Posts Tagged ‘Independence Day’

July 4, 2021: Learning to live in a state of dependence

July 4, 2021

On July 4, 2021, the Verse of the Day examines Psalm 33:12, but to understand more fully the position of the Lord God Almighty toward the nations of the world, take a look at Psalm 33:10-12 in the Amplified Bible:

The LORD nullifies the counsel of the nations;
He makes the thoughts and plans of the people ineffective.
11
The counsel of the LORD stands forever,
The thoughts and plans of His heart through all generations.
12
Blessed [fortunate, prosperous, and favored by God] is the nation whose God is the LORD,
The people whom He has chosen as His own inheritance.

On this Fourth of July, when so much that plagues our nation appears beyond our control, we not only celebrate our independence as a nation, but we also recognize more than ever our dependence upon God as well. This original psalm reinforces that same message:

Learning to Live in a State of Dependence

And whatever you do [no matter what it is] in word or deed,

do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus and in [dependence upon]

His Person, giving praise to God the Father through Him.

Colossians 3:17 (Amplified Bible)

God’s promises never fail; we know the Word of God is true.                          

We learn to watch, fight, and pray, to be patient as we labor                               

We have no fear but faith for what God says about me and you.        

We taste the fullness of joy that He desires us to savor,            

As He lavishly displays His love with abundant favor.             

God, the righteous judge, avenges those who place their trust in Him          

And assures those who lean on Him He shall in nowise condemn.    

As we seek to keep His command to love God and our neighbor,      

The Word of God goes ahead as a plow to prepare fallow ground,                 

Fertile soil found in hearts that have been made pure with no pretense,

Where the Father’s precious seeds of faith will flourish and abound.

With God, we are learning to live in a state of dependence,

Where we are free to choose to serve, knowing we shall prevail.

Transient trials swiftly pass, but God’s promises never fail.                

During these presently turbulent times, never has there been a greater need for divine guidance and direction for the nation though prayer. The words of the spiritual continue to ring true, declaring, “There is trouble all over this world.” During such times of desperation and deepest need, our nation cries out to God.

O God our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come.
Our shelter from the stormy blast
And our eternal home.

In “History Reflection for 4th of July: How Prayer Underpinned American Independence” Fr. Stephen Lynch, states, “Prayer played an important role in the American struggle for independence.” He goes on to relate a request that the meetings of the Continental Congress be opened with prayer. After considerable disagreement, the Congress agreed to have the Rev. Mr. Duche read a prayer. John Adams describes what transpired:

Accordingly, next morning the Rev. Duche appeared with his Episcopal vestments and read the 85th Psalm. I never saw a greater effect produced upon an audience. It seemed as if heaven had ordained that psalm to be read on that morning.

George Washington was kneeling there, alongside him Patrick Henry, James Madison, and John Hancock. By their side there stood, bowed in reverence, the Puritan patriots of New England, who at that moment had reason to believe that an armed soldiery was wasting their humble households. They prayed fervently for America, for Congress, for the Province of Massachusetts Bay, and especially for the town of Boston [whose port had been closed and in which British troops were being quartered.

Lynch concludes by saying, “The First Continental Congress proved to be an inspiring example of the fraternal unity that can come through devout prayer.” Without question, the need to pray for our nation continues, being mindful of the words of Jesus Christ, who told his disciples “. . . it was necessary for them to pray consistently and never quit.”

Our reflections on the 4th of July conclude, as Michael Card offers this song as a heartfelt prayer for the nation: “Heal our Land”:

July 4, 2017: Celebrating America’s independence and our dependence on God

July 4, 2017

On July 4, 2017, the Verse of the Day makes known the position of the Lord God Almighty toward the nations of the world:

Psalm 33:10-12 (Message Bible):

God takes the wind out of Babel pretense, he shoots down the world’s power-schemes. God’s plan for the world stands up, all his designs are made to last. Blessed is the country with God for God; blessed are the people he’s put in his will.

The Amplified Bible offers this rendering:

The LORD nullifies the counsel of the nations;
He makes the thoughts and plans of the people ineffective.
11
The counsel of the LORD stands forever,
The thoughts and plans of His heart through all generations.
12
Blessed [fortunate, prosperous, and favored by God] is the nation whose God is the LORD,
The people whom He has chosen as His own inheritance.

On this Fourth of July, when so much that plagues our nation appears beyond our control, we not only celebrate our independence as a nation, but we also recognize more than ever our dependence upon God as well. During these presently turbulent times, never has there been a greater need for divine guidance and direction for the nation though prayer. The words of the spiritual continue to ring true, declaring, “There is trouble all over this world.” During such times of desperation and deepest need, our nation cries out to God.

O God our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come.
Our shelter from the stormy blast
And our eternal home.

In “History Reflection for 4th of July: How Prayer Underpinned American Independence” Fr. Stephen Lynch, states, “Prayer played an important role in the American struggle for independence.” He goes on to relate a request that the meetings of the Continental Congress be opened with prayer. After considerable disagreement, the Congress agreed to have the Rev. Mr. Duche read a prayer. John Adams describes what transpired:

Accordingly, next morning the Rev. Duche appeared with his Episcopal vestments and read the 85th Psalm. I never saw a greater effect produced upon an audience. It seemed as if heaven had ordained that psalm to be read on that morning.

George Washington was kneeling there, alongside him Patrick Henry, James Madison, and John Hancock. By their side there stood, bowed in reverence, the Puritan patriots of New England, who at that moment had reason to believe that an armed soldiery was wasting their humble households. They prayed fervently for America, for Congress, for the Province of Massachusetts Bay, and especially for the town of Boston [whose port had been closed and in which British troops were being quartered.

Lynch concludes by saying, “The First Continental Congress proved to be an inspiring example of the fraternal unity that can come through devout prayer.” Without question, the need to pray for our nation continues, being mindful of the words of Jesus Christ, who told his disciples “. . . it was necessary for them to pray consistently and never quit.”

Our reflections on the 4th of July conclude, as Michael Card offers this song as a heartfelt prayer for the nation: “Heal our Land”:

July 4th: Celebrating the nation’s independence and our dependence on God

July 2, 2014

Psalm 33--12

It is by far one of the most popular summer celebrations in the nation: the 4th of July or Independence Day recognizes America’s official severing of ties with Great Britain, when the Second Continental Congress drafted the Declaration of Independence. According to a discussion of the history of the Fourth by PBS, http://www.pbs.org/capitolfourth/history.html, the committee responsible for writing the document included Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston. Although the document was principally crafted by Jefferson, who was considered the strongest and most eloquent writer, a total of 86 changes were made to his draft. The final version was officially adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776.

On July 8, 1776, the first public readings of the Declaration were held in Philadelphia’s Independence Square to the ringing of bells and band music. One year later, on July 4, 1777, Philadelphia marked Independence Day by adjourning Congress and celebrating with bonfires, bells and fireworks.

The custom eventually spread to other towns, both large and small, where the day was marked with processions, oratory, picnics, contests, games, military displays and fireworks. Observations throughout the nation became even more common at the end of the War of 1812 with Great Britain.

Congress established Independence Day as a holiday in 1870 and in 1938 Congress reaffirmed it as a holiday, but with full pay for federal employees. Today, communities across the nation mark this major midsummer holiday with parades, fireworks, picnics and the playing of the “Star Spangled Banner” and marches by John Philip Sousa.

Today, 238 years since the signing of the Declaration of Independence, in the midst of these turbulent times, never has there been a greater need for divine guidance and direction for the nation though prayer. The words of the spiritual have never been truer than when they declared, “There is trouble all over this world.” During times of desperation and deepest need, the nation cries out to God. The Psalmist reminds us

Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord.

Righteousness exalts a nation but sin is a reproach to any man.

In “History Reflection for 4th of July: How Prayer Underpinned American Independence” Fr. Stephen Lynch, states, “Prayer played an important role in the American struggle for independence.” He goes on to relate a request that the meetings of the Continental Congress be opened with prayer. After considerable disagreement, the Congress agreed to have the Rev. Mr. Duche read a prayer. John Adams describes what transpired:

“Accordingly, next morning the Rev. Duche appeared with his Episcopal vestments and read the 85th Psalm. I never saw a greater effect produced upon an audience. It seemed as if heaven had ordained that psalm to be read on that morning.

“George Washington was kneeling there, alongside him Patrick Henry, James Madison, and John Hancock.  By their side there stood, bowed in reverence, the Puritan patriots of New England, who at that moment had reason to believe that an armed soldiery was wasting their humble households. They prayed fervently for America, for Congress, for the Province of Massachusetts Bay, and especially for the town of Boston [whose port had been closed and in which British troops were being quartered.”

Lynch concludes by saying, “The First Continental Congress proved to be an inspiring example of the fraternal unity that can come through devout prayer.”

In reflecting on the importance of prayer in our nation’s beginning, we are reminded of the words of Jesus Christ who declared, “Men ought always to pray and not to faint.” As never before, we need to continue to pray for our nation.

On this Fourth of July, when much that plagues our nation appears beyond our control, we not only celebrate our independence as a nation, but we also recognize that more than ever we must also recognize our dependence upon God as well.

O God our help in ages past,

Our hope for years to come.

Our shelter from the stormy blast

And our eternal home.

Take-6 offers this stirring rendition of “If we ever needed the Lord before, we sure do need Him now,” as we declare our dependence upon God on Independence Day.