Posts Tagged ‘2 Peter 1:4’

Goodness leads to repentance

June 28, 2018

2 Peter 3--9 new

The Verse of the Day for June 28, 2018 reveals aspects of God’s character and His desire for His people:

2 Peter 3:9 (New King James Version):

The Lord is not slack concerning His promise, as some count slackness, but is longsuffering toward us, not willing that any should perish but that all should come to repentance.

The Amplified Bible explains in greater detail:

The Lord does not delay [as though He were unable to act] and is not slow about His promise, as some count slowness, but is [extraordinarily] patient toward you, not wishing for any to perish but for all to come to repentance.

Regarding every promise of God, we must remember this:

Throughout the Scriptures God reveals Himself as one who keeps His promises. God Almighty, creator of the heavens and the Earth, is faithful and true, the original “Promise Keeper” who cannot lie. The Word of God declares God has given us exceeding great and precious promises that shall all be fulfilled:

For all the promises of God in Him are Yes, and in Him Amen, to the glory of God through us.

God’s desire for humanity is that they choose to follow the path of life that leads to everlasting joy and fulfillment in Him, as opposed to following the path that leads to death and destruction. Here is another reminder:

Romans 2:4 (NKJV):

Or do you despise the riches of His goodness, forbearance, and longsuffering, not knowing that the goodness of God leads you to repentance?

The Amplified Bible puts it this way:

Or do you have no regard for the wealth of His kindness and tolerance and patience [in withholding His wrath]? Are you [actually] unaware or ignorant [of the fact] that God’s kindness leads you to repentance [that is, to change your inner self, your old way of thinking—seek His purpose for your life]?

Repentance is the state of turning from one path to follow another. Throughout the Old Testament, God’s plea toward Israel was that they turn from idols to serve the true and living God. The term refers to turning around or turning away from, a conversion which involves obedience to God’s revealed will, placing trust in Him, turning away from all evil and ungodliness. We could think of it as pursuing a new path, choosing no longer to walk in darkness, but choosing to:

Walk in the Light

Walk in the light, the beautiful light.

Come where the dew drops of mercy shine bright,

Shine all around us by day and by night–

Jesus, the Light of the World.

Traditional Gospel Song

 

Then Jesus spoke to them again, saying,  

I am the light of the world. He who follows Me

shall not walk in darkness, but have the light of life.”

 John 8:12 (NKJV)

 

We begin when we come to Him who alone is the Light

And repent, following a new path immediately.

We must forsake the world and leave behind the chains of night.

We consecrate ourselves to God, set apart wholly

To worship the Lord freely with clean hands and a pure heart,

Formed for His glory, as we develop a strong prayer life.

The Word of God rooted within us will never depart.

We will study the Word of Truth, the lamp that lights our way:

Once we have been enlightened, we now help others to see.

We will be a voice for God, not just an echo in the crowd.

We are true servants of the Light, despite the endless strife.

We will make a joyful noise and sing His praises out loud.

We forsake unrighteous paths, no longer in ignorance,

Knowing the goodness of God is leading to repentance.

The closing line of the poem refers to Romans 2:4 which again raises these questions:

Don’t you see how wonderfully kind, tolerant, and patient God is with you? Does this mean nothing to you? Can’t you see that his kindness is intended to turn you from your sin?

Kari Jobe closes with a song of worship inspired by Romans 2:4: ”You are Good”

 

Very great and precious promises

March 12, 2018

The Verse of the Day for March 12, 2018 reveals exactly what God, our magnanimous Father, has given to each of us as believers and what we have as a result of his generosity:

2 Peter 1:4 (NIV):

Through these he has given us his very great and precious promises, so that through them you may participate in the divine nature, having escaped the corruption in the world caused by evil desires.

No matter how you phrase it, the promises given to us are rare and extraordinary expressions of love: The American Standard Version speaks of “precious and exceeding great promises,” while the Amplified Bible says they are “precious and magnificent promises [of inexpressible value].” According to the Message Bible, these “absolutely terrific promises” are “of great worth and no amount of money can buy them,” says the New Living Version.

One of the distinguishing attributes of God is that He not only makes promises whose value is beyond calculating, but He keeps every promise that He makes. A recent blog entry described God in this way:

Promise Keeper

God Almighty, creator of the heavens and the Earth, is faithful and true, the original “Promise Keeper” who cannot lie. The Word of God declares God has given us exceeding great and precious promises that shall all be fulfilled:

His will is to fulfill every promise He has spoken.
We know no word of the Lord can ever be broken.
Each promise fulfilled is but a foretaste, a token.

The Verse of the Day also brings to mind this passage from 2 Corinthians 1:19-20 (New Living Translation)

19 For Jesus Christ, the Son of God, does not waver between “Yes” and “No.” He is the one whom Silas, Timothy, and I preached to you, and as God’s ultimate “Yes,” he always does what he says.
20 For all of God’s promises have been fulfilled in Christ with a resounding “Yes!” And through Christ, our “Amen” (which means “Yes”) ascends to God for his glory.

As believers we recognize that the Word of God is energetic and life-giving, for each word in the Word of Life is an expression of power. Luke 1:37 in the King James Version says, “For with God nothing shall be impossible.” The American Standard Version offers this translation: “For no word from God shall be void of power.” Indeed, there is life-changing power in a single word from the Word. Think about the expression used to describe all the promises of God: “Yes!” Used to show agreement or endorsement, “yes” often indicates an affirmative reply. Certainly we are aware of that the word as an interjection or strong expression of joy, pleasure, or approval. When a player scores the winning shot in an overtime game, often excited fans respond with a vigorous “Yes! Way to go!”

In discussing the essence of God’s promises I thought of this poetic response:

“Tomorrow Is Today’s Promise”

For you have need of patience, that,
after you have done the will of God,
you might receive the promise.

Hebrews 10:36

We work in faith, labor in love and wait in hope,
Patient in all our trials that test and refine.
Despite the times, we perceive His divine design
And see with new eyes far beyond our narrow scope.
After doing all God’s will, we receive the promise.
We come through intense fires as a precious gem.
Rewards await those who endure to receive them,
As time swiftly passes with each sunset and sunrise.
Yesterday was the promise of the day before.
Today is yesterday’s tomorrow as it unfolds:
A gift full of potential and all that it holds.
Tomorrow is today’s promise waiting in store.
Past, present and future all merge in Christ, the Lord,
Who upholds all things by the power of His Word.

Matt Redman offers “Yes and Amen,” the perfect expression in song regarding the promises of God.

 

No disappointment in God

April 5, 2017

Romans 10--11

Instead of the usual Verse of the Day for March 5, 2017, we want to take a look at another Quote of the Day, based on the Faith:

“Faith and trust will never meet with disappointment.”

The statement reiterates the message of assurance found in Romans 9:33 (AMP):

As it is written and forever remains written, “Behold I am laying in Zion a Stone of stumbling and a Rock of offense; And he who believes in Him [whoever adheres to, trusts in, and relies on Him] will not be disappointed [in his expectations].”

Romans 10:11 (AMP) also reinforces the same promise:

For the Scripture says, “Whoever believes in Him [whoever adheres to, trusts in, and relies on Him] will not be disappointed [in his expectations].”

Here is an excerpt from a previous blog entry that examined the same subject of “disappointment”:

The word is “disappointment” is defined as “a feeling of dissatisfaction, the emotion felt when a strongly held anticipation is not fulfilled.” As we go about our daily lives, all of us have experienced disappointment to some degree. We must recognize, however, that disappointments occurred when situations have not turned out the way we thought they would. In actuality, our disappointments – every one of them – come from the “add-ons” we attach, those things God never promised but which we add to God’s promises. In every situation whereby we might feel disappointed, we need to focus on the Word of God, and be grateful for the promises that we have rather than dwelling on what we do not have, which ultimately leads to being disappointed:

2 Peter 1:4(NKJV) reminds of the vast reservoir of God’s pledges:

by which have been given to us exceedingly great and precious promises, that through these you may be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.

2 Corinthians 1:20 (NKJV):

For all the promises of God in Him are Yes, and in Him Amen, to the glory of God through us.

We must continually look to God and to those exceedingly great and precious promises in His Word. As we do this we recognize that God does not disappoint nor fail to fulfill His promises. No, He does not prevent hopes or expectations from being realized, which is how we define the verb to “disappoint.” One is said to be “disappointed” or sad or displeased because one’s own hopes or expectations have not been fulfilled.

We cannot hold onto any feelings of being disappointed!  In reality, feelings of disappointments consist of our hopes and expectations. Disappointments come when God does not come through at the time that we “expect” Him to nor in the way we “expect” Him to. Disappointment is the result of “failed expectations” on our part.

We must remember that there is no failure in God, for God is good. The very essence of God is goodness. Indeed, Jesus Christ said, “There is none good but the Father.” Because God is good, “. . . all things work together for the good, to them that love God, to them that are the called according to His purpose.” (Romans 8:28) So no matter how bad the situation may appear to be, it will work together for the good. When facing what appears to be disappointing aspects in life, we can look to the Word of God and find that those who trust in God will not be disappointed.

Proverbs 23:18 (AMP) further reminds us:

For surely there is a latter end [a future and a reward], and your hope and expectation shall not be cut off.

Jeremiah 29:11 (NKJV) also reminds us God’s concern for our future or “final outcome”:

For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope.

The Amplified Bible again expresses this truth this way:

For I know the thoughts and plans that I have for you, says the Lord, thoughts and plans for welfare and peace and not for evil, to give you hope in your final outcome.

Edith Lillian Young has found a simple way of countering disappointment simply by making a small change which can result in a big change in our attitude toward this particular “deadly emotion.”

Disappointment

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
Change one letter, then I see
That the thwarting of my purpose
Is God’s better choice for me.
His appointment must be a blessing,
though it may come in disguise,
for the end from the beginning
open to His wisdom lies.

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
Whose? The Lord, who loves me best,
Understands and knows me fully,
Who my faith and love would test;
For, like a loving earthly parent,
He rejoices when He knows
That His child accepts, unquestioned,
All that from His wisdom flows.

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
“No good thing will He withhold,”
From denials oft we gather
Treasures of His love untold,
Well He knows each broken purpose
Leads to fuller, deeper trust,
And the end of all His dealings
Proves our God is wise and just.

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
Lord, I take it, then, as such.
Like the clay in hands of potter,
Yielding wholly to Thy touch.
All my life’s plan is Thy molding,
Not one single choice be mine;
Let me answer, unrepining –
“Father, not my will, but Thine.”

Phil Keaggy offers a musical rendition of these same lyrics:

Disappointment transformed: His appointment

January 19, 2017

romans_10-11

Instead of the usual Verse of the Day for January 19, 2017, we want to take a look at a Word of the Day, as we make a slight variation and transform the word “disappointment” from place of discontentment into a positive state of acceptance just by changing a single letter. The word is “disappointment” is defined as “a feeling of dissatisfaction, the emotion felt when a strongly held anticipation is not fulfilled.” As we go about our daily lives, all of us have experienced disappointment to some degree. We must recognize, however, that disappointments occurred when situations have not turned out the way we thought they would. In actuality, our disappointments – every one of them – come from the “add-ons” we attach, those things God never promised but which we add to God’s promises. In every situation whereby we might feel disappointed, we need to focus on the Word of God, and be grateful for the promises that we have rather than dwelling on what we do not have, which ultimately leads to being disappointed:

2 Peter 1:4(NKJV) reminds of the vast reservoir of God’s pledges:

by which have been given to us exceedingly great and precious promises, that through these you may be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.

2 Corinthians 1:20(NKJV)

For all the promises of God in Him are Yes, and in Him Amen, to the glory of God through us.

We must continually look to God and to those exceedingly great and precious promises in His Word. As we do this we recognize that God does not disappoint nor fail to fulfill His promises. No, He does not prevent hopes or expectations from being realized, which is how we define the verb to “disappoint.” One is said to be “disappointed” or sad or displeased because one’s own hopes or expectations have not been fulfilled.

