Posts Tagged ‘Matthew 11:28’

I will give you rest

December 28, 2017

Matthew 11--28

The Verse of the Day for December 28, 2017 is found in Matthew 11: 28, but to better understand exactly what Jesus Christ is saying, we also need to examine verses 29 and 30 which close out the chapter.

Matthew 11:28-30:

28 Then Jesus said, “Come to me, all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. 29 Take my yoke upon you. Let me teach you, because I am humble and gentle at heart, and you will find rest for your souls. 30 For my yoke is easy to bear, and the burden I give you is light.”

Jesus Christ invites his followers, all those who work and are heavy laden, to enter “a place of quiet rest . . . near to the heart of God.” The Lord draws to himself those who are burdened with care, that they might find rest to their souls. In thinking about a place of rest from one’s labor, we recall the original intent of the Sabbath, first spoken of Genesis 2:1-3:

So the creation of the heavens and the earth and everything in them was completed. On the seventh day God had finished his work of creation, so he rested from all his work. And God blessed the seventh day and declared it holy, because it was the day when he rested from all his work of creation.

This passage in Genesis connects the Sabbath and the “seventh day” and “rest,” all terms derived from the Hebrew word Shabbat. Described as the centerpiece of Jewish life, Shabbat (the Sabbath) is designated as a day of rest and celebration beginning on Friday at sunset and ending on the following evening after nightfall.

The concept of the Sabbath comes to mind while reflecting on the Verse of Day and the following verses in Matthew 11:28-30.This particular passage also brings to mind the following lyrics:

We will Rest in the Lord

We will rest in the Lord. We will rest in Him.

No matter the challenge, we will put our trust in him.

Our desire is not just to be hearers

But also to be doers of the Word.

May we so live our lives to rest in the Lord.

 

Sometimes we carry a load that we are not meant to bear.

We fall beneath the burden and end up in despair.

Then we look unto Jesus, to lighten our load.

For he has said, “Come unto me. All ye that are heavy laden,

and I will give you rest, for my yoke is easy

and my burden is light.”

 

We will rest in the Lord. We will rest in him.

No matter the challenge, we will put our trust in Him.

Our desire is not just to be hearers

But also to be doers of the Word.

May we so live our lives to rest in the Lord.

As we come to the end of another year and prepare to embark upon the next phase of our journey, we are mindful of maintaining the balance between working and resting. In reflecting over the past year, I recognized  I worked harder and more often than I should have, relying on my own strength to overcome the challenges that confronted me, and I rested less than I could have. In the coming year my desire is to work less and rest more being assured that God, my Father, has promised to always be with me in the time of need.

The passage from Matthew 11:28-30 opens “I will rest in you” by Jaci Velasquez, who closes our discussion:

Another word for the weary

July 15, 2017

At the beginning of the New Year, a friend whom I had not corresponded with for decades reconnected and asked if I had a word of encouragement for one who is “weary.” In response to her request, several scriptures came to mind as well as previous blog posts with references to “the weary.” Here is an excerpt from that original post which serves a prelude to a new word of encouragement for the weary in this current season:

A verse that comes to mind as a source of encouragement from the words of the Lord Jesus Christ is found in Matthew 11:28 (Holman Christian Standard Bible):

“Come to Me, all of you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.

In thinking about Jesus Christ, remember this exhortation from Hebrews 13:2-3

2 Looking away [from all that will distract] to Jesus, Who is the Leader and the Source of our faith [giving the first incentive for our belief] and is also its Finisher [bringing it to maturity and perfection]. He, for the joy [of obtaining the prize] that was set before Him, endured the cross, despising and ignoring the shame, and is now seated at the right hand of the throne of God.
3 Just think of Him Who endured from sinners such grievous opposition and bitter hostility against Himself [reckon up and consider it all in comparison with your trials], so that you may not grow weary or exhausted, losing heart and relaxing and fainting in your minds.

From Galatians 6:9 (AMP) comes this encouragement:

And let us not lose heart and grow weary and faint in acting nobly and doing right, for in due time and at the appointed season we shall reap, if we do not loosen and relax our courage and faint.

This word is echoed in 2 Thessalonians 3:13 (AMPC)

And as for you, brethren, do not become weary or lose heart in doing right [but continue in well-doing without weakening].

One of my all-time favorite Old Testament passages related to being weary comes from Isaiah 40:28 31 (NLT):

28 Have you never heard?
Have you never understood?
The LORD is the everlasting God,
the Creator of all the earth.
He never grows weak or weary.
No one can measure the depths of his understanding.
29 He gives power to the weak
and strength to the powerless.
30 Even youths will become weak and tired,
and young men will fall in exhaustion.
31 But those who trust in the LORD will find new strength.
They will soar high on wings like eagles.
They will run and not grow weary.
They will walk and not faint.

I thought about these particular verses today, as I “happened upon” a poem that I had written years ago that could be viewed as a fresh word of exhortation for anyone who may have grown weary during the current season, the perilous times that some describe as a severe famine:

“Now there was famine in the land. . .”

