Posts Tagged ‘Cave of Adullam’

David: Two poems from the Cave

August 28, 2022
The program cover of the Sight and Sound Theatre production of “David” in Lancaster, PA

This past Friday, my family and I traveled to Lancaster, PA, where we experienced an unforgettable event: the Sight and Sound musical and dramatic performance of “David.” The production was especially meaningful to me because of my intense identification with the Psalmist, prayer warrior, and overcomer, a man after God’s own heart and mine.

As a practicing poet, I have been influenced by the Psalmist, more than any other writer. As I reflected upon that amazing production, two original psalms came to mind, which I shared in a previous blog post.

Here is one of the most amazing accounts of radical transformation ever witnessed in the lives of the people of God, where a group of 400 desperate followers who are “in distress, in debt and discontented” join David in the Cave of Adullam.  When they eventually exit the cave, however, they are transformed into “David’s mighty men.” This account is recorded in I Samuel 22:1-2 and verses following. 

As is often my custom, I personalize the scriptures as I compose poetry. In this case, I composed two poems: one related to the account of a man who entered into the Cave of Adullam and the other related to a man transformed into one of “David’s mighty men” who exited the cave and what he learned in the process. 

A Cave of Adullam of My Own

David therefore departed from there and escaped to the cave of Adullam.

So when his brothers and all his father’s house heard it,

they went down there to him.

2And everyone who was in distress, everyone who was in debt,

and everyone who was discontented gathered to him.

So he became captain over them.

And there were about four hundred men with him.

I Samuel 22:1-2

“Your cave can be a good place”

Apostle David Pittman

In a place set aside for those who seek to hide,

Where thick darkness tries to hold back the light of day,

In debt, of no reputation, and stripped of pride,

Where obstacles on every side block my pathway;

Divorced from every resource that could comfort me,

Bankrupt and having goods of little or no worth.

Bound by lack, I have forgotten prosperity,

Though assured that seeds sown in the dark womb still give birth.

Distressed and discontented, in despair of life,

I live in a cave of Adullam of my own,

As I attempt to dispel confusion and strife

In this place where I measure how much I have grown.

In my cavern, teach me lessons I need to learn,

That I might also instruct others in return.

From  the Cave of Adullam into a Mighty Man 

These are the names of the mighty men whom David had: ….   

2 Samuel 23:8  

“Only the cave experience can produce mighty men.”          

 Apostle Eric L. Warren

As I prepare to leave my cave of Adullam, 

I reflect and ask just what lessons did I learn. 

My life is about to take yet another turn.   

While continuing to pursue my destiny,              

But content, I reveal my exit strategy.  

Stripped of pride that I might be clothed in righteousness,   

Unwavering hope has transformed former despair.  

I leave behind the chains of night with no regret.   

From my life spent in the cave I have much to share.     

Pressing toward a new day to be released from debt,   

I move beyond the seventh day into the eighth      

And exit the cave as a mighty man of faith.

The following video captures the essence of what I experienced:

The Cave (Cave of Adullam by Sara Groves) by Paul Siddall founder of THE CAVE!

All New Things Begin in Darkness: Transitioning Through Your Dark Night–Personal Poetic Responses

January 19, 2012

Exiting the Cave of Adullam, one transitions from darkness to light.

January 19, 2012

All New Things Begin in Darkness: Transitioning Through Your Dark Night by John Paul Jackson   was a prophetic word written in August, 2008. Originally the two poems based on the Cave of Adullam that were recently posted in a blog were placed with the following word of exhortation. Although we have chronologically moved four years beyond that specific date, believers are ever in transition, and so this word has current application. As I re-read this message, I thought of particular poems that I had written that could be applied at certain points. The following is the prophetic word in its entirety, interspersed with original poetry at strategic points. The message is broken into several parts to be posted over the next few days. Click here to view the message without the poetic inserts:

http://www.streamsministries.com/index.php?cat_id=32&page_id=141

This is a year of transition. 

As this is the eighth month already, no doubt you’re aware that transition means things are changing. If you allow God to move in your life and do what He wants to do, you’ll enjoy the change. And if you don’t … then you won’t, for obvious reasons.

In this e-letter, I would like to talk to you about something that goes hand in hand with transition. It is the hardest part of change, actually, and is what makes change so often difficult.

This introduction brings to mind the location of Gilgal, which Apostle Thamo Naidoo, author of Gilgal :  Biblical Principles Governing Transition into the  Apostolic Reformation, describes in the way:

“Gilgal is the place of constructive preparations or re-formation.  It symbolizes a sensitive and critical place in the life and experience of a people, ministry or nation in the earth.  This is a location in one’s spiritual journey where preparation is made for the next phase in the unfolding plan of God.  A season has been concluded, a new one is about to be ushered in, placing new demands on His people.  It is at Gilgal that the process of reconfiguration must take place.”

                                                                           

Waiting in Gilgal

If a man die, shall he live again?

all the days of my appointed time

will I wait, till my change come.

Job 14:14

Waiting in Gilgal. . . 

In the midnight harbor, place black as a raven,

Yielded and still in this new place of transition,

Seeking to do God’s will, in ready position,

To be launched from here to my desired haven.

 Waiting in Gilgal. . .

Groaning, travailing resounds from this place on earth,

In the birthing room where thoughts rise to the sublime;

Prolonged moments extend toward the fullness of time

Where agony precedes ecstasy in childbirth.

Waiting in Gilgal. . .

To be raised from the tomb, released from the cocoon;

Exhausted, I yearn to escape and touch the sky,

To be freed from these quarters of the butterfly,

Where to be transformed at last can come none too soon. 

Waiting in Gilgal. . .

This place demands sacrifice and obedience:

Not like Saul in Gilgal, foolish and immature,

But like Caleb, who with age, had strength to endure,

Fulfilled all God’s will and claimed his inheritance,

Waiting in Gilgal. . .

Jesus said that whoever loses his life will find it (Matthew 10:39). Growing spiritually is possible only if you’re willing to let go of the old in order to gain the new. In other words, you gain by losing; you give up your life in order to find it.
            But there’s a secret in that. What you need to give up is the thing that’s holding you back. You might think it is good, but it is actually keeping you from your destiny. It is a virus, an infection, a germ that needs eradicating before it can metastasize. If God asks you to give up something, it is only what will destroy you — i.e., this isn’t something you want to keep! 

Here’s the catcher: The in-between time when you’re coming to that conclusion is usually confusing, painful and completely black. You can’t see a thing, and you have no idea where you’re going.
           

Have you felt like that this year … yet? 

Joseph Hurst and God’s Chosen Vessels offer “They that Wait upon the Lord,” as an appropriate song to conclude this first portion of All New Things Begin in Darkness: Transitioning Through Your Dark Night by John Paul Jackson with personal poetic responses.  

            

The Cave of Adullam: Entering and Exiting

January 17, 2012

The Cave of Adullam can be a place of great learning for those who find themselves in desperate circumstances.

The Bible offers some of the most amazing accounts of radical transformation ever witnessed in the lives of the people of God. One such notable example is recorded in the Old Testament where a group of 400 desperate followers who are “in distress, in debt and discontented” join David in the Cave of Adullam.  When they eventually exit the cave, however, they are transformed into “David’s mighty men.” This account is recorded in I Samuel 22:1-2 and following, which I personalized and identified with in light of my circumstances.  As is often my custom, I personally apply the scriptures as I compose poetry. In this case I composed two poems: one related to the account of a man who entered into the Cave of Adullam and the other related to a man transformed into one of “David’s mighty men” who exited the cave. A Cave of Adullam of My Own

David therefore departed from there and escaped to the cave of Adullam.

So when his brothers and all his father’s house heard it,

they went down there to him.

2And everyone who was in distress, everyone who was in debt,

and everyone who was discontented gathered to him.

So he became captain over them.

And there were about four hundred men with him.

I Samuel 22:1-2

 

“Your cave can be a good place”

Apostle David Pittman

 

In a place set aside for those who seek to hide,

Where thick darkness tries to hold back the light of day,

In debt, of no reputation, and stripped of pride,

Where obstacles on every side block my pathway;

Divorced from every resource that could comfort me,

Bankrupt and having goods of little or no worth.

Bound by lack, I have forgotten prosperity,

Though assured that seeds sown in the dark womb still give birth.

Distressed and discontented, in despair of life,

I live in a cave of Adullam of my own,

As I attempt to dispel confusion and strife

In this place where I measure how much I have grown.

In my cavern, teach me lessons I need to learn,

That I might also instruct others in return.

 

From  the Cave of Adullam into a Mighty Man 

These are the names of the mighty men whom David had: ….   

2 Samuel 23:8                                                                               

 

Only the cave experience can produce mighty men.”          

 Apostle Eric L. Warren

As I prepare to leave my cave of Adullam,     

I reflect and ask just what lessons did I learn.                                                                                                                                                              

My life is about to take yet another turn.      

While continuing to pursue my destiny,                                                           

But content, I reveal my exit strategy.  

Stripped of pride that I might be clothed in righteousness,   

Unwavering hope has transformed former despair.  

I leave behind the chains of night with no regret.                                                                                                                                                                             

From my life spent in the cave I have much to share.                                                                                                                                                                

Pressing toward a new day to be released from debt,                                                                                                                                                                              

I move beyond the seventh day into the eighth      

And exit the cave as a mighty man of faith.

The copyrighted photograph of the actual Cave of Adullam was taken by Farrell Jenkins, who comments on the passage from I Samuel in  “David escaped to the Cave of Adullam,” an entry in Ferrell’s Travel Blog.

 Shelly Moore Band offers a marvelous remake of the classic hymn “Jesus I Come” which begins with these lines, reminiscent of the cave experience: “Out of my bondage, sorrow and night. . . .”: