

His eye on best buys sought before the chime

Should ring to bring each soul to his brief sleep

Or those who remain shall be gathered to

The bosom of the Father, there to reap

Their rewards, as each shall receive his due.

Time is fixed; we cannot borrow nor lend.

The coins we are given seem far too few.

Life is the sum of the coins that we spend

Before our time in life’s market shall end.

The accompanying video, while not the usual musical selection, shows the amount of time we have, and it urges us to “redeem the time” which is part of our walking in wisdom.

The essence of the message of Colossians 4:5 and other related verses is set to music with “Redeem the Time” by Joshua Simpkins:

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Redeeming the time

May 8, 2016

Colossians-4 5

Revised and re-posted below is The Verse of the Day for May 8, 2016 taken from Colossians 4:5-6 (KJV):

Walk in wisdom toward them that are without, redeeming the time. Let your speech be always with grace, seasoned with salt, that ye may know how ye ought to answer every man.

The passage begins with an exhortation to “Walk in wisdom.” Another most enlightening scripture regarding this concept occurs in Ephesians 5:15 (KJV):

See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise,

In this instance the term “To walk circumspectly” means to walk carefully, accurately, “to be watchful on all sides.”  Furthermore, walking in wisdom involves being intentional and making deliberate choices that determine the direction and ultimate fulfillment of one’s purpose in God.

Colossians 4:5 also introduces the concept of “redeeming the time.” The following portion of this blog entry is an excerpt from an Examiner.com article: “Don’t waste your time: Redeem it.”

As we mature in our Christian walk, the Scriptures exhort us to make the most of our time, “to redeem the time.

Ephesians 5:15-17 in Amplified Version puts it this way:

15 Therefore see that you walk carefully [living life with honor, purpose, and courage; shunning those who tolerate and enable evil], not as the unwise, but as wise [sensible, intelligent, discerning people],

16 making the very most of your time [on earth, recognizing and taking advantage of each opportunity and using it with wisdom and diligence], because the days are [filled with] evil.

17 Therefore do not be foolish and thoughtless, but understand and firmly grasp what the will of the Lord is.

We find similar words of encouragement in Colossians 4:5 (Amplified Version)

Behave yourselves wisely–living prudently and with discretion–in your relations with those of the outside world (the non-Christians), making the very most of the time and seizing (buying up) the opportunity.

Time in the Word Ministries discusses the verb “redeeming” in the phrase “redeeming the time” which is translated from a Greek word which means “to be in the marketplace.” Literally it means  “to purchase out, buy up;  buy out of the hands of a person; to set free; to buy off, to secure for oneself or one’s own use; to buy up from the power or possession of any one.”

The word “time” in this instance does not refer to time in a general sense, rather the Greek word from which it is translated refers to a “ moment; a specific point in time.” The term “a kairos-moment or season” is used to describe–a strategic moment; opportune time; moment or window of opportunity that God creates when something must be done now. We must cooperate with Him now to accomplish what we need to accomplish.

One way of understanding the concept is to see it as being in the right place at right time to purchase exactly what you need because the price is right. You are passing through the department store and you hear the “blue light special” for the item you came in to purchase at a reduced price.”

This idea of time as a quantity or entity to be purchased is powerfully expressed in this prophetic exhortation from Dutch Sheets:

“. . . We must buy or purchase the opportunities or opportune times God creates for us. We must be willing to spend our money; we must be willing to spend our time. It is a season for readjusting our priorities; it is a time when we begin to think very differently; because [of] the opportunities that God has created now we must spend whatever is necessary and purchase those.  We are going to have to spend our time, our money, our talents, our energies, our efforts, much prayer time; we are going have to be ready to do whatever it takes to do what God says in order to purchase those opportunities that are coming.  Tell my people that I’m about to create a season of tremendous opportunities . . . a season of ‘suddenlies’. . . I’m about to move them into a season where opportunities are about to come very, very quickly and they’re going have to be ready to move into them very quickly.”

The essence of “redeeming the time” is also captured in this poem:

 Time

So teach us to number our days,

that we may gain a heart of wisdom.                              

Psalm 90:12

 

Our lives begin with a handful of coins.

To wisely invest or squander each dime

The daily choice, though the Bible enjoins

Us to walk as wise, to redeem the time,

As a wise buyer with talents would keep

His eye on best buys sought before the chime

Should ring to bring each soul to his brief sleep

Or those who remain shall be gathered to

The bosom of the Father, there to reap

Their rewards, as each shall receive his due.

Time is fixed; we cannot borrow nor lend.

The coins we are given seem far too few.

Life is the sum of the coins that we spend

Before our time in life’s market shall end.

The accompanying video shows the amount of time that we have, and it urges us to “redeem the time” which is part of our walking in wisdom.

Here is musical selection by Joshua Simpkins, who also encourages us to “Redeem the Time.”

Prayer for the New Year

January 2, 2016

Psalm 90--12On January 2, 2016 the Verse of the Day for January 2, 2014 makes a request:

Psalm 90:12

Teach us to realize the brevity of life, so that we may grow in wisdom.

The King James Version provides this familiar expression:

So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.

In thinking about applying wisdom to our lives, we recognize that wisdom is not a static entity; it is not a trophy to be displayed with pride, but wisdom connotes action, being something that must be applied. The Psalmist further states, “I will behave myself wisely in a perfect way. O when will you come unto me? I will walk within my house with a perfect heart (Psalm 101:2).
In the Book of Proverbs we find two references to a synonymous phrase for “applying our hearts unto wisdom,” and they are “walking in wisdom” or “to walk as the wise”:

Proverbs 13:20

He who walks with wise men shall be wise: but a companion of fools shall be destroyed.

Proverbs 28:26

He that trusts in his own heart is a fool: but whoso walks wisely, he shall be delivered.

Two of the most enlightening scriptures regarding walking in wisdom occur in the New Testament:

Ephesians 5:15

See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise,

To walk circumspectly, means to walk carefully, accurately, “to be watchful on all sides.”

Colossians 4:5 instructs believers to

“Walk in wisdom toward them that are without, redeeming the time.”

Walking in wisdom involves being intentional and making deliberate choices that determine the direction and ultimate fulfillment of one’s purpose in God.

The Scriptures remind us that not only must we be “walking in wisdom,” but we also should be “walking by faith.” 2 Corinthians 5:7 in the Amplified Bible makes known this truth:

For we walk by faith, not by sight [living our lives in a manner consistent with our confident belief in God’s promises]—

These two vital concepts of wisdom and faith merge in the following expression of our heart’s desire as we move into this unfolding New Year:

Wisdom and Faith

“Through words of wisdom and faith, I call forth blessing to come upon me and overtake me.”
Patricia King

That your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God.
1 Corinthians 2:5

Through words of wisdom and faith, we call forth blessing

Upon blessing to overtake us and abound,

As we press toward the mark, while each day progressing

Until all who love His appearing will be crowned.

Through wisdom and faith, we call forth that which is not,

As though it were and follow faithful Abraham,

The father of all who still believe, no matter what.

We each declare “I am all that God says I am”

And align our lives in synch with the coming Kingdom.

Through the Blood of the Lamb and our testimony

We overcome by faith and the power of Christ’s wisdom,

For nothing can deter us from our destiny.

We press toward the mark, the prize we are destined to win,

By faith, hand in hand with wisdom, her gracious twin.

Bob Fitts sings our heart’s request: “Teach us O Lord to number our days”:

In pursuit of wisdom

September 16, 2015

James_3-13 James 3:13 (NKJV), the Verse of the Day for September 16, 2015, asks a question and provides the answer:

[Heavenly Versus Demonic Wisdom] Who is wise and understanding among you? Let him show by good conduct that his works are done in the meekness of wisdom.

In light of the topic of wisdom, this verse also brings to mind a series of teachings posted as blog entries entitled “Words of Wisdom”—a daily dose of “words to the wise.” Here is one of the entries modified and re-posted below:  

The Psalmist offers this exhortation:

So teach us to number our days that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.[Psalm 90:12 KJV]

As life-long learners, ever-eager students in the University of Life, we are continually learning more about God and our relationship with Him, particularly in terms of applying principles of wisdom, for each day abounds with opportunities to learn and grow.The following poem mentions wisdom in light of seeking the Spirit of Wisdom:

In Pursuit of Wisdom

If you seek skillful and godly wisdom as you would silver

And search for her as you would hidden treasures;

Then you will understand the [reverent] fear of the Lord  

[that is, worshiping Him

and regarding Him as truly awesome]

And discover the knowledge of God.

Proverbs 2:4-5 [Amplified Bible]

We chase an enemy, motivated to win,

To relentlessly follow and then overtake,

As a hunter reads footprints and tracks down his game,

So your fragrance arouses us as we awake.

This desire, a fire, flames the passion deep within.

Though we have felt your touch and kissed your lips before,

As lovers pursues their beloved, so do we

Yearn to be with you and to know you even more,

Assured that all who pursue you shall also find.

As the sun rises to follow its daily course,

Zealously we seek you with our heart and soul and mind,

As one traces a winding river to its source.

As one forsakes all to pursue a priceless treasure,

So we seek the spirit of wisdom’s good pleasure.

The last line of the poem brings to mind another song that captures the essence of that for which we are seeking: “Seekers of Your Heart” rendered by Steve Green, Sandi Patty and Larnelle Harris.

Teach us to number our days

January 2, 2015

Psalm-90--12The Verse of the Day for January 2, 2015 comes from Psalm 90:12 (KJV)

So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.

Proverbs 4:7 also reminds us that

Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting get understanding.

In thinking about applying wisdom to our lives, we recognize that wisdom is not a static entity; it is not a trophy to be displayed with pride, but wisdom connotes action, it is something that must be applied.

The Psalmist further states, “I will behave myself wisely in a perfect way. O when will you come unto me? I will walk within my house with a perfect heart (Psalm 101:2).

Wisdom is said to be the application of knowledge. We, thus, see that knowledge, wisdom, and understanding are intertwined as a three-fold cord. Furthermore, in discussing wisdom, we see that the Book of James identifies two sources of wisdom:

James 3:13-18

13 Who is a wise man and endued with knowledge among you? let him shew out of a good conversation his works with meekness of wisdom.

14 But if ye have bitter envying and strife in your hearts, glory not, and lie not against the truth.

15 This wisdom descendeth not from above, but is earthly, sensual, devilish.

16 For where envying and strife is, there is confusion and every evil work.

17 But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.

18 And the fruit of righteousness is sown in peace of them that make peace.

In the Book of Proverbs we find two additional references to a synonymous phrase for “applying our hearts unto wisdom,” and they are “walking in wisdom” or “to walk as the wise”:

Proverbs 13:20

He who walks with wise men shall be wise: but a companion of fools shall be destroyed.

Proverbs 28:26

He that trusts in his own heart is a fool: but whoso walks wisely, he shall be delivered.

Two of the most enlightening scriptures regarding walking in wisdom occur in the New Testament:

Ephesians 5:15

See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise,

To walk circumspectly, means to walk carefully, accurately, “to be watchful on all sides.”

Colossians 4:5 instructs believers to

“Walk in wisdom toward them that are without, redeeming the time.”

Walking in wisdom involves being intentional and making deliberate choices that determine the direction and ultimate fulfillment of one’s purpose in God. Not only are we exhorted to walk in wisdom, but the scriptures also remind us that “we walk by faith and not by sight.”

The following poem makes a connection between wisdom and faith, as we enter further into 2015, the New Year, which some have declared to be a year of great faith:

Wisdom and Faith

Through words of wisdom and faith, I call forth blessing

to come upon me and overtake me.”

Patricia King

 

That your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men,

but in the power of God.

I Corinthians 2:5

 

Through words of wisdom and faith, we call forth blessing

Upon blessing to overtake us and abound,

As we press toward the mark, while each day progressing

Until all who love His appearing will be crowned.

Through wisdom and faith, we call forth that which is not,

As though it were and follow faithful Abraham,

The father of all who still believe, no matter what.

We trust in the faithful Word of the Great I Am

And align our lives in synch with the coming Kingdom.

Through the Blood of the Lamb and our testimony

We overcome by faith and the power of Christ’s wisdom,

For nothing can deter us from our destiny.

We press toward the mark, the prize we are destined to win,

By faith, hand in hand with wisdom, her gracious twin.

 

Family Radio Broadcasting offers a musical reminder: “Teach Us to Number our Days.”

Psalm 90:12: Applying our hearts unto wisdom

January 2, 2014

Psalm 90--12The Verse of the Day for January 2, 2014 provides this exhortation:

Psalm 90:12:

So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.

In thinking about applying wisdom to our lives, I recognize that wisdom is not a static entity; it is not a trophy to be displayed with pride, but wisdom connotes action, it is something that must be applied. The Psalmist further states, “I will behave myself wisely in a perfect way. O when will you come unto me? I will walk within my house with a perfect heart (Psalm 101:2).

The exhortation to number our days begins with today, as we learn to take one day at a time. The lyrics to the song “Day by Day” from the musical Godspell, based on the Gospel of Matthew, offer this reminder:

Day by day
Day by day
Oh Dear Lord
Three things I pray
To see thee more clearly
Love thee more dearly
Follow thee more nearly
Day by day

Day by day
Day by day
Oh Dear Lord
Three things I pray
To see thee more clearly
Love thee more dearly
Follow thee more nearly
Day by day.

In the Book of Proverbs we find two references to a synonymous phrase for “applying our hearts unto wisdom,” and they are “walking in wisdom” or “to walk as the wise”:

Proverbs 13:20:

He who walks with wise men shall be wise: but a companion of fools shall be destroyed.

Proverbs 28:26

He that trusts in his own heart is a fool: but whoso walks wisely, he shall be delivered.

Two of the most enlightening scriptures regarding walking in wisdom occur in the New Testament:

Ephesians 5:15

See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise,

To walk circumspectly, means to walk carefully, accurately, “to be watchful on all sides.”

Colossians 4:5  instructs believers to

“Walk in wisdom toward them that are without, redeeming the time.”

Walking in wisdom involves being intentional and making deliberate choices that determine the direction and ultimate fulfillment of one’s purpose in God.

The following poem composed a number of years ago refers to “walking in wisdom” in the context of renewing the mind and maturing in Christ.

A New Song: Changing the Way We Receive the Word

 To change or remain the same is always a choice:

Either to conform to the world or be transformed,

To act to express our lives in the middle voice.

We face each new day, renewing our minds, reformed

To embrace a new way of receiving the Word.

To rise to another level demands a price:

To follow in the footsteps of Jesus, our Lord,

We must renew our minds and a make a sacrifice

And mature in Christ, as we walk forth in wisdom.

Our apostolic model will thrive and abound

To become a major influence for God’s Kingdom.

We bring forth fruit one hundredfold sown on good ground.

Sing a new song, for praise prepares us for worship:

The ultimate expression of our true sonship.

The accompanying video, while not the usual musical selection, shows the amount of time we have and urges us to “redeem the time” which is part of our walking in wisdom or applying our hearts unto wisdom.

 

Brand new look, brand new name but motive remains the same

March 3, 2011

Although my  Wordpress Blog has a brand new look, along with a brand new name, my motive, however, remains the same: I am “still compounding after the art of the apothecary. . . filling prescriptions to minister to the heart and soul.”

Recently I retrieved a journal entry that appeared to be a poetic response to a set of scriptures read during a particular time of prayer and fasting.

Day 25  April 13  Isaiah 10:26-27; I John 2:20; Isaiah 9:1-4

The anointing that breaks every yoke flows freely,

Released within me to slip past the enemy;

Anointed anew with oil compounded by me,

After the fine art of the apothecary.

The four-line stanza or quatrain with the same ending rhyme and metrical pattern makes reference to being “anointed anew,” a characteristic that I trust my “new” blog reflects. At the time of the journal entry, I recall a number of messages, personal prophetic words, and other references to “a new anointing”, the inspiration behind this poem with that title:

 A New Anointing

 But my horn you have exalted

like a wild ox; I have been

anointed with fresh oil.

Psalm 92:10

 

I am still overwhelmed, utterly astounded

When I recall all the Lord has done as I stand

In this place of grace where sin had once abounded.

Yielded and still, I submit to all that He has planned,

As I receive a new anointing compounded

Still after the art of the apothecary.

Fragrant  blessings caress all that I do and say,

 As I touch the realm of the extraordinary.

 I must walk in wisdom and not be confounded

 By devilish devices that distract and dismay.

 I look to God who shall bless and refresh my soul,

 As He pours this precious ointment upon my head

 That I might be sanctified, preserved and made whole

 And trade sorrow for the oil of gladness instead.

 Trusting in God’s will is never disappointing,

 As I receive from on high this new anointing.

 

Recently in a presentation celebrating Black History Month, I paid tribute to Jupiter Hammon, the first person of African descent to publish a poem in colonial America, recognizing that this year is the Tri-Centennial of his birth. I commented upon Hammon’s poetry which is inspired by the Bible and borne out of a personal salvation experience. I also shared that my introduction to Hammon, one of four African American poets whom I discussed in my doctoral dissertation, occurred when I was freshman pharmacy student at Purdue University back in 1961. Most remarkably I knew that I wanted to become a pharmacist when I was 15 years old, and I “prophesied to myself” that I would go to Purdue and major in pharmacy, the first time that I set foot on the campus. I enrolled in what would become the first graduating class of the newly implemented five-year pharmacy program at Purdue.

After graduation I passed the state board examination and became a registered pharmacist in Indiana. For more than 25 years, I practiced the profession in Indiana, Washington, DC and North Carolina. Although I have not been involved in pharmacy as a career since 1994, I have come to recognize the spiritual parallel of my initial profession: “first in the natural, then in the spirit . . .”  I have since come to know this reality in the lines of this particular poem, one of my heart songs. You might say it is the signature piece for this new blog that I have renamed “Dr. J’s Apothecary Shoppe.” I invite you to stop by and see what remedies I have been working on recently, as I continue to compound: 

 After the Art of the Apothecary                                 

 And thou shalt make it an oil of holy ointment,

an ointment compound after the art of the apothecary:

it shall be an holy anointing oil.

Exodus 30:25 [KJV]

  

I desire to follow recipes and not to vary

From the prescribed formulas for the remedies I need,

 To compound after the art of the apothecary.

 

I long to work circumspectly and always be wary,

 To measure and mix precisely for love and not for greed.

I desire to follow recipes and not to vary.

 

I recall yearning to learn from childhood days in Gary,

 To weigh my decisions and follow as the Lord would lead,

To compound after the art of the apothecary.

 

I seek to formulate my ideal art and to marry

Vocation and avocation as one of love and need.

I desire to follow recipes and not to vary.

 

I attempt to move with wisdom but never to tarry

To master each prescription, to excel and to succeed,

To compound after the art of the apothecary.

 

The sweet smelling savor I desire my life to carry

Is the pure, holy anointing oil tempered of my need.

I desire to follow recipes and not to vary,

 To compound after the art of the apothecary. 

In earlier times doctors were surgeons, eye doctors, dentist, psychologists, and general practitioners. Doctors diagnosed patients, prescribed medicine and then filled their own prescriptions in the front part of the shop.  Such may have been the case in this photo of an apothecary shop in Charleston, SC around 1790. Such also may be the case, spiritually speaking, with Dr. J in his “new” apothecary shop.

Inside an historic apothecary shop