Posts Tagged ‘more than conquerors’

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month 2020

September 5, 2020

As the ninth month of the year continues to unfold, we sound the trumpet to alert the public that September has been designated as Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. as we focus on this important health concern among American men.

About 1 in 9 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetime. Last year, over 170,000 men received such a diagnosis. Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men, especially in African American men. However, prostate cancer develops mainly in older men. About 6 out of 10 cases are diagnosed in men aged 65 or older, and it is rare before age 40. The average age at the time of diagnosis is about 66.

Although prostate cancer can be a serious disease, the good news is that most men diagnosed with prostate cancer do not die from it—”I am a living witness!” In fact, in the United States, more than 2.9 million men who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer at some point in their lives are still alive today. A diagnosis of prostate cancer or any other cancer or debilitating disease is not a “death sentence,” but it can be a “life sentence” to build your faith and trust in God.

During National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, we remember those we have lost to prostate cancer and celebrate survivors, as we renew our commitment to preventing, detecting, and treating this frequently occurring illness. During September, we encourage men to have a health check-up and talk to their doctor about prostate cancer. In fact, September 17 is also designated Take a Loved One to the Doctor Day. Light blue is the color of the ribbon bringing attention to prostate cancer.

Blue signifies the blue skies or the life-giving air and often symbolizes hope or good health. As the poet proclaims:

pastel blue
lighter, brighter
subtle twinge
of powder blue
like Betty Lou
hop-scotchin
up to sky blue
and back

As a prostate cancer survivor, I recognize the personal significance of September as Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Receiving a diagnosis of prostate cancer in 2000 was life-changing for me, as I asked God what to do. He gave me a holistic strategy, a battle plan, that took me down the road less traveled by that ultimately led to my being not just as a survivor but more than a conqueror. I share my testimony in Embracing Your Life Sentence: How to Turn Life’s Greatest Tragedies into Your Greatest Triumphs. The book closes with an original poem of celebration with Romans 8:37 as its introduction, expressing my new identity not, just during Prostate Cancer Awareness Month but every day I draw breath:

Embracing Your Life Sentence–
More than a Conqueror


Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors
and gain an overwhelming victory through Him
who loved us [so much that He died for us].

Romans 8:37 (AMP)


Embracing Your Life Sentence, more than a conqueror,
Defying the odds as a brave conquistador.
Despite intense pressure, I learn to rest in grace,
More than enough to withstand the daily tests I face,
Not merely to survive but to thrive even more.

A mighty warrior, triumphant super-victor
With a cause, prepared not to die but to live for.
At times I fell behind but fought to keep the pace:
Embracing Your Life Sentence, more than a conqueror,

To fulfill all the will of God and then to soar
To heights sublime where I have never been before.
Overcomer, bearing light in the darkest place,
I still fight the good fight, as I finish my race,
Moving forward, seeking to find the next open door:
Embracing Your Life Sentence, more than a conqueror,

We close with the Rend Collection reinforcing the message “More than Conquerors”:

My book is available through Amazon.com and wherever books are sold and through my website: https://lonnelledwardjohnson.com. Check out another tribute to Prostate Cancer Awareness Month on Medium.com and celebrate the goodness and the grace of God with me.

Dr. J is celebrating as not just a survivor but more than a conqueror.

National Cancer Survivors Day: We are more than conquerors

June 7, 2020

Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. Although the number of patients diagnosed with cancer appears to be increasing, cancer patients overall are living longer. While the number of cancer survivors in the United States continues to go up, a new report by the American Cancer Society – in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute – estimates more than 16.9 million cancer survivors are alive in the US today with more than 32 million survivors worldwide. We all know someone whose life has been touched by cancer.

On the first Sunday in June, National Cancer Survivors Day, communities across the U.S. and abroad hold celebrations to acknowledge the cancer survivors in their community, to raise awareness of the ongoing challenges cancer survivors face because of their disease, and – most importantly – to celebrate life.

According to the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation, administrator for the celebration, “A ‘survivor’ is anyone living with a history of cancer – from the moment of diagnosis through the remainder of life.”

As a twenty-year prostate cancer survivor, I acknowledge that three words– “You’ve got cancer”: whether said to a loved one or to you, can change your life forever. While some may see cancer as a death sentence, I see it as a “life sentence” that transformed my thinking.

In celebration of National Cancer Survivor Day, I would like to share an excerpt from my book where I recount part of my journey of faith following my cancer diagnosis. Embracing Your Life Sentence: How to Turn Life’s Greatest Tragedies into Your Greatest Triumphs weaves original poetry and Scripture into my battle plan to show how I emerged, as not just a survivor but more than a conqueror.

More than a Conqueror

I posted a blog entry on Dr. J’s Apothecary Shoppe on June 4, 2017, the first Sunday in June. The post focused on what I called the Word of the Day, which in this case was “survivor.” In its most literal sense, the term means “one who survives.” FreeDictionary.com offers this series of definitions of the verb “to survive” as an action verb that has an object to receive its action. In this case, to survive cancer—

1. To live longer than; outlive.
2. To live, persist, or remain usable through any adverse situation.
3. To cope with (a trauma or setback); persevere after.
The verb is derived from Latin—supervivere, combining the prefix super + vīvere, to live.

Having been diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2000, I have come to understand what it means to be a cancer survivor on a deeply personal level. I recognize a survivor as one who, after encountering an extremely adverse situation, is revived to not only survive but to thrive. Jesus Christ, the ultimate example of a survivor, endured the cross, despising the shame, and after undergoing unimaginable physical abuse, along with the emotional and psychological trauma of the highest degree, arose triumphantly over death itself. Like Christ, I have been revived not only to survive but to thrive, having been transformed from victim to victor.
The true essence of who I am as a believer in Christ is expressed in Romans 8:37:

Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him that loved us.

The Amplified Bible puts it this way—

Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors and gain an overwhelming victory through Him who loved us [so much that He died for us].

The expression “more than conquerors” is translated in the Greek New Testament from the verb hupernikao, a compound word with the prefix huper—a form of the same prefix found in survive—meaning over, beyond, above exceed, more than. Today, common expressions of the preposition would say over and above or above and beyond. The stem would be nikao, translated “to conquer, prevail, overcome, overpower, prevail.” Although translated as such, being more than conquerors or super conquerors, is not who we are, but it is what we do, how we live. We completely and overwhelmingly conqueror in the present tense with continuous action; we prevail mightily every day of our lives.

Each year I reflect with gratitude to God for being alive and being able to cherish another year of life. As is my tradition, I sometimes compose a poem of celebration on my birthday. Most remarkably, Romans 8:37 was the epigraph or introduction for a poem composed on my 74th birthday, expressing my new identity in light of the Word for the Day for Cancer Survivors Day and every day I draw breath:

Embracing Your Life Sentence—More than a Conqueror

Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors
and gain an overwhelming victory through Him
who loved us [so much that He died for us].
—Romans 8:37 (AMP)

Embracing Your Life Sentence, more than a conqueror,
Defying the odds as a brave conquistador.
Despite intense pressure, I learn to rest in grace,
More than enough to withstand the daily tests I face,
Not merely to survive but to thrive even more.

A mighty warrior, triumphant super victor
With a cause, prepared not to die but to live for.
At times I fell behind but fought to keep the pace:
Embracing Your Life Sentence, more than a conqueror.

To fulfill all the will of God and then to soar
To heights sublime where I have never been before.
Overcomer, bearing light in the darkest place,
I still fight the good fight, as I finish my race,
Moving forward, seeking to find the next open door:
Embracing Your Life Sentence, more than a conqueror.

Steven Curtis Chapman offers a musical summation of this post: “More than Conquerors”:


To obtain a copy of Embracing Your Life Sentence: How to Turn Life’s Greatest Tragedies into Your Greatest Triumphs go to https://lonnelledwardjohnson.com and click on “book.”It is also available through Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, and bookstores everywhere.

Not just a survivor: More than a conqueror

June 3, 2018

Romans 8--37

Today’s blog entry for June 3, 2018, the first Sunday in June, is posted in recognition of National Cancer Survivors Day. This observance has been set aside as a “Celebration of Life” for those who have survived a diagnosis of cancer. In events conducted in communities all over the nation and across the globe, those who celebrate show the world that life after a cancer diagnosis can be fruitful and rewarding.

This post focuses on what I call the Word of the Day, in this case, “survivor.” In its most literal sense, the term means “one who survives.” FreeDictionary.com offers this series of definitions of the verb “to survive” as an action verb that has an object to receive its action. In this case, to survive cancer:

  1. To live longer than; outlive.
  2. To live, persist, or remain usable through any adverse situation.
  3. To cope with (a trauma or setback); persevere after.

