Posts Tagged ‘John 10:7’

Life, more abundant life

December 5, 2017

John 10--10

The Verse of the Day for December 5, 2017 offers another metaphor used by Jesus Christ to help his followers understand who he and why he came on the scene:

John 10:7, 9-10 (AMP):

So Jesus said again, “I assure you and most solemnly say to you, I am the Door for the sheep [leading to life]. I am the Door; anyone who enters through Me will be saved [and will live forever], and will go in and out [freely], and find pasture (spiritual security). The thief comes only in order to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have and enjoy life, and have it in abundance [to the full, till it overflows].

He begins by describing himself as the door or gate to the sheep that serves a dual purpose.  Such a gate or door can be used to keep enemies or those with harmful motives from entering the sheepfold. It can also be used to keep the sheep within the confines of safety.  The passage goes on to contrast the “thief” who comes with ill intent and attempts “to steal and to kill and to destroy the flock.” On the other hand, the Lord Jesus Christ comes not only to give life but more abundant life,

Verse 10 also brings to mind the Hebrew expression L’Chaim, literally meaning “to life!” The phrase is often used as a toast to celebrate a special occasion. L’Chaim reveals a great deal about the Jewish approach to life. The phrase is not to a good life, to a healthy life, or even to a long life. It is simply “to Life!”, recognizing that life is, indeed, good and precious and should always be celebrated and savored. According to a noted Rabbi, “L’Chaim” does not just mean “to life” as it is commonly translated, but “to lives”—to life in the plural: overflowing cup life, “bright and bubbly, doubly lovely,” life in all of its fullness.

John 10:10 serves as the epigraph or opening scripture for the following poetic expression:

Life

The thief does not come except to steal,

and to kill, and to destroy.

I have come that they may have life,

and that they may have it more abundantly

John 10:10

 

From the fountain, never-ending waters of life,

Countless blessings flow from the one who lives and gives

Wisdom, knowledge, understanding and new meaning

That we might conquer the last enemy called death

And know exceeding great and precious promises

Of His kingdom, ruled by righteousness, joy and peace.

 

Surpassing all our understanding is His peace,

Refreshing cool water from the river of life

To satisfy and fulfill all His promises:

The everlasting portion of the grace that gives

Beauty for ashes to resurrect life from death

And unfold mysteries to give life true meaning.

 

Along the journey, each soul seeks to find meaning,

To sail through the storms of life to a place of peace,

To walk through the valley of the shadow of death.

Every page recorded by the author of life

Speaks of the comfort and assurance that He gives

To all who decide to believe His promises.

 

Far beyond earthly treasures are God’s promises

To His dear children who come to know the meaning

Of true love from our most gracious Father, who gives

His spirit to season our speech with words of peace.

To minister to one another, to speak life:

In the tongue is the power of both life and death.

 

We know nothing separates us, not even death,

For God’s love still gives birth to untold promises

That we might be changed and walk in newness of life.

We strive to know God’s ways, understand their meaning.

To know the depths of boundless grace, mercy and peace

And endless love that empties itself yet still gives.

 

Our lives illumined with the light only He gives

To dispel darkness and nullify even death,

To brighten the way and lighten our paths with peace,

That we might stand upon abundant promises,

That enlighten us to understand the meaning

Of our fully partaking of the Bread of Life.

 

The faithful God who gives will keep His promises.

Even death can never alter the real meaning

Of perfect peace that leads to everlasting life.

We close with this lively musical rendering of John 10:10: “I have come”

I am the door of the sheep

December 5, 2016

john-10-10

The Verse of the Day for December 5, 2016 offers another metaphorical statement by Jesus Christ about himself:

John 10:7, 9-10 in the New King James Version:

[Jesus the Good Shepherd] Then Jesus said to them again, “Most assuredly, I say to you, I am the door of the sheep. I am the door. If anyone enters by Me, he will be saved, and will go in and out and find pasture. The thief does not come except to steal, and to kill, and to destroy. I have come that they may have life, and that they may have it more abundantly.

Providentially, Bishop Charles Mellette of Christian Provision Ministries in Sanford, NC has been ministering with a teaching series “Hearing the Voice of God” based on this same passage. His objective has been to teach that hearing the voice of God should be a lifestyle.

A previous blog entry notes that this particular passage speaks of Jesus Christ as the gate or door of the sheep which serves a dual purpose.  Such a gate or door can be used to keep enemies or those with harmful intents from entering the sheepfold. It can also be used to keep the sheep within the confines of safety. Ron Graham elaborates on this reference:

A ‘Sheepfold’ is a secure walled enclosure in which sheep are penned when not out to pasture in care of the shepherd. The sheepfold might be a permanent barn-like enclosure for shelter, an outdoor holding pen with stone walls, or a makeshift barricade of briars and crisscrossed pointed sticks. A single narrow opening was provided for entry and exit. If there was no secure door or gate, a keeper would guard the entrance or at night sleep across it. The purpose of the sheepfold was to keep the flock together, keep out wolves or dogs, and to make it difficult for thieves or vandals to steal or harm the sheep. A flock of sheep is a very valuable but vulnerable asset. A good shepherd knows and loves his sheep and guards them with his life against all predators. He keeps his flock together and fetches back any sheep that stray. A sheepfold was necessary for the protection of the flock.

farmyard-gate

The photo of a farmyard gate shows sheep quietly gazing on the other side of the entrance. Similarly, Jesus describes himself as a door or gate to the sheep.

The Sheep Gate is also mentioned in the rebuilding of the wall and the gates at Jerusalem during the time of Nehemiah. A teaching series on the gates of Jerusalem was the inspiration for this poem which comes to mind while thinking of John 10:

At the Sheep Gate

 I am the good shepherd; and I know My sheep,

and am known by My own

As the Father knows Me,

 even so I know the Father;

 and I lay down My life for the sheep.

John 10:14-15

 

Here stands a company of priests, a holy nation,

Those called, chosen and set apart faithfully to serve,

To restore the sacred place of adoration.

Our lives have become open books for all to observe.

Even as priests prepared the altar of sacrifice,

We commit our lives to serve the Lord and vow to keep

Our covenant both with God and with one another.

As the Good Shepherd lays down his life for the sheep,

We are willing to give our lives for a sister or brother.

We have been sent to the sheepfold to guard and protect

Indeed, we are willing to pay the ultimate price

To follow Christ that our love might be made perfect.

At the Sheep Gate God first speaks that His will might be known:

That shepherds with His heart should serve and preserve His own.

We close with this lively musical rendering of John 10:10: “I have come”

I am the door: another metaphor

December 5, 2015

John 10--7-8

Revised and re-posted from a year ago, the Verse of the Day for December 5, 2015 provides another metaphorical statement by Jesus Christ about himself where he relates to being the gate or door of the sheep:

John 10:7, 9-10 (AMP)

So Jesus said again, “I assure you and most solemnly say to you, I am the Door for the sheep [leading to life]. I am the Door; anyone who enters through Me will be saved [and will live forever], and will go in and out [freely], and find pasture (spiritual security). The thief comes only in order to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have and enjoy life, and have it in abundance [to the full, till it overflows].

The door or gate to the sheep serves a dual purpose. Such a gate or door can be used to keep enemies or those with harmful intents from entering the sheepfold. It can also be used to keep the sheep within the confines of safety. Ron Graham elaborates on this reference:

A ‘Sheepfold’ is a secure walled enclosure in which sheep are penned when not out to pasture in care of the shepherd. The sheepfold might be a permanent barn-like enclosure for shelter, an outdoor holding pen with stone walls, or a makeshift barricade of briars and crisscrossed pointed sticks. A single narrow opening was provided for entry and exit. If there was no secure door or gate, a keeper would guard the entrance or at night sleep across it. The purpose of the sheepfold was to keep the flock together, keep out wolves or dogs, and to make it difficult for thieves or vandals to steal or harm the sheep. A flock of sheep is a very valuable but vulnerable asset. A good shepherd knows and loves his sheep and guards them with his life against all predators. He keeps his flock together and fetches back any sheep that stray. A sheepfold was necessary for the protection of the flock.

Farmyard GateThe photo of a farmyard gate shows sheep quietly grazing on the other side of the entrance. Similarly, Jesus describes himself as a door or gate to the sheep.
The Sheep Gate is also mentioned in the rebuilding of the wall and the gates at Jerusalem during the time of Nehemiah. A teaching series on the gates of Jerusalem was the inspiration for this poem which comes to mind while thinking of John 10:

At the Sheep Gate

I am the good shepherd; and I know My sheep,
and am known by My own
As the Father knows Me,
even so I know the Father;
and I lay down My life for the sheep.

John 10:14-15

Here stands a company of priests, a holy nation,
Those called, chosen and set apart faithfully to serve,
To restore the sacred place of adoration.
Our lives have become open books for all to observe.
Even as priests prepared the altar of sacrifice,
We commit our lives to serve the Lord and vow to keep
Our covenant both with God and with one another.
As the Good Shepherd lays down his life for the sheep,
We are willing to give our lives for a sister or brother.
We have been sent to the sheepfold to guard and protect
Indeed, we are willing to pay the ultimate price
To follow Christ that our love might be made perfect.
At the Sheep Gate God first speaks that His will might be known:
That shepherds with His heart should serve and preserve His own.

We close with this lively musical rendering of John 10:10: “I have come”

The Good Shepherd: one more metaphor

December 6, 2014

John 10--14

Some of the recent Verses of the Day have been taken from passages that reveal seven metaphors spoken by Jesus, all of which occur in the Gospel of John. In these scriptural references the Lord attempts to describe himself in order to help his listeners to understand better who he is. Metaphors provide direct comparisons between two subjects, in an effort to paint a vivid mind picture of one object in terms of the other.

The Verse of the Day for December 6, 2014 is one of two references to the Good Shepherd, and it is modified and re-posted below:

John 10:14-15 (NLT):

“I am the good shepherd; I know my own sheep, and they know me, just as my Father knows me and I know the Father. So I sacrifice my life for the sheep.

The accompanying video dramatizes the words of the Son of God spoken in John 10:1-18 from which the description of “the good shepherd” is taken:

Some of the specific qualities of “the good shepherd” can be found in Psalm 23, one of the most recognized and recited passages from the Book of Psalms:

The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.
He makes me to lie down in green pastures; He leads me beside the still waters.
 He restores my soul; He leads me in the paths of righteousness for His name’s sake.

 Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
I will fear no evil; for You are with me;
Your rod and Your staff, they comfort me.

 You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies;
You anoint my head with oil; my cup runs over.
 Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life;
And I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.

The second metaphorical reference to Jesus states, “I am the good Shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.” This indicates that the shepherd is fully committed to his sheep and consequently has their full trust. The good shepherd cares so much for his sheep that he is even willing to lay down his life for the sheep, as this phrase is used three times in the sheepfold discourse.

The accompanying painting by 19th Century German artist Bernard Plockhorst depicts the Good Shepherd whose sheep follow Him willingly and eagerly because he is willing to do anything for their well being, even if it means laying down his own life.

The accompanying painting by 19th Century German artist Bernard Plockhorst depicts the Good Shepherd whose sheep follow Him willingly and eagerly because he is willing to do anything for their well being, even if it means laying down his own life.

The following video by Scott Krippayne provides a graphic and musical illustration of Psalm 23:

It is certainly comforting to know that the Lord, indeed, is our shepherd and that he is a good one.

Fernando Ortega sings of “The Good Shepherd”:

Yes, I am the gate

December 5, 2014

John 10--7-8The Verse of the Day provides another metaphorical statement by Jesus Christ about himself where he relates to being the gate or door of the sheep:

John 10:7, 9-10 (NLT):

So he explained it to them: “I tell you the truth, I am the gate for the sheep.

Yes, I am the gate. Those who come in through me will be saved. They will come and go freely and will find good pastures.

The thief’s purpose is to steal and kill and destroy. My purpose is to give them a rich and satisfying life.

The door or gate to the sheep serves a dual purpose. Such a gate or door can be used to keep enemies or those with harmful intents from entering the sheepfold. It can also be used to keep the sheep within the confines of safety. Ron Graham elaborates on this reference:

A ‘Sheepfold’ is a secure walled enclosure in which sheep are penned when not out to pasture in care of the shepherd. The sheepfold might be a permanent barn-like enclosure for shelter, an outdoor holding pen with stone walls, or a makeshift barricade of briars and crisscrossed pointed sticks. A single narrow opening was provided for entry and exit. If there was no secure door or gate, a keeper would guard the entrance or at night sleep across it. The purpose of the sheepfold was to keep the flock together, keep out wolves or dogs, and to make it difficult for thieves or vandals to steal or harm the sheep. A flock of sheep is a very valuable but vulnerable asset. A good shepherd knows and loves his sheep and guards them with his life against all predators. He keeps his flock together and fetches back any sheep that stray. A sheepfold was necessary for the protection of the flock.

Farmyard GateThe photo of a farmyard gate shows sheep grazing on the other side of the entrance. Similarly, Jesus describes himself as a door or gate to the sheep.

The Sheep Gate is also mentioned in the rebuilding of the wall and the gates at Jerusalem during the time of Nehemiah. A teaching series on the gates of Jerusalem was the inspiration for this poem which comes to mind while thinking of John 10:

At the Sheep Gate

I am the good shepherd; and I know My sheep,

and am known by My own

As the Father knows Me,

even so I know the Father;

and I lay down My life for the sheep.

John 10:14-15

Here stands a company of priests, a holy nation,

Those called, chosen and set apart faithfully to serve,

To restore the sacred place of adoration.

Our lives have become open books for all to observe.

Even as priests prepared the altar of sacrifice,

We commit our lives to serve the Lord and vow to keep

Our covenant both with God and with one another.

As the Good Shepherd lays down his life for the sheep,

We are willing to give our lives for a sister or brother.

We have been sent to the sheepfold to guard and protect

Indeed, we are willing to pay the ultimate price

To follow Christ that our love might be made perfect.

At the Sheep Gate God first speaks that His will might be known:

That shepherds with His heart should serve and preserve His own.

We close with this lively musical rendering of John 10:10: “I have come”