Posts Tagged ‘Beatitudes’

Love your enemies

February 8, 2017

Matthew-5-44

The Verse of the Day for February 8, 2017 is found in the section of Scripture known as “The Beatitudes”:

Matthew 5:43-45 (NKJV):

[Love Your Enemies] “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I say to you, love your enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who spitefully use you and persecute you, that you may be sons of your Father in heaven; for He makes His sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust.

An entry on the Beatitudes is revised and re-posted here:

Part of the “Sermon on the Mount,” which some scholars maintain is really the “Sermon on the Plain,” the Beatitudes form a series of eight declarations that begin with the word “blessed.” Translated from the Greek word, makarios, “blessed” refers to a state of spiritual well-being and prosperity, expressing deep joy and fulfillment of the soul. The word has been translated, happy, fortunate, favored. A contemporary response when asked about one’s state of being is the expression, “blessed and highly favored.”

The following scripture memory song speaks of the passage in this way:

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”
They help us to see. They help us to be
All that God wants us to be.
We will be blessed and be a blessing in return
When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.
Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.
Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.
Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.
Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.
Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.
Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.
Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”
They help us to see. They help us to be
All that God wants us to be.
We will be blessed and be a blessing in return
When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”
When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

Listen to the Beatitude Song by Hillsong

Dr. Martin Luther King speaks of the life-transforming power of the love of God, making reference to the passage from the Beatitudes that states “Love your enemies.”

Blessed are you

October 1, 2016

matthew-5-11-12

Revised and re-posted is the Verse of the Day for October 1, 2016 found in the section of Scripture known as “The Beatitudes.” Here we find one of the celebrated passages from Matthew 5:11-12 in the Message Bible:

“Not only that—count yourselves blessed every time people put you down or throw you out or speak lies about you to discredit me. What it means is that the truth is too close for comfort and they are uncomfortable. You can be glad when that happens—give a cheer, even!—for though they don’t like it, I do! And all heaven applauds. And know that you are in good company. My prophets and witnesses have always gotten into this kind of trouble.

The New King James Version puts it this way:

Matthew 5:11-12

Blessed are you, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. Rejoice, and be exceedingly glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

Part of the “Sermon on the Mount,” which some scholars maintain is really the “Sermon on the Plain,” the Beatitudes form a series of eight declarations that begin with the word “blessed.” Translated from the Greek word, makarios, “blessed” refers to a state of spiritual well-being and prosperity, expressing deep joy and fulfillment of the soul. The word has been translated, happy, fortunate, favored. A contemporary response when asked about one’s state of being is the expression, “blessed and highly favored.”

The following scripture memory song speaks of the passage from Matthew 5 in this way:

The Beatitudes Are the “Be Attitudes”

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”

They help us to see. They help us to be

All that God wants us to be.

We will be blessed and be a blessing in return

When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

 

Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.

Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.

Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.

Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are you, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.

Rejoice, and be exceedingly glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

 

Blessed are you.  You shall be blessed.

You shall be blessed when you follow the “Be Attitudes.”

 

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”

They help us to see.  They help us to be

All that God wants us to be.

We will be blessed and be a blessing in return

When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

The Sermon on the Mount begins with Matthew 5 which offers the Beatitudes which are dramatically recited in this video:

Jami Smith offers this musical rendering of “The Beatitudes”:

Love your enemies

February 8, 2016

Matthew-5-44

Verse of the Day for February 8, 2016 comes from Matthew 5:43-45 (KJV):

Ye have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thine enemy. But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you; That ye may be the children of your Father which is in heaven: for he maketh his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.

This passage of scripture is taken from the “Sermon on the Mount,” which some scholars maintain is really the “Sermon on the Plain.” Part of that celebrated sermon includes exhortations as to how the followers of Jesus Christ should behave. The first part of Matthew 5 includes the “Beatitudes” which form a series of eight declarations that begin with the word “blessed.” Translated from the Greek word, makarios, “blessed” refers to a state of spiritual well-being and prosperity, expressing deep joy and fulfillment of the soul. The word has been translated, happy, fortunate, favored.

The following excerpt from a scripture memory song speaks of the introductory passage from Matthew 5 in this way:

The Beatitudes Are the “Be Attitudes”

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”

They help us to see. They help us to be

All that God wants us to be.

We will be blessed and be a blessing in return

When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

Following this specific introduction, Jesus continues to instruct followers as to how they should behave, contrasting what has been previously considered as acceptable behavior with a new approach, a new attitude, that the Savior offers.

