Posts Tagged ‘do good’

For the good of your neighbor

May 23, 2016

Romans 15--2

The Verse of the Day for May 23, 2016 encourages believers to be concerned about the welfare of others:

Romans 15:2 (AMP):

Let each one of us make it a practice to please (make happy) his neighbor for his good and for his true welfare, to edify him [to strengthen him and build him up spiritually].

The Verse of the Day brings to mind a similar expression regarding how one should behave toward one’s neighbor and that is “to do good” to those who whom we encounter.  Throughout the Scriptures we find references that encourage believers as to how they should behave. Here are two illustrations from the Psalms of David:

Psalm 34:14 (AMP)

Turn away from evil and do good; Seek peace and pursue it.

Psalm 37:3

Trust [rely on and have confidence] in the Lord and do good; Dwell in the land and feed [securely] on His faithfulness.

Proverbs 14:22 (NLT) makes clear that those who choose to “do evil” or “to do good” will be rewarded accordingly:

If you plan to do evil, you will be lost; if you plan to do good, you will receive unfailing love and faithfulness

In the Gospels the Lord Jesus Christ encouraged his followers to “do good,” even to one’s enemies:

Luke 6:27 (AMP):

But I say to you who hear [Me and pay attention to My words]: Love [that is, unselfishly seek the best or higher good for] your enemies, [make it a practice to] do good to those who hate you,

Luke 6:35 (AMP):

But love [that is, unselfishly seek the best or higher good for] your enemies, and do good, and lend, expecting nothing in return; for your reward will be great (rich, abundant), and you will be sons of the Most High; because He Himself is kind and gracious and good to the ungrateful and the wicked.

Galatians 6:10 (AMP) offer this sound advice:

So then, while we [as individual believers] have the opportunity, let us do good to all people [not only being helpful, but also doing that which promotes their spiritual well-being], and especially [be a blessing] to those of the household of faith (born-again believers).

1 Thessalonians 5:15 reinforces this message:

See that no one pays back evil for evil, but always try to do good to each other and to all people.

The exhortation “to do good” also brings to mind the sage advice of John Wesley:

“Do all the good you can. By all the means you can. In all the ways you can. In all the places you can. At all the times you can. To all the people you can. As long as ever you can.”

The musical group Commissioned closes our comments with this reminder that in all that we do “Only What You Do for Christ Will Last.”

What we are supposed to do

May 23, 2015

Romans_15-2Romans 15:2 (New Living Testament, the Verse of the Day for May 23, 2015, makes known what are we supposed to do as Christian believers:

We should help others do what is right and build them up in the Lord.

We find a similar exhortation in 1 Corinthians 10:33 (NLT):

I, too, try to please everyone in everything I do. I don’t just do what is best for me; I do what is best for others so that many may be saved.

Theses verses also bring to mind Micah 6:8 which asks a probing question in the King James Version:

He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?

The New Living Translation renders the verse as this powerful statement:

No, O people, the Lord has told you what is good,
and this is what he requires of you:
to do what is right, to love mercy,
and to walk humbly with your God.

The following excerpt comes from a blog entry devoted to Micah 6:8 which provides a discussion of three simple requirements, three prerequisites for Godly living expressed in three verbs written as infinitives: to do, to love, and to walk.

Here are references as to what we are “to do”:

To do . . .

This verb brings to mind a similar exhortation from Galatians 6:10:

As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith.

We have a choice to do good or to do evil, but the Word of God reminds us that despite the sinful nature of humanity, our ultimate purpose is to do good:

Ecclesiastes 3:12:

I know that there is no good in them, but for a man to rejoice, and to do good in his life.

This reminder to do justly or to “do good” is echoed in the words of John Wesley, who said:

“Do all the good you can. By all the means you can. In all the ways you can. In all the places you can. At all the times you can. To all the people you can. As long as ever you can.”

Ecclesiastes 9:10 (NLT) offers this sobering reminder:

Whatever you do, do well. For when you go to the grave, there will be no work or planning or knowledge or wisdom.

Colossians 3:23 also provides the standard by which we should measure whatever we do:

Work willingly at whatever you do, as though you were working for the Lord rather than for people.

A scripture memory song of Colossians 3:23-24 in the King James Version puts it this way:

And whatsoever you do, do it heartily as to the Lord,

Knowing that of the Lord, you shall receive your reward.

Whatever your hands find to do, do it with all your might.

Knowing that of the Lord, you shall receive your reward.

For you serve the Lord Jesus Christ.

For you serve the Lord Jesus Christ.

The overall expectations that God has for His people seem simple enough: Like the Nike slogan states, we should: “Just do it!” In actuality, “There’s nothing to it but to do it!” We close with this poetic reminder not to procrastinate but to

Do It Now!

Redeeming the time, because the days are evil.

Therefore be ye not unwise, but understanding

what the will of the Lord is.

Ephesians 5:15-16

If you want to live each minute

With the fullest measure in it,

To run your best race and win it

Then start to do it now!

Don’t wait until it’s tomorrow

To look for the time to borrow,

For you may be filled with sorrow

Unless you do it now!

Don’t wait until the time is right.

By then you may have long lost sight

Of work to do with all your might.

Be sure to do it now!

Make up your mind; don’t hesitate.

Now is the time to act, don’t wait.

You’ve got nothing to lose; go straight

Ahead and do it now!

Just put the past behind somehow

And with each moment make a vow:

Now is the time to do it now.

Get up and do it now!

Listen to a musical rendering of Micah 6:8 offered by Maranatha! Singers:

To do justly, love mercy, walk humbly

January 4, 2015

Micah-6--8

The Verse of the Day for January 4, 2015 is taken from Micah 6:8:

He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the Lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?

The verse states three simple requirements, three prerequisites for Godly living expressed in three verbs written as infinitives: to do, to love, and to walk.

To do . . .

This verb brings to mind a similar exhortation from Galatians 6:10:

As we have therefore opportunity, let us do good unto all men, especially unto them who are of the household of faith.

We have a choice to do good or to do evil, but the Word of God reminds us that despite the sinful nature of humanity, our ultimate purpose is to do good:

Ecclesiastes 3:12:

12 I know that there is no good in them, but for a man to rejoice, and to do good in his life.

This reminder to do justly or to do good is echoed in the words of John Wesley, who said:

“Do all the good you can. By all the means you can. In all the ways you can. In all the places you can. At all the times you can. To all the people you can. As long as ever you can.”

To love . . .

One of the most powerful verbs in any language is the command to love. In this case, we are to love mercy.

That God is truly merciful cannot be ignored.

Streams of the sure mercies of the Lord shall never cease.

Our lives are enriched as we learn to walk with the Lord.

Jeremiah reminds us that, “It is of the Lord’s mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not. They are new every morning. Great is thy faithfulness.”

One of the attributes of God is that He is a God of mercy. In a real sense, as a God of justice, He tempers justice with grace and mercy. Justice has been defined as “getting exactly what one deserves.” Whereas grace is said to be unmerited favor or getting something that one does not deserve, and mercy is defined as “withholding merited judgment” or “not getting what one deserves. God desires that we love mercy. As Portia, a character in Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice, remarks so wisely,

Though justice be thy plea, consider this:
That, in the course of justice, none of us
Should see salvation. We do pray for mercy,
And that same prayer doth teach us all to render
The deeds of mercy.

To walk . . .

The final requirement is to “walk humbly with thy God.” The First Psalm describes the man who does not walk in the counsel of the ungodly, as being blessed (happy, fortunate, prosperous, and enviable). God’s desire is that we walk in humility, even as humility was a most notable attribute of the Lord Jesus Christ, described in this manner: 

Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God:

But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men:

And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. (Philippians 2:6-8)

1 Peter 2:21 also encourages us:

For even hereunto were you called: because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that you should follow his steps:

As we walk with the Lord, we find that humility is the key to access the heart of God.

The expectations that God has for His people seem simple enough: “to do . . . to love . . . to walk.” Certainly they must be attainable or God would not expect people to do what He asks. The challenge becomes carrying out what the Lord requires of us. As the Nike slogan states so simply and directly: “Just do it!”

Listen to a musical rendering of Micah 6:8 offered by Maranatha! Singers: