Posts Tagged ‘Parable of the Prodigal Son’

Rescued from the Lost and Found

April 27, 2021

The blog entry for the Verse of the Day for April 27, 2021 is a revision of a previous post based on  Luke 19:10 in the Amplified Bible:

For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.

In fact, in Luke 15 we find three parables related to lost items: “The Parable of the Lost Sheep”, “The Parable of the Lost Coin”, and “The Parable of the Prodigal Son.” In each instance, something is lost, and when it is found there is great celebration and rejoicing.

In the first account, a man has 100 sheep, and one is lost. The man leaves the ninety-nine and diligently pursues the lost sheep until he finds it and returns home.

Luke 15:6 (AMP)

And when he gets home, he calls together his friends and his neighbors, saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, because I have found my lost sheep!’

Similarly, Luke 15:8-9 describes another lost item and finding it.

 [The Lost Coin] “Or what woman, if she has ten silver coins [each one equal to a day’s wages] and loses one coin, does not light a lamp and sweep the house and search carefully until she finds it?

And when he gets home, he calls together his friends and his neighbors, saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, because I have found my lost sheep!’

At the end of the Parable of the Prodigal Son, the third instance of a lost item, the father responds to his resentful son who stayed behind while his younger brother “squandered his substance in riotous living”:

Luke 15:32b

. . . for thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.

At the end of this moving account, the forgiving father “spread the welcome table and had a family feast. . .” and in Luke 15:24 proclaims:

For this son of mine was [as good as] dead and is alive again; he was lost and has been found.’ So they began to celebrate.

These three accounts of lost items remind of us our state before the Lord Jesus Christ rescued us from the “Lost and Found” of this world. Every believer is deposited as lost property awaiting retrieval by our rightful owner. We are eternally grateful that Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, came to seek and to save the Lord. The lyrics to “I’m forever Grateful” express our thoughts:

To seek and save the lost

April 27, 2018

Luke 19_10

The Verse of the Day for April 27, 2018 is taken from Luke 19:10 in the Amplified Bible:

For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.

In fact, in Luke 15 we find three parables related to lost items: “The Parable of the Lost Sheep”, “The Parable of the Lost Coin”, and “The Parable of the Prodigal Son.” In each instance, something is lost, and when it is found there is great celebration and rejoicing.

In the first account, a man has 100 sheep, and one is lost. The man leaves the ninety-nine and diligently pursues the lost sheep until he find it and returns home

Luke 15:6 (AMP)

And when he gets home, he calls together his friends and his neighbors, saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, because I have found my lost sheep!’

Similarly, Luke 15:8-9 describes another lost item and finding it.

 [The Lost Coin] “Or what woman, if she has ten silver coins [each one equal to a day’s wages] and loses one coin, does not light a lamp and sweep the house and search carefully until she finds it?

At the end of the Parable of the Prodigal Son, the third instance of a lost item, the father responds to his resentful son who stayed behind while his younger brother “squandered his substance in riotous living”:

Luke 15:32b

. . . for thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.

At the end of this moving account, the forgiving father “spread the welcome table and had a family feast. . .” and in Luke 15:24 proclaims:

For this son of mine was [as good as] dead and is alive again; he was lost and has been found.’ So they began to celebrate.

These three accounts of lost items remind of us our state before the Lord Jesus Christ rescued us from the “Lost and Found” of this world. Every believer is deposited as lost property awaiting retrieval by our rightful owner. We are eternally grateful that Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, came to seek and to save the lost. The lyrics to “I’m forever Grateful” express our thoughts:

To seek and to save the lost: The prodigal son

April 27, 2016

Luke 19_10

The Verse of the Day for April 27, 2016 is taken from Luke 19:10 (KJV):

For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.

In reflecting on this verse, I thought of a similar expression that comes at the end of the Parable of the Prodigal Son, as the father responds to his resentful son who stayed behind while his younger brother “squandered his substance in riotous living”:

Luke 15:32b:

. . . for thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.

In Luke 15 we find three parables related to lost items: “The Parable of the Lost Sheep”, “The Parable of the Lost Coin”, and “The Parable of the Prodigal Son.” That particular parable is a favorite of mine, and I recall also seeing for the first time the Rembrandt portrait of the Prodigal Son which moved me in a most remarkable manner.

Rembrandt's Return_of_the_Prodigal_Son

I have personalized and poetically expressed my identification with the Prodigal Son, who is impacted and forever changed by the compassion of his “Forgiving Father,” the “Real Hero” of the passage. Each time I read this account, I think of this piece:

Homecoming

The Parable of the Prodigal Son
Luke 15:11-32

I prodigalled
and partied
and boogied my
nights away.

I humped and bumped
and stumbled
till I found myself
in a ditch.

I squandered all
of my bread,
down to my
very last crumb.

I had no friends
to turn to
I had no place to go
but home.

I tried to sneak back
unnoticed,
but Daddy ran
to meet me
and greet me with
open arms
(like I’d been down
the road apiece,
or just got
back from town,
or never been
gone at all).

He didn’t ask me
where I’d been,
didn’t ask how
much I’d spent.

He forgave me,
just forgot
all the times I’d
plumb missed the mark.

He spread the
welcome table
and had a
family feast
to satisfy
my hunger
and meet my
every need.

Later on in the
midnight peace
when Pa and I
were alone,
we said nothing,
yet so much;
then through tears
of joy he said,

“It’s all right, son–
it’s all right, now.”

Listen to this moving rendition of “Prodigal” by Casting Crowns:

Lost and found: Parable of the Prodigal Son

April 27, 2015

Luke 19_10

Luke 19:10 NLT

For the Son of Man came to seek and save those who are lost.”

The Verse of the Day for April 27, 2015 was originally posted a year ago and has been modified and reposted below:

Rembrandt's Return_of_the_Prodigal_Son As I reflected upon the Verse of the Day, I thought of the parables of the lost recorded in Luke 15: “The Parable of the Lost Sheep”, “The Parable of the Lost Coin” and “The Parable of the Prodigal Son.” I recall seeing for the first time the Rembrandt portrait of the Prodigal Son which moved me in a most remarkable manner. That particular parable is a favorite of mine, and I have personalized and poetically expressed my identification with the Prodigal Son who is impacted and forever changed by the compassion of his “Forgiving Father,” the “Real Hero” of the passage. Each time I read this account, I think of this poetic rendering:

Homecoming

The Parable of the Prodigal Son

Luke 15:11-32

I prodigalled

and partied

and boogied my

nights away.

I humped and bumped

and stumbled

till I found myself

in a ditch.

I squandered all

of my bread,

down to my

very last crumb.

I had no friends

to turn to

I had no place to go

but home.

I tried to sneak back

unnoticed,

but Daddy ran

to meet me

and greet me with

open arms

(like I’d been down

the road apiece,

or just got

back from town,

or never been

gone at all).

He didn’t ask me

where I’d been,

didn’t ask how

much I’d spent.

He forgave me,

just forgot

all the times I’d

plumb missed the mark.

He spread the

welcome table

and had a

family feast

to satisfy

my hunger

and meet my

every need.

Later on in the

midnight peace

when Pa and I

were alone,

we said nothing,

yet so much;

then through tears

of joy he said,

“It’s all right, son–

it’s all right, now.”

One of the songs that comes to mind in thinking about “that which was lost” is the most celebrated hymn of the Christian Church, “Amazing Grace” with the opening stanza:

Amazing grace, how sweet the sound

That saved a wretch like me.

I once was lost, but now I’m found.

Was blind but now I see.

Listen to this moving rendition of the classic hymn sung by Wintley Phipps.