The verb is derived from Latin: supervivere: combining the prefix super + vīvere, to live.

Having been diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2000, I have come to understand what it means to be a cancer survivor on a deeply personal level. I recognize a “survivor” as one who, after encountering an extremely adverse situation, is revived to not only survive but to thrive. Jesus Christ, the ultimate example of a “survivor,” endured the cross, despising the shame, and after undergoing unimaginable physical abuse, along with emotional and psychological trauma of the highest degree, arose triumphantly over death itself. Like Christ, I have been revived not only to survive but to thrive, having been transformed from victim to victor.

The true essence of who I am as a believer in Christ is expressed in Romans 8:37, the verse from which the subtitle of my forthcoming book based on my experience with cancer: Not Just a Survivor—More than a Conqueror:

Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him that loved us.

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors and gain an overwhelming victory through Him who loved us [so much that He died for us].

The expression “more than conquerors” is translated from the Greek verb hupernikao, a compound word with the prefix huper—a form of the same prefix found in “survive”—meaning over, beyond, above exceed, more than. Today, common expressions of the preposition would say “over and above” or “above and beyond.” The stem would be nikao, translated “to conquer, prevail, overcome, overpower, prevail.” Although translated as such, being “more than conquerors” or “super conquerors,” is not who we are, but it is what we do, how we live. We completely and overwhelmingly conqueror in the present tense with continuous action; we prevail mightily every day of our lives.

Each year I reflect with gratitude to God for being alive and being able to cherish another year of life. As is my tradition, I sometimes compose a poem of celebration on my birthday. Most remarkably, Romans 8:37 was the epigraph or introduction for a poem composed on my 74th birthday, expressing my new identity in light of the Word for the Day for Cancer Survivors Day:

Not Just a Survivor                     

 Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors

and gain an overwhelming victory through Him

who loved us [so much that He died for us].

Romans 8:37 (AMP)

 

Not just a survivor, more than a conqueror,

Defying the odds as a brave conquistador.

Despite intense pressure I learn to rest in grace,

More than enough to withstand the daily tests I face,

Not merely to survive but to thrive even more.

 

A mighty warrior, triumphant super-victor

With a cause, prepared not to die but to live for.

At times I fell behind but fought to keep the pace:

Not just a survivor, more than a conqueror.

 

To fulfill all the will of God and then to soar

To heights sublime where I have never been before.

Overcomer, bearing light in the darkest place,

I still fight the good fight, as I finish my race,

Moving forward, seeking to find the next open door:

Not just a survivor, more than a conqueror.

We close with the Rend Collection reinforcing the message “More than Conquerors”:

This post is actually taken from the final chapter of the forthcoming book. Not Just a Survivor—More than a Conqueror.  Go to lonnelledwardjohnson.com and subscribe to get more publication details. You can also get more details here at Dr. J’s Apothecary Shoppe. Not just on Cancer Survivors Day, but as believers, we are more than conquerors every day and in every way.

More than conquerors: What does it mean?

February 17, 2018

Verse of the Day for February 17, 2018 introduces a series of questions raised in Romans 8: beginning with verse 35, followed by verse 37 in the New International Version:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall trouble or hardship or persecution or famine or nakedness or danger or sword? No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us.

Here is the rendering in the New King James Version:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us.

If we add verse 36, we note a series of questions expressed this way in the Amplified Bible, Classic Edition:

35 Who shall ever separate us from Christ’s love? Shall suffering and affliction and tribulation? Or calamity and distress? Or persecution or hunger or destitution or peril or sword?
36 Who is there to condemn [us]? Will Christ Jesus (the Messiah), Who died, or rather Who was raised from the dead, Who is at the right hand of God actually pleading as He intercedes for us?

The passage culminates with a powerful response that thunders with the answer to this barrage of questions. The answer is more emphatic in other translations which begin with “No!” The familiar King James Version declares:

Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him that loved us.

The Phillips Translation puts it this way:

No, in all these things we win an overwhelming victory through him who has proved his love for us:

So says the New Living Translation:

No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us.

The response is definite and emphatic: No, absolutely not! No way, Jose! No! [Expletive deleted—No!] Paul goes on to close out this section to remind believers of who we are and whose we are and most importantly what we do:

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors and gain an overwhelming victory through Him who loved us [so much that He died for us].

The expression “more than conquerors” is translated from the Greek verb hupernikao, a compound word with the prefix huper—a form of the same prefix found in “super”—meaning over, beyond, above exceed, more than. Today, common expressions of the preposition would say “over and above” or “above and beyond.” The stem would be nikao, translated “to conquer, prevail, overcome, overpower, prevail.” Although translated as such, being “more than conquerors” or “super conquerors,” is not who we are, but it is what we do, how we live. We prevail completely in the present tense with continuous action; we prevail mightily every day of our lives: “In all these things we overwhelmingly conquer through Him who loved us.”

Romans 8:37 is the epigraph or introduction for this expression of our new identity in light of the Word for the Day:

Not Just Survivors

Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors
and gain an overwhelming victory through Him
who loved us [so much that He died for us].
Romans 8:37 (AMP)

Not just survivors, more than conquerors,
Defying the odds as brave conquistadors.
Despite intense pressure we learn to rest in grace,
More than enough to withstand the daily tests we face,
Not merely to survive but to thrive even more.

As mighty warriors, triumphant super victors
With a cause, prepared not to die but to live for.
At times we fell behind but fought to keep the pace:
Not just survivors, more than conquerors.
.

To fulfill all the will of God and then to soar
To heights sublime where we have never been before.
Overcomers, bearing light in the darkest place,
We still fight the good fight, as we finish our race,
Moving forward, seeking to find the next open door:
Not just survivors, more than conquerors.

The perfect music to accompany the Verse of the Day is “More than Conquerors” by the Rend Collection:

Not just survivors: More than conquerors

June 4, 2017

Romans 8--37

From time to time, instead of posting the Verse of the Day, I will offer comments under the Word for the Day. Such is the case today, having chosen to examine the word “survivor” and touch upon its meaning and personal application. The word is especially suited for June 4, 2017, which has been designated as National Cancer Survivors Day.

Observed annually on the first Sunday in June, National Cancer Survivors Day is set aside as a “Celebration of Life” for those who have survived a diagnosis of cancer. In events conducted in communities all over the nation and across the globe,  those who celebrate show the world that life after a cancer diagnosis can be fruitful and rewarding, whether a cancer survivor, family member, or medical professional.

In its most literal sense, the Word of the Day, survivor means “one who survives.” FreeDictionary.com offers this series of definitions of the verb “to survive” as a transitive verb, an action verb that has an object to receive its action. In this case, to survive cancer:

  1. To live longer than; outlive.
  2. To live, persist, or remain usable through any adverse situation.
  3. To cope with (a trauma or setback); persevere after.

The verb is derived from Latin: supervivere: combining the prefix super + vīvere, to live.

Having been diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2000, I have come to understand what it means to be a cancer survivor on a personal level. Within the past two years, I have become involved in helping to establish The Survivors Ministry at Christian Provision Ministries (CPM) in Sanford, NC. The overall vision for CPM is “Changing Lives and Building Communities.” This particular ministry seeks to accomplish this objective by providing support for those diagnosed with cancer, their family members, and others connected to these individuals.

“The Survivors Ministry” with its subtitle “Where recovery is glorified” provides a support system for those affected by cancer in an effort to improve their quality of life and reduce stress by accomplishing its objectives. Through this ministry and other connected support groups, I have grown in my understanding as to what it means to be a “survivor,” one who, after encountering an extremely adverse situation, is revived to not only survive but to thrive. Jesus Christ, the ultimate example of a “survivor,” endured the cross, despising the shame, and after undergoing unimaginable physical abuse, along with emotional and psychological trauma of the highest degree, arose triumphantly over death itself. Like Christ, we are revived not only to survive but to thrive, as we are transformed from victim to victor.

The true essence of who believers are in Christ is expressed in Romans 8:37(KJV):

Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him that loved us.

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

37 Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors and gain an overwhelming victory through Him who loved us [so much that He died for us].