Instead of only loving those who are close to you, followers are to “Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute you.” As the children of God, believers are to conduct themselves in the same way that their Father does. Since God is no respecter of persons, and He “makes his sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust,” followers should live their lives in the same manner.

A previous blog entry based on Ephesians 5:1 encouraged believers to be “followers of God” or imitators of their father and to walk in love as dear children. Indeed, to walk in love is the more excellent way. The following is an excerpt from that entry:

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

Ephesians 5:1-2:

Therefore become imitators of God [copy Him and follow His example], as well-beloved children [imitate their father]; and walk continually in love [that is, value one another—practice empathy and compassion, unselfishly seeking the best for others], just as Christ also loved you and gave Himself up for us, an offering and sacrifice to God [slain for you, so that it became] a sweet fragrance.

As believers we are to be imitators or mimics of God, our Father. In a similar manner to a young boy who wants to walk in his father’s shoes and wear his father’s hat, we are to be followers of God. Our lives are to be filled to overflowing with love. Our lives should be a reflection of the saying, “Like father, like son.”

We can thus, follow Christ’s example, as we offer our lives as sacrificial expression of our devotion to God.

Here is a poetic expression that also reminds us of how we should conduct our lives:

Walk in Love: Our Best Defense

Don’t bite the bait,

Don’t take offense.

Walk in the love of Jesus Christ.

It’s your best defense.

Scripture Memory Song

 

Always attacking, the Accuser stalks his prey,

Relentless in maligning Saints, both night and day.

Fiery darts of wicked words hurled in endless assaults

Reflect his evil deeds to magnify our faults.

He sets the traps, lures of the Spirit of Offense.

To counteract, we walk in love, our best defense.

He tries to trip us up, to be a stumbling block,

But we are ever vigilant around the clock.

Although we strive to reach the highest good,

Our motives are questioned; we are misunderstood.

Despite life’s challenges, we seek to rise above.

Though deeply wounded when betrayed, we still walk in love.

The thief comes to offend, falsely accuse and betray,

But we conquer through Christ, each time we trust and obey.

We close with this musical reminder urging us to “Love Your Enemies”:

Do unto others. . .

January 19, 2016

Matthew_7-12

The Verse of the Day for January 19, 2016 comes from the Sermon on the Mount, where Jesus Christ expresses a command that has become known as the “Golden Rule.”

Matthew 7:12 (NLT):

“Do to others whatever you would like them to do to you. This is the essence of all that is taught in the law and the prophets.”

This admonition follows the section of Matthew known as “The Beatitudes,” described in this manner in a children’s scripture memory song:

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”
They help us to see. They help us to be
All that God wants us to be.
We will be blessed and be a blessing in return
When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

Matthew 7:12 offers a guideline for human behavior that can be found in some of the writings of ancient civilizations as well. Other passages of Scripture also reiterate this same message:

Luke 6:31-36 (NLT)

31 Do to others as you would like them to do to you. ‎32 “If you love only those who love you, why should you get credit for that? Even sinners love those who love them! ‎33 And if you do good only to those who do good to you, why should you get credit? Even sinners do that much! ‎34 And if you lend money only to those who can repay you, why should you get credit? Even sinners will lend to other sinners for a full return. ‎35 “Love your enemies! Do good to them. Lend to them without expecting to be repaid. Then your reward from heaven will be very great, and you will truly be acting as children of the Most High, for he is kind to those who are unthankful and wicked. ‎36 You must be compassionate, just as your Father is compassionate.

In Matthew 22:40 the Lord points out that “The entire law and all the demands of the prophets are based on these two commandments”: Love God and love your neighbor as yourself.”

The Amplified Bible provides this exhortation which is a restatement of Romans 13:8-9:

8 Owe nothing to anyone except to love and seek the best for one another; for he who [unselfishly] loves his neighbor has fulfilled the [essence of the] law [relating to one’s fellowman]. 9 The commandments, “YOU SHALL NOT COMMIT ADULTERY, YOU SHALL NOT MURDER, YOU SHALL NOT STEAL, YOU SHALL NOT COVET,” and any other commandment are summed up in this statement: “YOU SHALL LOVE YOUR NEIGHBOR AS YOURSELF.”

In reflecting on these verses, we also recognize “The first and great commandment: To love God with all your heart, soul, mind and strength.” Believers are further instructed to “love your neighbor as yourself.” When we love God, first of all, and then love others to the same degree that we love ourselves, we fulfill the law of love which is the highest expression of God, who is love.

Finally, Galatians 5:14 puts it this way:

For the whole law can be summed up in this one command: “Love your neighbor as yourself.”

Jesus Christ, in addressing the multitude gathered to hear him, offers a profound one-sentence statement that embraces all human behavior whereby he expresses God’s desire for all humanity.

Taken from the Sermon on the Mount which begins with Matthew 5, the Beatitudes serve as a prelude to the admonition of Matthew 7:12. This familiar passage is dramatically recited in this video:

Beatitudes are the “be attitudes”

October 1, 2015

Matthew-5_11-12The Verse of the Day for October 1, 2015 is found in the section of Scripture known as “The Beatitudes.” Originally posted a year ago, the following entry is re-posted below:

Matthew 5:11-12 (KJV):

Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake. Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

Part of the “Sermon on the Mount,” which some scholars maintain is really the “Sermon on the Plain,” the Beatitudes form a series of eight declarations that begin with the word “blessed.” Translated from the Greek word, makarios, “blessed” refers to a state of spiritual well-being and prosperity, expressing deep joy and fulfillment of the soul. The word has been translated, happy, fortunate, favored. A contemporary response when asked about one’s state of being is the expression, “blessed and highly favored.”

The following scripture memory song speaks of the passage from Matthew 5 in this way:

The Beatitudes Are the “Be Attitudes”

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”

They help us to see. They help us to be

All that God wants us to be.

We will be blessed and be a blessing in return

When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.

Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.

Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.

Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.

Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

Blessed are you. You shall be blessed.

You shall be blessed when you follow the “Be Attitudes.”

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”

They help us to see. They help us to be

All that God wants us to be.

We will be blessed and be a blessing in return

When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

The Sermon on the Mount begins with Matthew 5 which offers the Beatitudes which are dramatically recited in this video:

Love your enemies

February 8, 2015

Matthew-5-44

The Verse of the Day for February 8, 2015 is found in the section of Scripture known as “The Beatitudes”:

Matthew 5:43-45 (New Living Translation)

[Teaching about Love for Enemies] “You have heard the law that says, ‘Love your neighbor’ and hate your enemy. But I say, love your enemies! Pray for those who persecute you! In that way, you will be acting as true children of your Father in heaven. For he gives his sunlight to both the evil and the good, and he sends rain on the just and the unjust alike.

Below is a blog entry on the Beatitudes that is revised and re-posted here:

Part of the “Sermon on the Mount,” which some scholars maintain is really the “Sermon on the Plain,” the Beatitudes form a series of eight declarations that begin with the word “blessed.” Translated from the Greek word, makarios, “blessed” refers to a state of spiritual well-being and prosperity, expressing deep joy and fulfillment of the soul. The word has been translated, happy, fortunate, favored. A contemporary response when asked about one’s state of being is the expression, “blessed and highly favored.”

The following scripture memory song speaks of the passage from Matthew 5 in this way:

The Beatitudes Are the “Be Attitudes”

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”

They help us to see. They help us to be

All that God wants us to be.

We will be blessed and be a blessing in return

When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

 

Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.

Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.

Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.

Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.

Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

 

Blessed are you. You shall be blessed.

You shall be blessed when you follow the “Be Attitudes.”

 

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”

They help us to see. They help us to be

All that God wants us to be.

We will be blessed and be a blessing in return

When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

Dr. Martin Luther King speaks of the transforming power of love and makes reference to the passage from the Beatitudes that states “love your enemies.”

A closer look at Matthew 7:12

January 19, 2015

Matthew_7-12

“Do to others whatever you would like them to do to you. This is the essence of all that is taught in the law and the prophets.” Matthew 7:12 (NLT)

The Verse of the Day for January 19, 2015 comes from the Sermon on the Mount, where Jesus Christ expresses a command that has become known as the “Golden Rule.” This guideline for human behavior can be found in some of the writings of ancient civilizations as well. The blog entry for the Verse of the Day posted a year ago identified some of these parallel expressions: Matthew 7:12: The Golden Rule. Other passages of Scripture also reiterate this same message:

Luke 6:31-36 (NLT)

31 Do to others as you would like them to do to you. 32 “If you love only those who love you, why should you get credit for that? Even sinners love those who love them! 33 And if you do good only to those who do good to you, why should you get credit? Even sinners do that much! 34 And if you lend money only to those who can repay you, why should you get credit? Even sinners will lend to other sinners for a full return. 35 “Love your enemies! Do good to them. Lend to them without expecting to be repaid. Then your reward from heaven will be very great, and you will truly be acting as children of the Most High, for he is kind to those who are unthankful and wicked. 36 You must be compassionate, just as your Father is compassionate.

In Matthew 22:40 the Lord points out that “The entire law and all the demands of the prophets are based on these two commandments”: Love God and love your neighbor as yourself.”

Paul states in Romans 13:8-9 (NLT):

Owe nothing to anyone—except for your obligation to love one another. If you love your neighbor, you will fulfill the requirements of God’s law.

For the commandments say, “You must not commit adultery. You must not murder. You must not steal. You must not covet.” These—and other such commandments—are summed up in this one commandment: “Love your neighbor as yourself.”

Finally, Galatians 5:14 puts it this way:

For the whole law can be summed up in this one command: “Love your neighbor as yourself.”

Jesus Christ, in addressing the multitude gathered to hear him, offers a profound one-sentence statement that embraces all human behavior whereby he expresses God’s desire for all humanity.

The Sermon on the Mount begins with Matthew 5 which offers the Beatitudes which are dramatically recited in this video which is a prelude to the Verse of the Day taken from Matthew 7:12

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes”

October 1, 2014

Matthew-5_11-12

The Verse of the Day for October 1, 2014 is found in the section of Scripture known as “The Beatitudes”:

Matthew 5:11-12 (KJV)

Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.

Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

Part of the “Sermon on the Mount,” the Beatitudes form a series of eight declarations that begin with the word “blessed.” Translated from the Greek word, makarios, “blessed” refers to a state of spiritual well-being and prosperity, expressing deep joy and fulfillment of the soul. The word has been translated, happy, fortunate, favored. A contemporary response when asked about one’s state of being is the expression, “blessed and highly favored.”

The following scripture memory song speaks of the passage from Matthew 5 in this way:

The Beatitudes Are the “Be Attitudes”

 

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”

They help us to see. They help us to be

All that God wants us to be.

We will be blessed and be a blessing in return

When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted.

Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth.

Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.

Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy.

Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God.

Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God.

Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake.

Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven: for so persecuted they the prophets which were before you.

Blessed are you. You shall be blessed.

You shall be blessed when you follow the “Be Attitudes.”

The Beatitudes are the “Be Attitudes.”

They help us to see. They help us to be

All that God wants us to be.

We will be blessed and be a blessing in return

When we learn to follow the “Be Attitudes.”

 

The Sermon on the Mount begins with Matthew 5 which offers the Beatitudes which are dramatically recited in this video:

Matthew 7:12: The Golden Rule

January 19, 2014

Matthew_7-12

In the Verse of the Day for January 19, 2014, taken from the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus Christ expresses a command that has become known as the “Golden Rule.”  In a discussion of “Who invented the Golden Rule?” Dangerousintersection.org refers to a site called Palatine Hill, which lists some of the oldest formulations of the Golden Rule in reverse chronological order:

  • Ancient Egypt. – circa 2000 BCE “Do for one who may do for you, That you may cause him thus to do.” – The Tale of the Eloquent Peasant 109-110,
  • Hebrew Bible – circa 700 BCE “You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against your countrymen. Love your fellow as yourself: I am the LORD.”
  • Zoroastrianism. – circa 600 BCE “That nature only is good when it shall not do unto another whatever is not good for its own self.” – Dadistan-i-Dinik 94:5,
  • Buddhism. – circa 500 BCE “Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.” – Udana-Varga 5:18,
  • Confucianism. – circa 500 BCE “What you do not want done to yourself, do not do to others.” Analects of Confucius 15:24,
  • Socrates. – circa 400 BCE “Do not do to others what would anger you if done to you by others.”

Even though the human heart is deceitful above all things and desperately wicked and no one can know it (Jeremiah 17:9), there is a corresponding desire to do good and to do the right thing. Paul personalizes this struggle and speaks of the conflict inherent in believers:

Matthew 7:18-22:

For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh,) dwelleth no good thing: for to will is present with me; but how to perform that which is good I find not.

19 For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.

20 Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me.

21 I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me.

22 For I delight in the law of God after the inward man:

Jesus Christ offers a one-sentence statement that embraces all human behavior whereby he expresses God’s desire for all humanity in what has become known as “The Golden Rule.”

The Sermon on the Mount begins with Matthew 5 which offers the Beatitudes which are dramatically recited in this video which is a prelude to the verse in Matthew 7: