Posts Tagged ‘Jeremiah 33:2-3’

Open our eyes to re-look

September 14, 2018

Many times when looking for specific information located in a particular file on your device, you may “Providentially” come across something that ministers to you in a special yet unexpected way. Such was the case when I located a poem written years ago that I had not discussed nor posted. It opens with a statement from Chuck Pierce that I am calling the Quote of the Day for September 14, 2018:

“What the Lord is saying to us as we enter this season is: “’RE-LOOK!”

That statement became the inspiration for this response:

“Open your eyes. Look again, re-perceive.”

What the Lord is saying to us as we enter this season is: “RE-LOOK!”
Chuck Pierce

And it came to pass, as he sat at meat with them, he took bread, and blessed it, and brake, and gave to them.
And their eyes were opened, and they knew him; and he vanished out of their sight.
Luke 24:30-31

God says “Open your eyes. Look again, re-perceive.”
This time look at yourselves from a fresh vantage point.
He will refresh with loving kindness and anoint.
Look unto Him: Do not doubt but only believe.
We must reset our will to be in alignment
To see the truth and maintain the right attitude.
With a pure heart overflowing with gratitude,
We serve God and prepare for our new assignment.
Even in troubled times God has always been there.
As we commune with Him, blinded eyes receive new sight.
The Lord is our salvation. The Lord is our light.
With renewed strength we rest in hope and not despair.
As we complete our course, we look again and see
What was once a test is now our testimony.

In thinking about God’s desire for His people to “see” with fresh eyes and to be enlightened anew, I recall a previous blog entry discussing our request that God will open our eyes, as we echo the sentiments of the Psalmist in Psalm 119:18:

Open my eyes that I may see wonderful things in your law.

We find a corresponding command from the Lord who offers this exhortation in Jeremiah 33:2-3 (AMP):

“Thus says the Lord who made the earth, the Lord who formed it to establish it—the Lord is His name, ‘Call to Me and I will answer you, and tell you [and even show you] great and mighty things, [things which have been confined and hidden], which you do not know and understand and cannot distinguish.’

Most providentially, we find another expression of God’s desire that our eyes might perceive what God desires us to see in Ephesians 1:18 (KJV)

The eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints,

In actuality verse 18 is part of a prayer, an expression of God’s desire for His people written by the Apostle Paul in Ephesians 1: 14-23. Verses 17-18 are part of the introduction, as indicated in the Amplified Bible:

17 [For I always pray to] the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, that He may grant you a spirit of wisdom and revelation [of insight into mysteries and secrets] in the [deep and intimate] knowledge of Him,
18 By having the eyes of your heart flooded with light, so that you can know and understand the hope to which He has called you, and how rich is His glorious inheritance in the saints (His set-apart ones),

The passage from Ephesians 1, along with the previously cited verses, brings to mind the words of the hymn “Open My Eyes that I Might See” which is, in essence, a similar prayer expressed in song. The lyrics to the hymn are displayed while Nathanael Provis plays the melody on piano:

Not only is our prayer to God like that expressed in Psalm 119:18 and Jeremiah 33:3: that God will enlighten us and illuminate our lives, but we also recognize that God’s prayer for us is the same: that by means of the spirit of wisdom and revelation, that the eyes of our heart may be flooded with light, as is expressed so powerfully in Ephesians 1.

We close with a musical rendering of the prayer from Ephesians 1:18-23:

Open our eyes to re-look

September 14, 2018

Many times when looking for specific information located in a particular file on your device, you may “Providentially” come across something that ministers to you in a special yet unexpected way. Such was the case when I located a poem written years ago that I had not discussed nor posted. It opens with a statement from Chuck Pierce that I am calling the Quote of the Day for September 14, 2018:

“What the Lord is saying to us as we enter this season is: “’RE-LOOK!”

That statement became the inspiration for this response:

“Open your eyes. Look again, re-perceive.”

What the Lord is saying to us as we enter this season is: “RE-LOOK!”
Chuck Pierce

And it came to pass, as he sat at meat with them, he took bread, and blessed it, and brake, and gave to them.
And their eyes were opened, and they knew him; and he vanished out of their sight.
Luke 24:30-31

God says “Open your eyes. Look again, re-perceive.”
This time look at yourselves from a fresh vantage point.
He will refresh with loving kindness and anoint.
Look unto Him: Do not doubt but only believe.
We must reset our will to be in alignment
To see the truth and maintain the right attitude.
With a pure heart overflowing with gratitude,
We serve God and prepare for our new assignment.
Even in troubled times God has always been there.
As we commune with Him, blinded eyes receive new sight.
The Lord is our salvation. The Lord is our light.
With renewed strength we rest in hope and not despair.
As we complete our course, we look again and see
What was once a test is now our testimony.

In thinking about God’s desire for His people to “see” with fresh eyes and to be enlightened anew, I recall a previous blog entry discussing our request that God will open our eyes, as we echo the sentiments of the Psalmist in Psalm 119:18:

Open my eyes that I may see wonderful things in your law.

We find a corresponding command from the Lord who offers this exhortation in Jeremiah 33:2-3 (AMP):

“Thus says the Lord who made the earth, the Lord who formed it to establish it—the Lord is His name, ‘Call to Me and I will answer you, and tell you [and even show you] great and mighty things, [things which have been confined and hidden], which you do not know and understand and cannot distinguish.’

Most providentially, we find another expression of God’s desire that our eyes might perceive what God desires us to see in Ephesians 1:18 (KJV)

The eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints,

In actuality verse 18 is part of a prayer, an expression of God’s desire for His people written by the Apostle Paul in Ephesians 1: 14-23. Verses 17-18 are part of the introduction, as indicated in the Amplified Bible:

17 [For I always pray to] the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, that He may grant you a spirit of wisdom and revelation [of insight into mysteries and secrets] in the [deep and intimate] knowledge of Him,
18 By having the eyes of your heart flooded with light, so that you can know and understand the hope to which He has called you, and how rich is His glorious inheritance in the saints (His set-apart ones),

The passage from Ephesians 1, along with the previously cited verses, brings to mind the words of the hymn “Open My Eyes that I Might See” which is, in essence, a similar prayer expressed in song. The lyrics to the hymn are displayed while Nathanael Provis plays the melody on piano:

Not only is our prayer to God like that expressed in Psalm 119:18 and Jeremiah 33:3: that God will enlighten us and illuminate our lives, but we also recognize that God’s prayer for us is the same: that by means of the spirit of wisdom and revelation, that the eyes of our heart may be flooded with light, as is expressed so powerfully in Ephesians 1.

We close with a musical rendering of the prayer from Ephesians 1:18-23:

             

Call and God will respond

August 4, 2017

Jeremiah 33--3

The post for the Verse of the Day for August 4, 2017 is actually a compilation of comments taken from two previous entries based on Jeremiah 33:2-3 (AMP):

“Thus says the Lord who made the earth, the Lord who formed it to establish it—the Lord is His name, ‘Call to Me and I will answer you, and tell you [and even show you] great and mighty things, [things which have been confined and hidden], which you do not know and understand

This passage begins with a declaration of who God is and what He says He will do. Most remarkably, God can share great and unsearchable things because He is a great and mighty God. This magnificent portrait is repeated in Job 5:9 and 9:10 in the Holman Standard Bible:

He does great and unsearchable things, wonders without number.

Indeed, the Psalmist declares:

Psalm 145:3 (NKJV)

Great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised; and His greatness is unsearchable

Job 36:26 in the Amplified Bible makes it plain as to who God really is:

Behold, God is great, and we know Him not! The number of His years is unsearchable.

As believers, all we have to do is call to Him, but Isaiah 65:24 reveals that God knows our heart’s desires and responds to our requests, even before we articulate what we need:

I will answer them before they even call to me. While they are still talking about their needs, I will go ahead and answer their prayers!

I recall the lyrics to a gospel song that speaks of a problem that we can’t solve:

“While you’re trying to figure it out/God has already worked it out!”

To summarize the wonders of God’s matchless ways which seem so far above all that our finite minds can comprehend, take a look at Romans 11:33 in the Amplified Bible:

Romans 11:33

Oh, the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! How unfathomable (inscrutable, unsearchable) are His judgments (His decisions)! And how untraceable (mysterious, undiscoverable) are His ways (His methods, His paths)!

To tap in the depths of these riches, to access to the unsearchable, we simply have to call, knowing that God will answer.  In reflecting on the exhortation found in the passage from Jeremiah 33, the expression “Call and response” comes to mind.

In music, particularly in jazz which incorporates improvisation, we find this technique whereby a musician issues a phrase or line, and another player answers with a phrase or comment in response. The same technique is also seen other areas of African American culture involving speakers, such as preachers or ministers of the gospel or worship leaders who issue a series of calls and the audience, the congregation, or group being addressed answers with  responses. A frequent response is “Amen.”

Derived from the Hebrew word aman, “Amen” has been translated “it is so!” “so be it” or “thus shall it most surely be.” When repeated, the word is translated “verily, verily,” or “truly, truly” or simply “Amen” and “Amen.” Not only do Christians commonly respond to proclamations from the Bible with the widely used word, but Jews and Muslims likewise use this expression in a variety of languages across the world. According to Klyne Snodgrass, “Amen” is one of the most widely known words in all the world.”

The expression is used throughout the Bible in declaring the blessings of the Lord, as recorded in

Psalm 41:13

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, From everlasting to everlasting [from this age to the next, and forever]. “Amen” and “Amen” (so be it).

In the New Testament the expression follows the words of the Lord’s Prayer

Matthew 6:13 (AMP):

And do not lead us into temptation, but deliver us from evil. [For Yours is the kingdom and the power and the glory forever. “Amen”.]

The powerful apostolic prayer of Ephesians 3 ends with this bold declaration:

20 Now to Him who is able to [carry out His purpose and] do superabundantly more than all that we dare ask or think [infinitely beyond our greatest prayers, hopes, or dreams], according to His power that is at work within us, 21 to Him be the glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations forever and ever. “Amen”.

Jesus Christ is the means whereby the Father affirms and confirms every promise that He has made to His people. The Savior is the resounding “yes” when a question arises as to whether God will fulfill his promises. Paul makes known this profound truth in 2 Corinthians 1:19-20 (New Living Translation):

19 For Jesus Christ, the Son of God, does not waver between “Yes” and “No.” He is the one whom Silas, Timothy, and I preached to you, and as God’s ultimate “Yes,” he always does what he says.

20 For all of God’s promises have been fulfilled in Christ with a resounding “Yes!” And through Christ, our “Amen” (which means “Yes”) ascends to God for his glory…

Most amazingly, ““Amen”” is the last word in the Bible. When all is said and done, God has the last say so, and the last word means “It is so!” The Scriptures unfold in their entirety and crescendo with a grace note:

Revelation 22:21:

The grace of the Lord Jesus (the Christ, the Messiah) be with all [the saints—all believers, those set apart for God]. “Amen”.

To tap into the depths of the vastness of God beyond anything we can comprehend, to access the unsearchable, we simply have to call, knowing God will answer. Amen.

We conclude our discussion with this illustration of Jeremiah 33:3 as God’s Emergency Number:

Jim Hendricks offers this Worship Song based on Jeremiah 33:3:

 

 

 

 

 

Call upon the name of the Lord

August 24, 2016

psalm 116_1-2

From Psalm 116:1-2 in the Message Bible comes the Verse of the Day for August 24, 2016:

I love God because he listened to me, listened as I begged for mercy. He listened so intently as I laid out my case before him. Death stared me in the face, hell was hard on my heels. Up against it, I didn’t know which way to turn; then I called out to God for help: “Please, God!” I cried out. “Save my life!” God is gracious—it is he who makes things right, our most compassionate God. God takes the side of the helpless; when I was at the end of my rope, he saved me.

The verses are rendered this way in the King James Version:

Psalm 116:1-2:

I love the Lord, because he hath heard my voice and my supplications. Because he hath inclined his ear unto me, therefore will I call upon him as long as I live.

The Psalmist acknowledges his love for the Lord who heard him when called upon His name. Because the Lord “inclined his ear unto” the one who called upon Him, the caller will continue to call as long as he lives.

 

Verse 4 reiterates the same point:

Then called I upon the name of the Lord; O Lord, I beseech thee, deliver my soul.

 

Echoes of these verses can be heard in this excerpt from “Plainsong,” a poem that I wrote in tribute to my father:

 

Your plainsong I know by heart,

a hymn stanza learned with ease,

lined out like the flow of chanted words,

syllables fused into a single sound:

I-love-the-Lord-He-heard-my-cry”

raised and repeated over countless Sunday mornings.

The poem also makes reference to one of the vintage hymns composed by the great 18th Century hymn writer, Dr. Isaac Watts, who uses Psalm 116:1  as the inspiration for  “I love the Lord; He heard my cries” with this opening stanza:

I love the Lord; he heard my cries,
And pitied every groan:
Long as I live, when troubles rise,
I’ll hasten to his throne.

The hymns of Dr. Watts found their way into African American churches, being transformed into chants and acapella songs that formed the foundation of 20th Century gospel music. Listen to Gloria Henderson who leads a congregation in lining out this classic hymn by Dr. Watts.

In addition to Psalm 116:1, other verses also remind us to call upon the name of the Lord:

1 Chronicles 16:8

Give thanks unto the Lord, call upon his name, make known his deeds among the people.

 

Psalm 105:1

O give thanks unto the Lord; call upon his name: make known his deeds among the people.

 

Romans 10:13 so clearly makes known the results occurring to those who petition the Lord:

 

For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.

 

Throughout the Scriptures we see that believers are encouraged to call upon the name of the Lord. Note this invitation extended in Jeremiah 33:2-3 (NIV):

“This is what the Lord says, he who made the earth, the Lord who formed it and established it—the Lord is his name:

‘Call to me and I will answer you and tell you great and unsearchable things you do not know.’

 

One of the most often quotes passages from Jeremiah relates a promise given by God to Israel in Jeremiah 29:11-13, a passage that applies to Christians today as well:

11 For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.

12 Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you.

13 You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.

 

Psalm 107 reveals the seemingly never-ending cycle whereby the people of God stray from the pathways of God and find themselves in difficult straights, and as verses, 6, 13, 19, and 28 make known:

 

Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble, and he delivered them out of their distresses.

 

Despite the truth that God consistently delivers those who cry out to him, His people too often fall back into trouble whereby they once again call upon the Lord in the midst of their struggles.  Throughout the Psalms and elsewhere in the Scriptures we see that our faithful God responds to those who call upon Him.

 

Jim and Ginger Hendricks provide a moving musical exhortation: “Call unto Me”

 

Jeremiah 33:2-3: Call and response

August 4, 2016

Jeremiah 33--3

The Verse of Day for August 4, 2016 begins with a declaration of who God is and what He says in Jeremiah 33:2-3 (AMP):

“Thus says the Lord who made the earth, the Lord who formed it to establish it—the Lord is His name, ‘Call to Me and I will answer you, and tell you [and even show you] great and mighty things, [things which have been confined and hidden], which you do not know and understand and cannot distinguish.’

Most remarkably, God can share great and unsearchable things because He is a great and mighty God. This magnificent portrait is repeated in Job 5:9 and 9:10 in the Holman Standard Bible:

He does great and unsearchable things, wonders without number.

Indeed, the Psalmist declares:

Psalm 145:3 (NKJV)

Great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised; and His greatness is unsearchable

Job 36:26 in the Amplified Bible makes it plain as to who God really is:

Behold, God is great, and we know Him not! The number of His years is unsearchable.

As believers, all we have to do is call to Him, but Isaiah 65:24 reveals that God knows our heart’s desires and responds to our requests, even before we articulate what we need:

I will answer them before they even call to me. While they arJobe e still talking about their needs, I will go ahead and answer their prayers!

I recall the lyrics to a gospel song that speaks of a problem that we can’t solve:

“While you’re trying to figure it out/God has already worked it out!”

To summarize the wonders of God’s matchless ways which seem so far above all that our finite minds can comprehend, take a look at Romans 11:33 in the Amplified Bible:

Romans 11:33

Oh, the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! How unfathomable (inscrutable, unsearchable) are His judgments (His decisions)! And how untraceable (mysterious, undiscoverable) are His ways (His methods, His paths)!

To tap in the depths of these riches, to access to the unsearchable, we simply have to ask, knowing that God will answer.

In reflecting on the Verse of the Day, I thought of the expression “Call and response.” In music, particularly in jazz which incorporates improvisation, we find a technique labeled “call and response,” whereby a musician issues a phrase or line, and another player answers with a phrase or comment in response. The same technique is also seen in other areas of African American culture involving speakers, such as preachers or ministers of the gospel or worship leaders who issue a series of calls, and the audience, the congregation, or group being addressed answers with responses.

In the case of the Verse of the Day, believers are instructed to issue a call to God and in return He responds with an answer whereby He demonstrates or displays His mighty power. Our response to His response is to confirm what God declares with a hearty “Amen!”

Listen to this innovative teaching from Marler Media of Jeremiah 33:3 as God’s Emergency Number:

The Seeds Family offer this Worship Song based on Jeremiah 33:3:

Great and unsearchable things you do not know

August 4, 2015

Jeremiah 33--3The Verse of Day for August 4, 2015 begins with a declaration of who God is and what He says in Jeremiah 33:2-3 (NLT):

“This is what the Lord says, he who made the earth, the Lord who formed it and established it—the Lord is his name:

‘Call to me and I will answer you and tell you great and unsearchable things you do not know.’

Most remarkably, God can share great and unsearchable things because He is a great and mighty God. This magnificent portrait is repeated in Job 5:9 and 9:10 in the Holman Standard Bible:

He does great and unsearchable things, wonders without number.

Indeed, the Psalmist declares:

Psalm 145:3 (NKJV)

Great is the Lord, and greatly to be praised; and His greatness is unsearchable

Job 36:26 in the Amplified Bible makes it plain as to who God really is:

Behold, God is great, and we know Him not! The number of His years is unsearchable.

This magnificent portrayal of our great and mighty God is captured in music with the song “You Are Amazing”:

As believers, all we have to do is call to Him, but Isaiah 65:24 reveals that God knows our heart’s desires and responds to our requests, even before we articulate what we need:

I will answer them before they even call to me. While they are still talking about their needs, I will go ahead and answer their prayers!

I recall the lyrics to a gospel song that speaks of a problem that we can’t solve:

“While you’re trying to figure it out/God has already worked it out!”

To summarize the wonders of God’s matchless ways which seem so far above all that our finite minds can comprehend, take a look at Romans 11:33 in the Amplified Bible:

Romans 11:33

Oh, the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God! How unfathomable (inscrutable, unsearchable) are His judgments (His decisions)! And how untraceable (mysterious, undiscoverable) are His ways (His methods, His paths)!

To tap in the depths of these riches, to access to the unsearchable, we simply have to ask, knowing that God will answer.

Listen to this innovative teaching from Marler Media of Jeremiah 33:3 as God’s Emergency Number:

The Seeds Family offer this Worship Song based on Jeremiah 33:3:

Call upon the name of the Lord

August 24, 2014

psalm 116_1-2The Verse of the Day for August 24 is found in Psalm 116:1-2 (KJV):

I love the Lord, because he hath heard my voice and my supplications. Because he hath inclined his ear unto me, therefore will I call upon him as long as I live.

The Psalmist acknowledges his love for the Lord who heard him when called upon His name. Because the Lord “inclined his ear unto” the one who called upon Him, the caller will continue to call as long as he lives. Verse 4 reiterates the same point:

Then called I upon the name of the Lord; O Lord, I beseech thee, deliver my soul.

Echoes of these verses can be heard in this excerpt from “Plainsong,” a poem that I wrote in tribute to my father:

Your plainsong I know by heart,                         

a hymn stanza learned with ease,                       

lined out like the flow of chanted words,

syllables fused into a single sound:

I-love-the-Lord-He-heard-my-cry”

raised and repeated over countless Sunday mornings.

The poem makes reference to one of the vintage hymns composed by the great 18th Century hymn writer, Dr. Isaac Watts, who uses Psalm 116:1 as the inspiration for “I love the Lord; He heard my cries” with this opening stanza:

I love the Lord; he heard my cries,
And pity’d every groan:
Long as I live, when troubles rise,
I’ll hasten to his throne.

The hymns of Dr. Watts found their way into African American churches, being transformed into chants and acapella songs that formed the foundation of 20th Century gospel music. Listen to Debra Henderson who leads a congregation in lining out this classic hymn by Dr. Watts.

In addition to Psalm 116:1-2, other verses also remind us to call upon the name of the Lord:

1 Chronicles 16:8

Give thanks unto the Lord, call upon his name, make known his deeds among the people.

Psalm 105:1

O give thanks unto the Lord; call upon his name: make known his deeds among the people.

Romans 10:13 so clearly makes known the results occurring to those who petition the Lord:

For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.

Throughout the Scriptures we see that believers are encouraged to call upon the name of the Lord. Note this invitation extended in Jeremiah 33:2-3 (NIV):

“This is what the Lord says, he who made the earth, the Lord who formed it and established it—the Lord is his name:

‘Call to me and I will answer you and tell you great and unsearchable things you do not know.’

One of the most often quotes passages from Jeremiah relates a promise given by God to Israel in Jeremiah 29:11-13, a passage that applies to Christians today as well:

11 For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.

12 Then you will call on me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you.

13 You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart.

Psalm 107 reveals the seemingly never-ending cycle whereby the people of God stray from the pathways of God and find themselves in difficult straights, and as verses, 6, 13, 19, and 28 make known:

Then they cried unto the Lord in their trouble, and he delivered them out of their distresses.

Despite the truth that God consistently delivers those who cry out to him, His people too often fall back into trouble whereby they once again call upon the Lord in the midst of their struggles. Throughout the Psalms and elsewhere in the Scriptures we see that our faithful God responds to those who call upon Him

Jim and Ginger Hendricks provide a moving musical exhortation: “Call unto Me”