The expression “more than conquerors” is translated from the Greek verb hupernikao, a compound word with the prefix huper—a form of the same prefix found in “survive”—meaning over, beyond, above exceed, more than. Today, common expressions of the preposition would say “over and above” or “above and beyond.” The stem would be nikao, translated “to conquer, prevail, overcome, overpower, prevail.” Although translated as such, being “more than conquerors” or “super conquerors,” is not who we are, but it is what we do, how we live. We completely and overwhelmingly conqueror in the present tense with continuous action; we prevail mightily every day of our lives.

Romans 8:37 is the epigraph or introduction for a poem expressing our new identity in light of the Word for the Day:

Not Just Survivors                     

 Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors

and gain an overwhelming victory through Him

who loved us [so much that He died for us].

Romans 8:37 (AMP)

 

Not just survivors, more than conquerors,

Defying the odds as brave conquistadors.

Despite intense pressure we learn to rest in grace,

More than enough to withstand the daily tests we face,

Not merely to survive but to thrive even more.

 

As mighty warriors, triumphant super victors

With a cause, prepared not to die but to live for.

At times we fell behind but fought to keep the pace:

Not just survivors, more than conquerors.

.

 

To fulfill all the will of God and then to soar

To heights sublime where we have never been before.

Overcomers, bearing light in the darkest place,

We still fight the good fight, as we finish our race,

Moving forward, seeking to find the next open door:

Not just survivors, more than conquerors.

The perfect music to complement to our celebration of National Cancer Survivors Day is “More than Conquerors” by the Rend Collection:

No, we overwhelmingly conquer

February 17, 2017

Romans 8--37

Verse of the Day for February 17, 2017 comes from a personal favorite passage found in Romans 8:35, 37 in the New King James Version:

Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us.

If we add verse 36, we note a series of questions expressed this way in the Amplified Bible, Classic Edition:

35 Who shall ever separate us from Christ’s love? Shall suffering and affliction and tribulation? Or calamity and distress? Or persecution or hunger or destitution or peril or sword?

36 Who is there to condemn [us]? Will Christ Jesus (the Messiah), Who died, or rather Who was raised from the dead, Who is at the right hand of God actually pleading as He intercedes for us?

The passage culminates with a powerful response that thunders with the answer to this barrage of questions. The answer is more emphatic in other translations which begin with “No!” The familiar King James Version declares:

Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him that loved us.

The Phillips Translation puts it this way:

No, in all these things we win an overwhelming victory through him who has proved his love for us:

So says the New Living Translation:

37 No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us.

The response is definite and emphatic: No, absolutely not! No way, Jose! No! [Expletive deleted—No!] Paul goes on to close out this section to remind believers of who we are and whose we are and most importantly what we do:

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

37 Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors and gain an overwhelming victory through Him who loved us [so much that He died for us].

The expression “more than conquerors” is translated from the Greek verb hupernikao, a compound word with the prefix huper—a form of the same prefix found in “super”—meaning over, beyond, above exceed, more than. Today, common expressions of the preposition would say “over and above” or “above and beyond.” The stem would be nikao, translated “to conquer, prevail, overcome, overpower, prevail.”  Although translated as such, being “more than conquerors” or “super conquerors,” is not who we are, but it is what we do, how we live. We prevail completely in the present tense with continuous action; we prevail mightily every day of our lives: “In all these things we overwhelmingly conquer through Him who loved us.”

Wayne Tate offers this powerful declaration found in Romans 8:35, 37-39:

Survivor: More than conqueror

June 5, 2016

Romans 8--37

From time to time, instead of posting the Verse of the Day, I will offer comments under the Word for the Day. Such is the case today, in that I have chosen to examine the word “survivor” and touch upon its meaning and personal application. The word is especially suited for June 5, 2016, which has been designated as National Cancer Survivors Day.

Here is the opening paragraph from an Examiner.com article highlighting this event:

Observed annually on the first Sunday in June, National Cancer Survivors Day is set aside as a “Celebration of Life” for those who have survived a diagnosis of cancer. In events conducted in communities all over the nation and across the globe,  those who celebrate show the world that life after a cancer diagnosis can be fruitful and rewarding, whether a cancer survivor, family member, or medical professional.

In its most literal sense, the Word of the Day, survivor means “one who survives.” FreeDictionary.com offers this series of definitions of the verb “to survive” as a transitive verb, an action verb that has an object to receive its action. In this case, to survive cancer:

  1. To live longer than; outlive.
  2. To live, persist, or remain usable through any adverse situation.
  3. To cope with (a trauma or setback); persevere after.

The verb is derived from Latin: supervivere: combining the prefix super + vīvere, to live; to live above and beyond.

Having been diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2000, I have come to understand what it means to be a cancer survivor on a personal level. Within the past year, I have become involved in helping to establish The Survivors Ministry at Christian Provision Ministries (CPM) in Sanford, NC. The overall vision for CPM is “Changing Lives and Building Communities.” This particular ministry seeks to accomplish this objective by providing support for those diagnosed with cancer, their family members and others connected to these individuals.

“The Survivors Ministry” with its subtitle “Where recovery is glorified” provides a support system for those affected by cancer in an effort to improve their quality of life and reduce stress by accomplishing its objectives. Through this ministry and other connected support groups, I have grown in my understanding as to what it means to be a “survivor,” one who, after encountering an extremely adverse situation, is revived to not only survive but to thrive. Jesus Christ, the ultimate example of a “survivor,” endured the cross, despising the shame, and after undergoing unimaginable physical abuse, along with emotional and psychological trauma of the highest degree, arose triumphantly over death itself. Like Christ, we are revived not only to survive but to thrive, as we are transformed from victim to victor.

The true essence of who believers are in Christ is expressed in Romans 8:37(KJV):

Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors, through him that loved us.

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

37 Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors and gain an overwhelming victory through Him who loved us [so much that He died for us].

The expression “more than conquerors” is translated from the Greek verb hupernikao, a compound word with the prefix huper—a form of the same prefix found in “survive”—meaning over, beyond, above exceed, more than. Today, common expressions of the preposition would say “over and above” or “above and beyond.” The stem would be nikao, translated “to conquer, prevail, overcome, overpower, prevail.” Although translated as such, being “more than conquerors” or “super conquerors,” is not who we are, but it is what we do, how we live. We completely and overwhelmingly conqueror in the present tense with continuous action, as we prevail mightily every day of our lives.

Wayne Huff offers this powerful declaration found in Romans 8:35, 37-39:

 

 

 

 

More than conquerors

February 17, 2016

Romans 8--37

Verse of the Day for February 17, 2016 comes from Romans 8:35, 37 in the Amplified Bible:

Who shall ever separate us from the love of Christ? Will tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or danger, or sword? Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors and gain an overwhelming victory through Him who loved us [so much that He died for us].

To more fully recognize the impact of these verses, we need to examine Romans 8:31-36 (NLT) before we look at verse 37:

31 What shall we say about such wonderful things as these? If God is for us, who can ever be against us? 32 Since he did not spare even his own Son but gave him up for us all, won’t he also give us everything else? 33 Who dares accuse us whom God has chosen for his own? No one—for God himself has given us right standing with himself. 34 Who then will condemn us? No one—for Christ Jesus died for us and was raised to life for us, and he is sitting in the place of honor at God’s right hand, pleading for us.
35 Can anything ever separate us from Christ’s love? Does it mean he no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger, or threatened with death? 36 (As the Scriptures say, “For your sake we are killed every day; we are being slaughtered like sheep.”

The passage comes from a section of Romans 8 emphasizing that there is “no separation in Christ” and that nothing can separate us from his love. These scriptures are presented as a barrage of questions culminating with a powerful response that thunders with the answer:

Romans 8:37

37 No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us.

The response is definite and emphatic: absolutely not! No way, Jose! No! [Expletive deleted—No!] “Overwhelming victory is ours,” the phrase that follows, is translated from the verb hupernikao. Using a verb indicates that in the midst of the most staggering, adverse circumstances that seek to limit or inhibit us or separate us from Christ who loved us, we conquer more and more as “super-conquerors,” achieving “overwhelming victory.”

From a recent blog entry “We choose to love” come the following comments on this passage from Romans 8 relating to the constancy of the love of God which never fails:

No matter the circumstances of our lives, whether on the pinnacles of success and dreams come true or in the pits of disappointment and failure, we are assured that God loves us and that His love endures. I recall a statement from the late Dr. Adrian Rodgers of Love Worth Finding Ministries: “God cannot love us any more than He does, and He will not love us any less.”

We find great assurance in comfort in the midst of the most distressing and oppressive times in which we live that nothing can separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus, our Lord.

We are encouraged by this powerful video from the Rend Collective who remind us that “We are More than Conquerors”: