Posts Tagged ‘Luke 19:10’

Rescued from the Lost and Found

April 27, 2021

The blog entry for the Verse of the Day for April 27, 2021 is a revision of a previous post based on  Luke 19:10 in the Amplified Bible:

For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.

In fact, in Luke 15 we find three parables related to lost items: “The Parable of the Lost Sheep”, “The Parable of the Lost Coin”, and “The Parable of the Prodigal Son.” In each instance, something is lost, and when it is found there is great celebration and rejoicing.

In the first account, a man has 100 sheep, and one is lost. The man leaves the ninety-nine and diligently pursues the lost sheep until he finds it and returns home.

Luke 15:6 (AMP)

And when he gets home, he calls together his friends and his neighbors, saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, because I have found my lost sheep!’

Similarly, Luke 15:8-9 describes another lost item and finding it.

 [The Lost Coin] “Or what woman, if she has ten silver coins [each one equal to a day’s wages] and loses one coin, does not light a lamp and sweep the house and search carefully until she finds it?

And when he gets home, he calls together his friends and his neighbors, saying to them, ‘Rejoice with me, because I have found my lost sheep!’

At the end of the Parable of the Prodigal Son, the third instance of a lost item, the father responds to his resentful son who stayed behind while his younger brother “squandered his substance in riotous living”:

Luke 15:32b

. . . for thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.

At the end of this moving account, the forgiving father “spread the welcome table and had a family feast. . .” and in Luke 15:24 proclaims:

For this son of mine was [as good as] dead and is alive again; he was lost and has been found.’ So they began to celebrate.

These three accounts of lost items remind of us our state before the Lord Jesus Christ rescued us from the “Lost and Found” of this world. Every believer is deposited as lost property awaiting retrieval by our rightful owner. We are eternally grateful that Jesus Christ, our Lord and Savior, came to seek and to save the Lord. The lyrics to “I’m forever Grateful” express our thoughts:

To seek and to save the lost: The prodigal son

April 27, 2016

Luke 19_10

The Verse of the Day for April 27, 2016 is taken from Luke 19:10 (KJV):

For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.

In reflecting on this verse, I thought of a similar expression that comes at the end of the Parable of the Prodigal Son, as the father responds to his resentful son who stayed behind while his younger brother “squandered his substance in riotous living”:

Luke 15:32b:

. . . for thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.

In Luke 15 we find three parables related to lost items: “The Parable of the Lost Sheep”, “The Parable of the Lost Coin”, and “The Parable of the Prodigal Son.” That particular parable is a favorite of mine, and I recall also seeing for the first time the Rembrandt portrait of the Prodigal Son which moved me in a most remarkable manner.

Rembrandt's Return_of_the_Prodigal_Son

I have personalized and poetically expressed my identification with the Prodigal Son, who is impacted and forever changed by the compassion of his “Forgiving Father,” the “Real Hero” of the passage. Each time I read this account, I think of this piece:

Homecoming

The Parable of the Prodigal Son
Luke 15:11-32

I prodigalled
and partied
and boogied my
nights away.

I humped and bumped
and stumbled
till I found myself
in a ditch.

I squandered all
of my bread,
down to my
very last crumb.

I had no friends
to turn to
I had no place to go
but home.

I tried to sneak back
unnoticed,
but Daddy ran
to meet me
and greet me with
open arms
(like I’d been down
the road apiece,
or just got
back from town,
or never been
gone at all).

He didn’t ask me
where I’d been,
didn’t ask how
much I’d spent.

He forgave me,
just forgot
all the times I’d
plumb missed the mark.

He spread the
welcome table
and had a
family feast
to satisfy
my hunger
and meet my
every need.

Later on in the
midnight peace
when Pa and I
were alone,
we said nothing,
yet so much;
then through tears
of joy he said,

“It’s all right, son–
it’s all right, now.”

Listen to this moving rendition of “Prodigal” by Casting Crowns:

A reminder: Jesus saves

April 26, 2016

 

Hebrews 7--25

From Hebrews 7:25 (KJV) comes the Verse of the Day for April 26, 2016:

Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.

The Amplified Bible offers this powerful rendering:

Therefore He is able also to save to the uttermost (completely, perfectly, finally, and for all time and eternity) those who come to God through Him, since He is always living to make petition to God and intercede with Him and intervene for them.

This verse makes known Jesus Christ is a complete Savior, who fulfills his purpose as the Son of God:

For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost (Luke 19:10)

The Psalmist offers these comforting words to remind us of God’s faithfulness to rescue those who are lost:

Psalm 31:8

And hast not shut me up into the hand of the enemy: thou hast set my feet in a large room.

Psalm 106:10

And he saved them from the hand of him that hated them, and redeemed them from the hand of the enemy.

Psalm 107:2

Let the redeemed of the Lord say so, whom he hath redeemed from the hand of the enemy;

In thinking about Jesus Christ who saves to the uttermost, I recall a blog entry where I commented on our being rescued from a “horrible pit.” What follows is an excerpt from the post entitled “There is no pit so deep. . .”

A couple of days ago, I read a commentary regarding Corrie ten Boom and her sister Betsy, who were imprisoned in Nazi concentration camps because they helped Jews to escape in Holland. They found themselves in a horrible situation, in a deep pit, and Betsy’s last words before she died spoke of hope, even in a most difficult situation. Corrie ten Boom, was later rescued and gave her testimony of the amazing power of God’s love that sustained her over the years of her life. Betsy said these words which became the opening line and the title of the following poem:

“There is no pit so deep. . .”

“There is no pit so deep that He is not deeper still.”
Betsy ten Boom

He also brought me up out of a horrible pit,
Out of the miry clay, and set my feet upon a rock,
and established my steps.

Psalm 40:2

“There is no pit so deep that He is not deeper still.”
In times of turmoil and deep distress we rest until
We see that God’s Word comes to pass, for we have no doubt
That He will again deliver us and bring us out
With renewed strength to climb an even steeper hill.

We are assured that every promise God will fulfill.
When we are exhausted, God will refresh and refill.
No matter how severe the problem we thought about,
“There is no pit so deep. . .”

Despite our best efforts, at times life goes all downhill.
In times of despair we seek courage and strength to instill,
As we persevere to triumph along this treacherous route.
Rooted and grounded, we are no longer tossed about.
We remember these words as we strive to fulfill God’s will:
“There is no pit so deep. . .”

Travis Cottrell reminds us “Jesus Saves,” the essence of the message of the Verse of the Day:

Lost and found: Parable of the Prodigal Son

April 27, 2015

Luke 19_10

Luke 19:10 NLT

For the Son of Man came to seek and save those who are lost.”

The Verse of the Day for April 27, 2015 was originally posted a year ago and has been modified and reposted below:

Rembrandt's Return_of_the_Prodigal_Son As I reflected upon the Verse of the Day, I thought of the parables of the lost recorded in Luke 15: “The Parable of the Lost Sheep”, “The Parable of the Lost Coin” and “The Parable of the Prodigal Son.” I recall seeing for the first time the Rembrandt portrait of the Prodigal Son which moved me in a most remarkable manner. That particular parable is a favorite of mine, and I have personalized and poetically expressed my identification with the Prodigal Son who is impacted and forever changed by the compassion of his “Forgiving Father,” the “Real Hero” of the passage. Each time I read this account, I think of this poetic rendering:

Homecoming

The Parable of the Prodigal Son

Luke 15:11-32

I prodigalled

and partied

and boogied my

nights away.

I humped and bumped

and stumbled

till I found myself

in a ditch.

I squandered all

of my bread,

down to my

very last crumb.

I had no friends

to turn to

I had no place to go

but home.

I tried to sneak back

unnoticed,

but Daddy ran

to meet me

and greet me with

open arms

(like I’d been down

the road apiece,

or just got

back from town,

or never been

gone at all).

He didn’t ask me

where I’d been,

didn’t ask how

much I’d spent.

He forgave me,

just forgot

all the times I’d

plumb missed the mark.

He spread the

welcome table

and had a

family feast

to satisfy

my hunger

and meet my

every need.

Later on in the

midnight peace

when Pa and I

were alone,

we said nothing,

yet so much;

then through tears

of joy he said,

“It’s all right, son–

it’s all right, now.”

One of the songs that comes to mind in thinking about “that which was lost” is the most celebrated hymn of the Christian Church, “Amazing Grace” with the opening stanza:

Amazing grace, how sweet the sound

That saved a wretch like me.

I once was lost, but now I’m found.

Was blind but now I see.

Listen to this moving rendition of the classic hymn sung by Wintley Phipps.

The forgiving Father receives the Prodigal Son

April 27, 2014

Rembrandt's Return_of_the_Prodigal_Son

Luke 19_10

As I reflected upon the Verse of the Day for April 27, 2014, I thought of three parables of “lost” items recorded in Luke 15: “The Parable of the Lost Sheep” –Luke 15:3-7; “The Parable of the Lost Coin”—Luke 15:8-10 and “The Parable of the Prodigal Son”—Luke 15:11-32. I recall seeing for the first time the Rembrandt portrait of the “Return of the Prodigal Son” which moved me in a most remarkable manner. That particular parable is a favorite of mine, and I have personalized and poetically expressed my identification with the Prodigal Son, who is impacted and forever changed by the compassion of his “Forgiving Father,” the “Real Hero” of the passage. Each time I read this account, I think of this poetic rendering:

 Homecoming

The Parable of the Prodigal Son

Luke 15:11-32

 

I prodigalled

and partied

and boogied my

nights away.

 

I humped and bumped

and stumbled

till I found myself

in a ditch.

 

I squandered all

of my bread,

down to my

very last crumb.

 

I had no friends

to turn to

I had no place to go

but home.

 

I tried to sneak back

unnoticed,

but Daddy ran

to meet me

and greet me with

open arms

(like I’d been down

the road apiece,

or just got

back from town,

or never been

gone at all).

 

He didn’t ask me

where I’d been,

didn’t ask how

much I’d spent.

 

He forgave me,

just forgot

all the times I’d

plumb missed the mark.

 

He spread the

welcome table

and had a

family feast

to satisfy

my hunger

and meet my

every need.

 

Later on in the

midnight peace

when Pa and I

were alone,

we said nothing,

yet so much;

then through tears

of joy he said,

 

“It’s all right, son–

it’s all right, now.”

The song that comes to mind in thinking about “that which was lost” is the ever-popular “Amazing Grace” with the opening stanza:

 Amazing grace, how sweet the sound

That saved a wretch like me.

I once was lost, but now I’m found.

Was blind but now I see.

Recorded countless times, without a doubt “Amazing Grace” has become one of the most recognized musical compositions in the English language. Listen as Wintley Phipps gives the history of song and closes with an unforgettable rendition of the most popular hymn of all time.

Jesus, our savior to the uttermost

April 26, 2014

Hebrews-7 25

Wherefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them. Hebrews 7:25 KJV

The Amplified Bible offers this powerful rendering of the Verse of the Day for April 26, 2014:

Therefore He is able also to save to the uttermost (completely, perfectly, finally, and for all time and eternity) those who come to God through Him, since He is always living to make petition to God and intercede with Him and intervene for them.

This verse makes known that Jesus Christ is a complete Savior, who fulfills his purpose as the Son of God:

For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost (Luke 19:10)

The Psalmist offers these comforting words to remind us of God’s faithfulness to rescue those who are lost:

Psalm 31:8

And hast not shut me up into the hand of the enemy: thou hast set my feet in a large room.

Psalm 106:10

And he saved them from the hand of him that hated them, and redeemed them from the hand of the enemy.

Psalm 107:2

Let the redeemed of the Lord say so, whom he hath redeemed from the hand of the enemy;

In thinking about Jesus Christ who saves to the uttermost, I recall a blog entry where I commented on our being rescued from a “horrible pit.” What follows is an excerpt from the post entitled “There is no pit so deep. . .”

A couple of days ago, I read a commentary regarding Corrie ten Boom and her sister Betsy, who were imprisoned in Nazi concentration camps because they helped Jews to escape in Holland. They found themselves in a horrible situation, in a deep pit, and Betsy’s last words before she died spoke of hope, even in a most difficult situation. Corrie ten Boom, was later rescued and gave her testimony of the amazing power of God’s love that sustained her over the years of her life. Betsy said these words which became the opening line and the title of the following poem:

 “There is no pit so deep. . .”

 

“There is no pit so deep that He is not deeper still.”

Betsy ten Boom

 

He also brought me up out of a horrible pit,
Out of the miry clay, and set my feet upon a rock,
and established my steps.

Psalm 40:2              

            

“There is no pit so deep that He is not deeper still.”

In times of turmoil and deep distress we rest until

We see that God’s Word comes to pass, for we have no doubt

That He will again deliver us and bring us out

With renewed strength to climb an even steeper hill.

 

We are assured that every promise God will fulfill.

When we are exhausted, God will refresh and refill.

No matter how severe the problem we thought about,

“There is no pit so deep. . .”

 

Despite our best efforts, at times life goes all downhill.

In times of despair we seek courage and strength to instill,

As we persevere to triumph along this treacherous route.

Rooted and grounded, we are no longer tossed about.

We remember these words as we strive to fulfill God’s will:

“There is no pit so deep. . .”

 

As I was growing up, I recall the song “He Brought Me Out” performed here as a congregational hymn from the Church of God, a suitable way to close out this blog entry.