Posts Tagged ‘Psalm 31:19’

Surely goodness

February 5, 2017

Psalm 33_4-5

The Verse of the Day for February 5, 2017 is found in Psalm 33:4-5 in the New Living Translation:

For the word of the Lord holds true, and we can trust everything he does. He loves whatever is just and good; the unfailing love of the Lord fills the earth.

The New King James Version put it this way:

For the word of the Lord is right,
And all His work is done in truth.
He loves righteousness and justice;
The earth is full of the goodness of the Lord.

Verse 5 speaks of the “goodness of the Lord” that fills the whole Earth, bringing to mind one of the themes for the New Year: “2017 Unlimited Goodness and Unlimited Favor.”

Without question, the goodness of God surrounds us and sustains us every day. The Psalmist reiterates this truth:

Psalm 27:13 (KJV)

I had fainted unless I had believed to see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living.

The Holman Standard Bible boldly declares:

Psalm 31:19

How great is Your goodness that You have stored up for those who fear You and accomplished in the sight of everyone for those who take refuge in You.

God’s goodness toward us is expressed in Jesus Christ, who acknowledged that there is no one good except the Father. The very essence of God is goodness which believers personalize when we proclaim:

Oh, my goodness,

Oh, my gracious,

Oh, my goodness, gracious Lord.

Romans 2:4 (NKJV) raises this question regarding God’s goodness:

Or do you despise the riches of His goodness, forbearance, and longsuffering, not knowing that the goodness of God leads you to repentance?

The lyrics to another song also ask the same question and provide an answer:

Don’t you know the goodness of God leads us to repentance?

He has cancelled the curse and commuted our sentence.

By His gift of love and grace, Christ has taken our place

And redeemed us from the hand of the enemy.

Open your eyes and you will see

His goodness and forbearance and longsuffering.

Yes, the goodness of God leads us to repentance.

Yes, the goodness of God leads us to repentance.

As Christian believers, we give thanks to God for His grace and goodness. With our lips we give praise and bless the Lord, singing of His goodness. One of the most often quoted Old Testament passages is Psalm 23 which mentions the goodness of the Lord in the last verse:

23 The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.

He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters.

He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.

Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.

Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over.

Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.

The last verse reminds us that goodness, like a rear guard, a powerful “back-up,” follows us throughout our lives. Israel Houghton shares this lively musical reminder of this life-sustaining truth:

Goodness of the Lord

February 5, 2016

Psalm 33_4-5

The Verse of the Day for February 5, 2016 comes Psalm 33:4-5 (NLT):

For the word of the Lord holds true,
and we can trust everything he does.
He loves whatever is just and good;
the unfailing love of the Lord fills the earth.

The New King James Version speaks of the “goodness of the Lord”:

For the word of the Lord is right,
And all His work is done in truth.
He loves righteousness and justice;
The earth is full of the goodness of the Lord.

Without question, the goodness of God surrounds us and sustains us every day. The Psalmist reiterates this truth:

Psalm 27:13 (KJV)

I had fainted unless I had believed to see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living

The Holman Standard Bible boldly declares:

Psalm 31:19

How great is Your goodness that You have stored up for those who fear You and accomplished in the sight of everyone for those who take refuge in You.

God’s goodness toward us is expressed in Jesus Christ, who acknowledged that there is no one good except the Father. The very essence of God is goodness which believers personalize when we proclaim: “Oh, my goodness! Oh, my gracious! Oh, my goodness, gracious, Lord!”

The lyrics to this original song also speak of

The Goodness of the Father

For the goodness of the Father ever abides with us.

From his goodness flows his favor,

O, taste and see that the Lord is good.

He has promised goodness to his servants,

He has clothed us with salvation.

Let us rejoice in His goodness, and declare that only the Lord, our God, is good.

 

O how good, He’s so good, beyond compare,

Exquisite and rare, He’s so good.

O how good, He’s so good,

Come join with me: O, taste and see that the Lord is good.

Romans 2:4 (NKJV) raises this question regarding God’s goodness:

Or do you despise the riches of His goodness, forbearance, and longsuffering, not knowing that the goodness of God leads you to repentance?

The lyrics to another song also ask the same question and provide answers:

Don’t you know the goodness of God leads us to repentance?

He has cancelled the curse and commuted our sentence.

By His gift of love and grace, Christ has taken our place

And redeemed us from the hand of the enemy.

Open your eyes and you will see

His goodness and forbearance and longsuffering.

Yes, the goodness of God leads us to repentance.

Yes, the goodness of God leads us to repentance.

As Christian believers, we give thanks to God for His grace and goodness. With our lips we give praise and bless the Lord and sing of His goodness. One of the most quoted passages from the Old Testament is Psalm 23, one of my favorites that I committed to memory years ago, mentions the goodness of the Lord in the last verse:

23 The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.

He maketh me to lie down in green pastures: he leadeth me beside the still waters.

He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name’s sake.

Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.

Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over.

Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.

The last verse reminds us that goodness, like a rear guard, a powerful “back-up,” follows us throughout our lives. Israel Houghton shares this lively musical reminder of this life-sustaining truth:

Oh: Word for the Day

January 17, 2016

O

In November of last year I posted a blog entry devoted to the Word for the Day, rather than the Verse of the Day. In these entries I examined a particular word or phrase, expounding upon its meaning and personal application. Two such entries were developed last year, and I would like to post an entry today that targets the word “Oh.” Whether spelled with one letter (O) or two (Oh), the word is an interjection, a familiar part of speech that is used to express a wide range of emotions, including pain, sorrow, joy, excitement, hesitation, recognition, and many others.

Throughout the Bible “Oh” or “O,” depending on the translation, is used to express surprise, acknowledgement, or regret, as in the first time that the word is used in the Bible. E.W. Bullinger points out that the first time that a particular word is used in the Bible marks its significance and importance when studying the word. The first usage in Bible is found in Genesis 17:18 (Amplified Bible) in this exchange:

And Abraham said to God, “Oh, that Ishmael [my firstborn] might live before You!”

Throughout the Psalms the term is used 67 times. Here is an instance where a cry out to God is expressed in this way:

Psalm 25: 17

My problems go from bad to worse. Oh, save me from them all!

A number of places in Psalms express wonder, amazement, and absolute awe of God, such as Psalm 31:19 (AMP):

Oh, how great is Your goodness,
Which You have laid up for those who fear You,
Which You have prepared for those who trust in You
In the presence of the sons of men!

Psalm 32:1 in New Living Translation expresses David’s delight in God in light of His forgiveness:

Oh, what joy for those whose disobedience is forgiven, whose sin is put out of sight.

In Psalm 34:8 the Psalmist offers an invitation which opens with the interjection:

Oh, taste and see that the Lord is good; Blessed is the man who trusts in Him!

This particular verse was the inspiration behind this this scripture memory song:

Oh, Taste and See

Oh, taste and see, see that the Lord is good, so good.
Blessed is the man that puts his trust in Him.

Partake of the Word of God,
Taste and see that it is good.
It will fill you up
More than any kind of food.

Oh, taste and see, see that the Lord is good, so good.
Blessed is the man that puts his trust in Him.

Partake of the Word of God,
Let it richly dwell within.
It will help you grow.
It’s better than a vitamin.

Oh, taste and see, see that the Lord is good, so good.
Blessed is the man that puts his trust in Him.

Partake of the Word of God,
Read the Word and put God first.
It will feed your soul
And satisfy your thirst.

Oh, taste and see, see that the Lord is good, so good.
Blessed is the man that puts his trust in Him.

In a striking contrast, David calls out to God in desperation. Feeling overwhelmed and beset by his enemies on every hand, David calls out in Psalm 55:6 which introduces another scripture memory song:

Oh, That I Had Wings Like a Dove

And I said, Oh that I had wings like a dove!
for then would I fly away, and be at rest.
Psalm 55:6

Oh, that I had wings like a dove,
wings like a dove, wings like a dove.
Oh, that I had wings like a dove,
I would fly away and be at rest.

Then I would fly away to the cleft of the rock
And find my refuge in His secret place.
For there’s safety in the cleft of the rock.
He wraps my soul in His mercy and grace.

Oh, that I had wings like a dove,
wings like a dove, wings like a dove.
Oh, that I had wings like a dove,
I would fly away and be at rest.

There’s safety from confusion and strife
Where all fears dissolve and all worries cease.
Resting and nesting to bring forth new life,
He surrounds me with His love and peace.

Oh, that I had wings like a dove,
wings like a dove, wings like a dove.
Oh, that I had wings like a dove,
then I would fly away and be at rest.

Psalm 107 opens with this exclamatory statement:

Psalm 107:1

Oh, give thanks to the LORD, for He is good!
For His mercy endures forever.

A similar expression is repeated as refrain throughout the psalm in verses 8, 15, 21

Oh, that men would give thanks to the LORD for His goodness,
And for His wonderful works to the children of men!

This refrain from Psalm 107:8, 15, and 21 is rendered in song:

In addition to the various places in the Psalms and in other books of the Old Testament, the expression “Oh” is used sparingly throughout the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke, as well as some of the epistles of Paul: Romans, 1 and 2 Corinthians, and Galatians, with the last use of the word found in 1 Timothy 1:14 (NLT):

Oh, how generous and gracious our Lord was! He filled me with the faith and love that come from Christ Jesus.

At times we are so overcome with gratitude to God for His goodness and for His graciousness, and all we can say is “Oh, my goodness, Oh my gracious. . . Oh, my goodness, Oh, my gracious Lord!”

To close out our discussion of the Word of the Day, listen to a song based on Psalm 105:1-5, 7-8a: “Oh, Give Thanks to the LORD” by Esther Mui.