We cannot hold onto any feelings of being disappointed!  In reality, feelings of disappointments consist of our hopes and expectations. Disappointments come when God does not come through at the time that we “expect” Him to nor in the way we “expect” Him to. Disappointment is the result of “failed expectations” on our part. The late Kim Clement spoke of the “power of presuppositions.”  He goes on to say that “Presupposition is an enemy to destiny. . . .” We may sense that God has failed when our lives fail to unfold according to our prescribed patterns and plans, as expressed in this poem:                                   

Presupposition: Enemy to Destiny

“Known to God from eternity are all His works.”

Acts 15:18

 

“Presupposition is an enemy to destiny. . . .”

Kim Clement

 

Prophetic words that God desires to bring to pass

Wither as unripened fruit that fails to mature,

As our lives seem to diminish from gold to brass.

In the midst of changing times, of this we must be sure:

“Presupposition is an enemy to destiny.”

Our failed expectations shipwreck us and distort

Our view of the place where we thought that we would be,

As we accept what appears to be the last resort.

Though this downward spiral plummets to depths of despair,

We trust our all-wise Father who makes no mistakes,

For God heals broken lives that seem beyond repair

With exquisite beauty that fills all that He makes.

Known to God are all His works from eternity:

His perfect will unfolds to those with eyes to see.

We must remember that there is no failure in God, for God is good. The very essence of God is goodness. Indeed, Jesus Christ said, “There is none good but the Father.” Because God is good, “. . . all things work together for the good, to them that love God, to them that are the called according to His purpose.” (Romans 8:28) So no matter how bad the situation may appear to be, it will work together for the good. When facing what appears to be disappointing aspects in life, we can look to the Word of God and find that those who trust in God will not be disappointed.

The Psalmist also reminds us that God will not let those who trust Him to be disappointed

Psalm 22:5 (AMP):

They cried to You and were delivered; they trusted in, leaned on, and confidently relied on You, and were not ashamed or confounded or disappointed.

Paul reiterates this point:

Romans 10:11(AMP):

The Scripture says, No man who believes in Him [who adheres to, relies on, and trusts in Him] will [ever] be put to shame or be disappointed.

Above all, we must remember this:

Numbers 23:19(KJV):

God is not a man, that he should lie; neither the son of man, that he should repent: hath he said,   and shall he not do it? or hath he spoken, and shall he not make it good?

Proverbs 23:18 (AMP) reminds us:

For surely there is a latter end [a future and a reward], and your hope and expectation shall not be cut off.

Jeremiah 29:11 (NKJV) also reminds us God’s concern for our future or “final outcome”:

For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope.

The Amplified Bible expresses this truth this way:

For I know the thoughts and plans that I have for you, says the Lord, thoughts and plans for welfare and peace and not for evil, to give you hope in your final outcome.

Edith Lillian Young has found a simple way of countering disappointment simply by making a small change which can result in a big change in our attitude toward this particular “deadly emotion.”

Disappointment

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
Change one letter, then I see
That the thwarting of my purpose
Is God’s better choice for me.
His appointment must be a blessing,
though it may come in disguise,
for the end from the beginning
open to His wisdom lies.

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
Whose? The Lord, who loves me best,
Understands and knows me fully,
Who my faith and love would test;
For, like a loving earthly parent,
He rejoices when He knows
That His child accepts, unquestioned,
All that from His wisdom flows.

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
“No good thing will He withhold,”
From denials oft we gather
Treasures of His love untold,
Well He knows each broken purpose
Leads to fuller, deeper trust,
And the end of all His dealings
Proves our God is wise and just.

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
Lord, I take it, then, as such.
Like the clay in hands of potter,
Yielding wholly to Thy touch.
All my life’s plan is Thy molding,
Not one single choice be mine;
Let me answer, unrepining –
“Father, not my will, but Thine.”

Phil Keaggy offers a musical rendition of these lyrics: