Posts Tagged ‘Galatians 4:4-5’

When the fullness of time was come

December 12, 2017

Galatians 4--4-5

Revised and re-posted, the Verse of the Day for December 12, 2017 offers another passage related to the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ taken from Galatians 4:4-5 in the King James Version:

But when the fullness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

The Amplified Bible says this:

But when [in God’s plan] the proper time had fully come, God sent His Son, born of a woman, born under the [regulations of the] Law, so that He might redeem and liberate those who were under the Law, that we [who believe] might be adopted as sons [as God’s children with all rights as fully grown members of a family]. But when the fullness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

The expression “the fullness of the time” refers to “the time appointed by the Father” spoken of in Galatians 4:2. The phrase is also translated “that when the time is ripe” or “at the right time.” According to Logos Bible software, “God does nothing prematurely, but, foreseeing the end from the beginning, waits till all is ripe for the execution of His purpose.”

The same phrase is used in Ephesians 1:10 which refers to the return of Jesus Christ

10 That in the dispensation of the fullness of times he might gather together in one all things in Christ, both which are in heaven, and which are on earth; even in him:

Although as believers we recognize and celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, we also remember His birth is only the first part of the five-fold purpose of his life: his birth, his death, resurrection, ascension, and his return.

We, first of all, realize that Jesus Christ was born to die, for we cannot deny that he was also crucified, that he died, and that he was buried, but we also proclaim that “He is risen, indeed.”  In addition, Christ ascended to the Father, as we also proclaim: “For the Lord himself will descend from heaven with a cry of command. …And the dead in Christ will rise first. Then we who are alive…will be caught up together with them…and so we will always be with the Lord.” All of this comes to mind with the birth of Jesus Christ.

Among the most popular songs of the Christmas season is “Amen,” composed by Jester Hairston, one of the most celebrated arrangers of spirituals of the 20th Century. The lyrics not only tell of the birth of Jesus Christ, but they also give an overview of his entire life in a most memorable way:

Amen, amen
Amen, amen, amen
Sing it over one time children
Listen to my story
It’s a story about my Jesus
Amen

See the little baby
You know He’s wrapped in a manger
Born Christmas morning
Amen

See Him at the seashore
Talking to the fishermen
And He’s making them disciples
Amen, amen

Riding through Jerusalem
Waving palm branches
In pomp and splendor

See Him in the garden
Praying to His Father
In deepest sorrow, sorrow

Led before Pilate
Then they crucified Him
But He rose on Easter
Amen, amen, amen

Hallelujah!
Yes, He died to save you and me
And He lives forever and ever
Amen

Glory hallelujah!
He died to save you and me
And He lives forever
Amen, amen, amen

“Amen” is a signature piece for the contemporary gospel singer, Larnelle Harris, who always provides a powerful and unforgettable performance along with the Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir:

Christ’s birth: a kind of first fruits

December 12, 2016

 

galatians-4-4-7

Revised and re-posted, the Verse of the Day for December 12, 2016 offers another passage related to the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ taken from Galatians 4:4-5 in the Amplified Bible:

But when [in God’s plan] the proper time had fully come, God sent His Son, born of a woman, born under the [regulations of the] Law, so that He might redeem and liberate those who were under the Law, that we [who believe] might be adopted as sons [as God’s children with all rights as fully grown members of a family]. But when the fullness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, to redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

Apropos of the Christmas season, the passage also brings to mind the birth of Jesus Christ through whom we have the adoption as sons.  Adoption is a legal process whereby adopted sons had the same rights and privileges as sons who were naturally born into a family. Indeed, as legally adopted sons, believers have the right to our father’s inheritance and all that citizenship in His heavenly kingdom entails.

A similar expression is used in Romans 8:23-24 (NASB):

22 For we know that the whole creation groans and suffers the pains of childbirth together until now. 23 And not only this, but also we ourselves, having the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting eagerly for our adoption as sons, the redemption of our body.

The reference to Jesus Christ as a glorious illustration of first fruits was the inspiration behind this poem with that title:

First fruits

In the exercise of His will He brought us forth

by the word of truth, so that we would be a kind

of first fruits among His creatures.

James 1:18 (NASB)

 

Ever transform, as You so fashion our visage

To be like Christ, the brightness of your glory.

In Your refiner’s fire melt us that we might be

Molded, our being cast in His express image:

As brand new boldface type printed upon the page,

As a double eagle minted in your treasure,

Stamped with the very essence of your character

To convey the awesome power of your message.

So saturate our lives: spirit, heart, soul, and mind,

Every fiber of my being, down to our pores;

Permeate us with Your presence that we might find

Our true calling as Christ’s faithful ambassadors.

More than mere vessel, vehicle, or instrument,

Like Christ, we are formed as first fruits of God’s intent.

Although as believers we recognize and celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, we also remember His birth is only the first part of his five-fold purpose: he was born; he lived and he died; he was raised from the dead; he ascended to his Father; and he shall return.

We, first of all, realize that Jesus Christ was born to die, for we cannot deny that he was also crucified, that he died, and that he was buried, but we also proclaim that “He is risen, indeed.”  In addition, just as Christ ascended to the Father, we also proclaim: “For the Lord himself will descend from heaven with a cry of command. …And the dead in Christ will rise first. Then we who are alive…will be caught up together with them…and so we will always be with the Lord.” All of this comes to mind with the birth of Jesus Christ.

One of the popular songs of the Christmas season is the 20th Century spiritual “Amen” with lyrics that tell not only of the birth of Jesus Christ but give an overview of his entire life in a most memorable way. Here is Larnell Harris offering his moving rendition:

Eagerly waiting for the adoption

December 12, 2015

galatians-445

The Verse of the Day for December 12, 2015 is taken from Galatians 4:4-5 (AMP):

But when [in God’s plan] the proper time had fully come, God sent His Son, born of a woman, born under the [regulations of the] Law, so that He might redeem and liberate those who were under the Law, that we [who believe] might be adopted as sons [as God’s children with all rights as fully grown members of a family].

Apropos of the Christmas season the passage brings to mind the birth of Jesus Christ through whom we have the adoption as sons. Adoption is a legal process whereby adopted sons are given the same rights and privileges as sons who were naturally born into a family. Indeed, as legally adopted sons we have the right to our father’s inheritance and all that his citizenship entails.

A similar expression is used in Romans 8:22-23:

22 For we know that the whole creation has been moaning together as in the pains of childbirth until now. 23 And not only this, but we too, who have the first fruits of the Spirit [a joyful indication of the blessings to come], even we groan inwardly, as we wait eagerly for [the sign of] our adoption as sons—the redemption and transformation of our body [at the resurrection].

This related passage is part of the introduction for an original poem that personalizes a deep yearning to not only witness but to actually participate in the birthing process in a manner similar to my being present for the birth of our two daughters. One of the metaphors that I occasionally use to describe this deep desire is that I often speak of being an “accoucheur,” the French term that describes a male attendant at a birthing, the masculine counterpart of a midwife. That particular phrase is used in the title of a poem that came to mind, as I reflected upon the two passages related to giving birth.

Accoucheurs to Spring

For we know that the whole creation groans and labors with birth pangs together until now.

Not only that, but we also who have the firstfruits of the Spirit,
even we ourselves groan within ourselves,
eagerly waiting for the adoption, the redemption of our body.

Romans 8:22-23

For years we have yearned to be accoucheurs to spring,
To observe, to assist with the birthing process,
The fruitful flowering as part of God’s offspring
That reveals the Father’s deep desire to bless.
As a mother whose hour has come will travail,
Wailing, waiting for the fruit of love to be seen,
So barrenness trembles that new life might prevail
To transform the gray terrain to emerald green.
We follow the gardener whose plans we cannot see;
To seek God’s will and do it are our sole pursuits.
As we move into the fullness of His glory,
The Lord of the harvest gathers precious firstfruits.
The whole creation groans, all heaven and earth
Yearn to experience the wonder of childbirth.

During this season we are continually reminded of the birth of the Savior who came forth in the fullness of time that we might have the adoption as sons.

So many of the songs of Christmas refer to the birth of the Jesus Christ, and one of my favorite is the spiritual “Children, Go Where I Send Thee.” Listen to this rousing rendition by contemporary Christian artist, Mandisa. The lyrics begin and end with a reference to “the little biddy baby who was born, born, born in Bethlehem.”

 

Verse of the Day: Adoption of sons

December 12, 2013

galatians-445

The Verse of the Day for December 12, 2013 is taken from Galatians 4:4-5 :

But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law, To redeem them that were under the law, that we might receive the adoption of sons.

Apropos of the Christmas season the passage brings to mind the birth of Jesus Christ through whom we have the adoption as sons.  Adoption is a legal process whereby adopted sons had the same rights and privileges as sons who were naturally born into a family. Indeed, as legally adopted sons we have the right to our father’s inheritance and that his citizenship entails.

The same expression is used in Romans 8:23-24:

And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body.

This related passage is part of the introduction for an original poem written for a student in one the writing classes that I recently taught. It was an unusual class in that all seven of the students were nurses working on their bachelor’s degree. This particular student was a nurse in labor and delivery, an area where she loved to serve and where she hoped to someday become a nurse practitioner.

The French have a word that describes a female attendant at a birthing, une accoucheuse, a phrase that is used in the title of the poem came to mind as I reflected upon the two passages related to giving birth.

Une accoucheuse* with hands to bless

For we know that the whole creation groans and labors

with birth pangs together until now.

 Not only that, but we also who have the firstfruits of the  Spirit,

even we ourselves groan within ourselves, eagerly waiting

 for the adoption, the redemption of our body.

Romans 8:23-24

Your delight is to assist in bringing forth new life,

To observe, to help monitor the birthing process,

As a nurse practitioner, a kind of midwife,

As the French would say, “une accoucheuse,” with hands to bless

And bear witness of the golden aura of God’s glory:

Unbearable pain transformed into unspeakable joy.

The wonder of creation astounds in all you see,

Beholding the crowning entrance of each girl and boy.

You find extreme pleasure in all the work that you do.

Your life’s work is your great reward beyond any wage.

After countless times, each labor and delivery is new,

As tears of joy overflow throughout the final stage.

The whole of God’s creation, all of heaven and earth,

Also wait to experience the miracle of childbirth.

So many of the songs of Christmas refer to the birth of the Jesus Christ, and one of my favorite is the spiritual “Children, Go Where I Send Thee.” Listen to this rousing rendition by contemporary Christian artist, Mandisa. The lyrics begin and end with a reference to “the little biddy baby who was born, born, born in Bethlehem.”

During this season we are continually reminded of the birth of the Savior who came forth in the fullness of time that we might have the adoption as sons.