Now there was a famine in the land, and Abram went down
into Egypt to live temporarily, for the famine in the land
was oppressive (intense and grievous.

Genesis 12:10 (AMP)

Although there may be many famines in the land,
We shall never want during times of scarcity,
But we survive and thrive, upheld by God’s right hand.
Anchored in the Word of God, as a seasoned tree
Planted by rivers of water with a tap root,
Even in times of drought our leaves still remain green
With bountiful harvests of spiritual fruit.
Each day we walk by faith and not by what is seen.
Though we may falter, we still strive to do our best.
For the faithful and loyal, those called to obey,
Those created in righteousness and set apart,
This time of extreme lack is yet another test.
In famine we will trust and not seek our own way,
Never yearning to return to Egypt in our heart.
As we follow God and pursue His righteous ways,
We will be strong and wise and prosper all our days.

May these words offer strength to those who may feel weary, knowing that God promises to renew our strength, as we wait upon Him. Esther Mui offers this comforting reminder: Isaiah 40:25-31 Song “Those Who Wait on the LORD.”

Word to the weary

January 9, 2017

isaiah-50-4

As we move into the second week of the New Year, I wanted to share a response to a friend who asked if I had a word of encouragement for one who is “weary.” In thinking about “a word to the weary,” several scriptures came to mind as well as a previous blog post that also made reference to “the weary.” Today’s entry combines those two elements in a fresh word of exhortation for anyone who at any time, particularly lately, may have grown tired and weary.
First of all, the topic brought to mind this verse from the Amplified Bible, Classic Edition:

Isaiah 50:4

[The Servant of God says] The Lord God has given Me the tongue of a disciple and of one who is taught, that I should know how to speak a word in season to him who is weary. He wakens Me morning by morning, He wakens My ear to hear as a disciple [as one who is taught].

Another verse also comes to mind as a source of encouragement from the words of the Lord Jesus Christ found in Matthew 11:28 (Holman Christian Standard Bible):

“Come to Me, all of you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.

In thinking about Jesus Christ, remember this exhortation from Hebrews 13:2-3

2 Looking away [from all that will distract] to Jesus, Who is the Leader and the Source of our faith [giving the first incentive for our belief] and is also its Finisher [bringing it to maturity and perfection]. He, for the joy [of obtaining the prize] that was set before Him, endured the cross, despising and ignoring the shame, and is now seated at the right hand of the throne of God.
3 Just think of Him Who endured from sinners such grievous opposition and bitter hostility against Himself [reckon up and consider it all in comparison with your trials], so that you may not grow weary or exhausted, losing heart and relaxing and fainting in your minds.

Finally, from Galatians 6:9 (AMPC):

And let us not lose heart and grow weary and faint in acting nobly and doing right, for in due time and at the appointed season we shall reap, if we do not loosen and relax our courage and faint.

This word is echoed in 2 Thessalonians 3:13 (AMPC)

And as for you, brethren, do not become weary or lose heart in doing right [but continue in well-doing without weakening].

Another Old Testament passage related to being weary comes from Isaiah 40:28 31(NLT):

28 Have you never heard?
Have you never understood?
The LORD is the everlasting God,
the Creator of all the earth.
He never grows weak or weary.
No one can measure the depths of his understanding.
29 He gives power to the weak
and strength to the powerless.
30 Even youths will become weak and tired,1
and young men will fall in exhaustion.
31 But those who trust in the LORD will find new strength.
They will soar high on wings like eagles.
They will run and not grow weary.
They will walk and not faint.

During this intense time of transition, as believers move forward, going from faith to faith, from glory to glory, and from victory to victory, we all can grow weary to the point of utter exhaustion as we strive toward the next level of excellence in our lives. The words that we need to undergird and support us come from the Word of God. God, our faithful Father, is always speaking, but we may not always be listening. As children of God, we need to tune our ears to hear to word of God. The opening verse of our discussion comes from Isaiah 50:4 which is part of the introduction to this poetic exhortation that as believers we must develop:

The Art of Listening

God has something to say to you,
God has something to say.
Listen, Listen, Pay close attention.
God has something to say.

Children’s Song

The Lord GOD has given Me
The tongue of the learned,
That I should know how to speak
A word in season to him who is weary.
He awakens Me morning by morning,
He awakens My ear
To hear as the learned.
The Lord GOD has opened My ear;
And I was not rebellious,
Nor did I turn away.

Isaiah 50:4-5

Listen, listen, dear ones; hear with the inner ear.
Tune your ears to hear in the center of your heart.
I will whisper cherished secrets as you come near.
To listen intently and obey is an art,
Practiced and perfected day by day.
As you hide my Word in the center of your heart,
I perform and bring to pass each word that I say.
In my unfolding Kingdom, you too have a part,
For to walk in love is the more excellent way.
Partake of my promises and consume my Word.
As precious as life-giving water, hold it dear
And do my will, proving all things that you have heard.
Listen intently and obey: Perfect this art.
Listen, listen, dear ones; hear with the inner ear.

We conclude with Mercy Me offering “Word of God Speak”:

As we press further into the New Year, let us not be weary in well doing but perfect the “Art of Listening” in “2017, the best year we have ever seen.”

Rest in the Lord

December 28, 2016

Matthew 11--28

Revised and re-posted from a previous blog entry, the Verse of the Day for December 28, 2016 is found in Matthew 11: 28, but to better understand exactly what Jesus Christ is saying, we also need to examine verses 29 and 30 which close out the chapter.

Matthew 11:28-30 (AMP):

28 “Come to Me, all who are weary and heavily burdened [by religious rituals that provide no peace], and I will give you rest [refreshing your souls with salvation]. 29 Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me [following Me as My disciple], for I am gentle and humble in heart, and YOU WILL FIND REST (renewal, blessed quiet) FOR YOUR SOULS. 30 For My yoke is easy [to bear] and My burden is light.”

Jesus Christ invites his followers, all those who work and are heavy laden, to enter “a place of quiet rest . . . near to the heart of God.” The Lord draws to himself those who are burdened with care, that they might find rest to their souls. In thinking about a place of rest from one’s labor, we recall the original intent of the Sabbath, first spoken of Genesis 2:1-3:

So the creation of the heavens and the earth and everything in them was completed. 2 On the seventh day God had finished his work of creation, so he rested from all his work. 3 And God blessed the seventh day and declared it holy, because it was the day when he rested from all his work of creation.

This passage in Genesis connects the Sabbath and the “seventh day” and “rest,” all terms derived from the Hebrew word Shabbat. Described as the centerpiece of Jewish life, Shabbat (the Sabbath) is designated as a day of rest and celebration beginning on Friday at sunset and ending on the following evening after nightfall.

The concept of the Sabbath comes to mind while reflecting on the Verse of Day and the following verses in Matthew 11:28-30.This particular passage is the inspiration for the following original song in response to the invitation offered by the Lord:

I Will Rest in the Lord

I will rest in the Lord. I will rest in him.
No matter the challenge, I will put my trust in him.
My desire is not just to be a hearer
But also to be a doer of the Word.
May I so live my life to rest in the Lord.

Sometimes I carry a load that I’m not meant to bear.
I fall beneath the burden that could lead to despair.
Then I look unto Jesus, to lighten my load.
For he has said, “Come unto me. All ye that are heavy laden,
and I will give you rest, for my yoke is easy
and my burden is light.”

I will rest in the Lord. I will rest in him.
No matter the challenge, I will put my trust in him.
My desire is not just to be a hearer
But also to be a doer of the Word.
May I so live my life to rest in the Lord.

In bringing closure to this year while reflecting upon the triumphs and challenges of 2016, I recognize that countless times I have worked much more that I should have and rested far less than I could have. In looking forward to the New Year with fresh possibilities, I am determined more consistently “to rest in the Lord.”

Reggie and Ladye Love Smith offer a song of encouragement to round out our discussion of words of Jesus Christ in Matthew 11:28-30: “I will give you rest.”

This is the rest: Enter in

December 28, 2014

Matthew 11--28

The Verse of the Day for December 28, 2014 is found in Matthew 11: 28, but to better understand exactly what Jesus Christ is saying, we also need to examine verses 29 and 30 which close out the chapter.

Matthew 11:28-30:

28 Then Jesus said, “Come to me, all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. 29 Take my yoke upon you. Let me teach you, because I am humble and gentle at heart, and you will find rest for your souls. 30 For my yoke is easy to bear, and the burden I give you is light.”

Jesus Christ invites his followers, all those who work and are heavy laden, to enter “a place of quiet rest . . . near to the heart of God.” The Lord draws to himself those who are burdened with care, that they might find rest to their souls. In thinking about a place of rest from one’s labor, we recall the original intent of the Sabbath, first spoken of Genesis 2:1-3:

So the creation of the heavens and the earth and everything in them was completed. On the seventh day God had finished his work of creation, so he rested from all his work. And God blessed the seventh day and declared it holy, because it was the day when he rested from all his work of creation.

This passage in Genesis connects the Sabbath and the “seventh day” and “rest,” all terms derived from the Hebrew word Shabbat. Described as the centerpiece of Jewish life, Shabbat (the Sabbath) is designated as a day of rest and celebration beginning on Friday at sunset and ending on the following evening after nightfall.

The concept of the Sabbath comes to mind while reflecting on the Verse of Day and the following verses in Matthew 11:28-30.This particular passage is the inspiration for the following original song:

This Is the Rest

This is the rest, wherein He shall cause the weary to rest.

Enter in and cease from your labor.

This is the rest, come in, partake of His promises.

This is the rest, come in, be refreshed in the Lord.

 

Jesus said come unto to me,

All ye that are heavy laden.

Take my yoke upon and learn of me,

For I am meek and lowly of heart.

And ye shall find rest, rest unto your souls.

 

This is the rest, wherein He shall cause the weary to rest.

Enter in and cease from your labor.

This is the rest, come in, partake of His promises.

This is the rest, come in, be refreshed in the Lord.

Reggie and Ladye Love Smith offer a song to round out our discussion of words of Jesus Christ in Matthew 11:28-30: “I will give you rest.”