Posts Tagged ‘2 Peter 3:9’

Goodness leads to repentance

June 28, 2018

2 Peter 3--9 new

The Verse of the Day for June 28, 2018 reveals aspects of God’s character and His desire for His people:

2 Peter 3:9 (New King James Version):

The Lord is not slack concerning His promise, as some count slackness, but is longsuffering toward us, not willing that any should perish but that all should come to repentance.

The Amplified Bible explains in greater detail:

The Lord does not delay [as though He were unable to act] and is not slow about His promise, as some count slowness, but is [extraordinarily] patient toward you, not wishing for any to perish but for all to come to repentance.

Regarding every promise of God, we must remember this:

Throughout the Scriptures God reveals Himself as one who keeps His promises. God Almighty, creator of the heavens and the Earth, is faithful and true, the original “Promise Keeper” who cannot lie. The Word of God declares God has given us exceeding great and precious promises that shall all be fulfilled:

For all the promises of God in Him are Yes, and in Him Amen, to the glory of God through us.

God’s desire for humanity is that they choose to follow the path of life that leads to everlasting joy and fulfillment in Him, as opposed to following the path that leads to death and destruction. Here is another reminder:

Romans 2:4 (NKJV):

Or do you despise the riches of His goodness, forbearance, and longsuffering, not knowing that the goodness of God leads you to repentance?

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

Or do you have no regard for the wealth of His kindness and tolerance and patience [in withholding His wrath]? Are you [actually] unaware or ignorant [of the fact] that God’s kindness leads you to repentance [that is, to change your inner self, your old way of thinking—seek His purpose for your life]?

Repentance is the state of turning from one path to follow another. Throughout the Old Testament, God’s plea toward Israel was that they turn from idols to serve the true and living God. The term refers to turning around or turning away from, a conversion which involves obedience to God’s revealed will, placing trust in Him, turning away from all evil and ungodliness. We could think of it as pursuing a new path, choosing no longer to walk in darkness, but choosing to:

Walk in the Light

Walk in the light, the beautiful light.

Come where the dew drops of mercy shine bright,

Shine all around us by day and by night–

Jesus, the Light of the World.

Traditional Gospel Song

 

Then Jesus spoke to them again, saying,  

I am the light of the world. He who follows Me

shall not walk in darkness, but have the light of life.”

 John 8:12 (NKJV)

 

We begin when we come to Him who alone is the Light

And repent, following a new path immediately.

We must forsake the world and leave behind the chains of night.

We consecrate ourselves to God, set apart wholly

To worship the Lord freely with clean hands and a pure heart,

Formed for His glory, as we develop a strong prayer life.

The Word of God rooted within us will never depart.

We will study the Word of Truth, the lamp that lights our way:

Once we have been enlightened, we now help others to see.

We will be a voice for God, not just an echo in the crowd.

We are true servants of the Light, despite the endless strife.

We will make a joyful noise and sing His praises out loud.

We forsake unrighteous paths, no longer in ignorance,

Knowing the goodness of God is leading to repentance.

The closing line of the poem refers to Romans 2:4 which again raises these questions:

Don’t you see how wonderfully kind, tolerant, and patient God is with you? Does this mean nothing to you? Can’t you see that his kindness is intended to turn you from your sin?

Kari Jobe closes with a song of worship inspired by Romans 2:4: ”You are Good”

 

The patience of God and the patience of Job

June 28, 2017

The Verse of the Day for June 28, 2017 brings to our remembrance that God is faithful to fulfill each of His promises, and that He is also patient:

2 Peter 3:9 (Message Bible):

[The Day the Sky Will Collapse] Don’t overlook the obvious here, friends. With God, one day is as good as a thousand years, a thousand years as a day. God isn’t late with his promise as some measure lateness. He is restraining himself on account of you, holding back the End because he doesn’t want anyone lost. He’s giving everyone space and time to change.

The New Living Translation renders the verse this way:

The Lord isn’t really being slow about his promise, as some people think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants everyone to repent.

At times it may appear that our Father is slow when He does not respond to our requests when we think that He should. Just as God is patient, He instructs us to be patient. We must remember that God may not be early, but He is never late. Just as God is being patient toward us, we are, likewise, encouraged to be patient toward God and toward one another:

Another related verse is found in Hebrews 10:36 in the Amplified Bible:

For you have need of steadfast patience and endurance, so that you may perform and fully accomplish the will of God, and thus receive and carry away [and enjoy to the full] what is promised.

The following excerpt from a previous blog post offered a more detailed discussion of the character trait of patience or endurance or perseverance, meaning steadfastly bearing up under and remaining faithful while waiting. Patience, as a fruit of the Spirit should be evident in our lives, as we wait on the Lord. One of the words related to “patience” or being patient as a verb means “to stay, remain, abide”, literally abiding under; figuratively, to undergo, i.e. bear (trials), have fortitude, to persevere — abide, endure. The word translated patience as a noun is also translated: endurance, patient enduring, perseverance, and steadfastness.

In addition, another passage from James 5:7-11 stresses the importance of patience and provides an excellent example of both the verb and the noun in a particular individual who embodies the character trait of patient endurance:

Therefore be patient, brethren, until the coming of the Lord. See how the farmer waits for the precious fruit of the earth, waiting patiently for it until it receives the early and latter rain. 8You also be patient. Establish your hearts, for the coming of the Lord is at hand. 9Do not grumble against one another, brethren, lest you be condemned. Behold, the Judge is standing at the door! 10My brethren, take the prophets, who spoke in the name of the Lord, as an example of suffering and patience. 11Indeed we count them blessed who endure. You have heard of the perseverance of Job and seen the end intended by the Lord—that the Lord is very compassionate and merciful.

In discussing Job, whom Chuck Swindoll described as a “man of heroic endurance,” we also note some distinctive features of the Book of Job. Although it is not listed with the Pentateuch, the first five books of the Bible, E.W. Bullinger and other Bible scholars believe that the first book written was the Book of Job, believed to be composed by Moses. Job, was, indeed, a real person, and his account is one of the first demonstrations of many spiritual principles: God is “full of compassion and tender mercy” and that he rewards those who demonstrate “patience.”

Recall Job 42:10:

And the LORD turned the captivity of Job, when he prayed for his friends: also the
LORD gave Job twice as much as he had before.

In his book, The Gatekeepers, Nate Wolf has this to say about the classic Biblical example of endurance:

Job’s patience was the golden secret that helped him overcome the pain he faced. Patience is more than just having the ability to not become angry in a difficult situation. Patience is the power that will carry you through the painful moments of life into the pleasurable moments of life. . . . The patience of God within you will always outlast the pain that’s trying to come upon you. . . . Patience is the power that will keep you in the proper place and mindset, during discomfort or pain, until you possess your final promise and reach your ultimate purpose.

The Verse of the Day and other related passages along with the Book of Job demonstrate the compassionate and merciful qualities of God, who is patient and who rewards those who demonstrate “patience.” Our discussion also brings to mind a statement from Graham Cooke  used to introduce this poem:

A Prayer for Patience

“My suggestion for people in a season of birth or

upgrade is to write out a prayer for patience and pray it every day.”

Graham Cooke

 

For you have need of steadfast patience and endurance,   

so that you may perform and fully accomplish the will of God,                                                    

and thus receive and carry away [and enjoy to the full] what is promised.

Hebrews 10:36 (Amplified Bible)

 

We look back and pause and then look ahead to see
All that God is and all He plans for us to be.
We still journey down the road less traveled by
And pray that patience may serve as a trusted ally.
We must say “No” to the pressures of this life
And say “Yes” to the rest God gives, despite the strife.
As we stay our minds on Him, we abide in peace.
When we praise God, works of the enemy decrease.
May we remain and not fall by the wayside as some
But like Job wait until at last our change shall come.
Patient endurance seems delayed for some reason,
But fruit abounds to those who wait in this season.
We pray that in this time of transition and shift
That we embrace waiting as a wonderful gift.

We conclude with John Waller offering “While I’m Waiting”:

Prayer for patience

June 28, 2015

NASB_2_Peter_3-9

The Verse of the Day brings to our remembrance that God is faithful to fulfill each of His promises.

2 Peter 3:9 (NLT)

The Lord isn’t really being slow about his promise, as some people think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants everyone to repent.

At times it may appear that our Father is slow when He does not respond to our requests when we think that He should. Just as God is patient, He instructs us to be patient. We must remember that God may not be early, but He is never late. Just as God is being patient toward us, we are, likewise, encouraged to be patient:

Hebrews 10:36 in the Amplified Bible puts it this way:

For you have need of steadfast patience and endurance, so that you may perform and fully accomplish the will of God, and thus receive and carry away [and enjoy to the full] what is promised.

In a previous blog entry, I discussed patience in light of the Greek word hupomone which is translated endurance, perseverance, steadfastness. As a verb, hupomeno is rendered to abide, endure; to stay under, to undergo, to have fortitude, to persevere.

James 5:11 provides an excellent example of both the verb hupomeno and the noun hupomone in a particular individual who embodies the character trait of patient endurance. The King James Version offers this rendering which contains a familiar phrase that encompasses the character trait most often associated with Job:

Behold, we count them happy which endure. Ye have heard of the patience of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; the Lord is very pitiful, and of tender mercy.

The Book of Job demonstrates the compassionate and merciful qualities of God, who is patient and who rewards those who demonstrate “patience.” A number of years ago I heard a statement from Graham Cooke regarding patience, and his words who inspired this poem:

A Prayer for Patience

“My suggestion for people in a season of birth or upgrade                                                                                                                                

is to write out a prayer for patience and pray it every day.”  

Graham Cooke

 

For you have need of steadfast patience and endurance,                                                                  

so that you may perform and fully accomplish the will of God,                                                   

and thus receive and carry away [and enjoy to the full] what is promised.

Hebews 10:36 (Amplified Bible)

I look back and pause and then look ahead to see

Clearly who God is, who He wants to be for me.

I still journey down the road less traveled by

And pray that patience may serve as a trusted ally.

I must say “No” to the pressures of this life

And say “Yes” to the rest God gives, despite the strife.

As I stay my mind on Him, I abide in peace.

When I praise God, works of the enemy decrease.

May I remain and not fall by the wayside as some

But like Job wait until at last my change shall come.

Patient endurance seems delayed for some reason,

But fruit abounds to those who wait in their season.

I pray that in this time of transition and shift

That I embrace waiting as a wonderful gift.