Posts Tagged ‘2 Corinthians 5:13’

Call to holy living: Be sober

January 6, 2016

1_Peter_1-13

The Verse of the Day for January 6, 2016 comes from 1 Peter 1:13 (NLT) offered as “A Call to Holy Living”:

So prepare your minds for action and exercise self-control. Put all your hope in the gracious salvation that will come to you when Jesus Christ is revealed to the world.

Here is the King James Version:

Wherefore gird up the loins of your mind, be sober, and hope to the end for the grace that is to be brought unto you at the revelation of Jesus Christ;

Amplified Bible (AMP) also offers a powerful rendering of the verse:

13 So brace up your minds; be sober (circumspect, morally alert); set your hope wholly and unchangeably on the grace (divine favor) that is coming to you when Jesus Christ (the Messiah) is revealed.

Here is verse is graphically illustrated:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2ya8qMJE1Y

The whole idea of living soberly was also mentioned in the recent blog entry for January 3, where the Verse of the Day was taken from Titus 2:11-12 (KJV):

For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men, Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world;

The New Living Translation renders the passage thusly:

11 For the grace of God has been revealed, bringing salvation to all people. 12 And we are instructed to turn from godless living and sinful pleasures. We should live in this evil world with wisdom, righteousness, and devotion to God,

In addition to 1 Peter 1:13, 1 Peter 5:8 offers another reason for sobriety:

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion,
walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

One translation of the Greek word verb for “be sober” renders the term: “to be sober, calm and collected, to have good sense, good judgment, wisdom, and level-headed in times of stress.” Altogether, “be sober” is used eight times in the New Testament.

2 Corinthians 5:13

For whether we be beside ourselves, it is to God: or whether we be sober, it is for your cause.

This verse mentions that it doesn’t matter if we are “beside ourselves” or “mad” or “plum out of our minds” or if we are “sober” or “clothed in our right minds” or “of a sound mind”—it is all for the sake of the believers.

Notice that 1 Peter 1:13 also connects the idea of being sober with the hope of the Lord’s return and that is the context for two uses of the verb in 1 Thessalonians, whose focal point is the parousia or gathering together at the return of Christ. Note the exhortation to “be sober” in light of the Hope:

1 Thessalonians 5:6

Therefore let us not sleep, as do others; but let us watch and be sober.

1 Thessalonians 5:8

But let us, who are of the day, be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love; and for an helmet, the hope of salvation.

Listen to this upbeat contemporary cut of “1 Peter 5:8” from Allen Swoope’s album The Zoo, offering another reminder to “be sober.”

Be sober in light of the Hope

January 6, 2015

The Verse of the Day for January 6, 2015 comes from 1 Peter 1:13 (KJV):

Wherefore gird up the loins of your mind, be sober, and hope to the end for the grace that is to be brought unto you at the revelation of Jesus Christ;

Amplified Bible (AMP) also offers a powerful rendering of the verse:

13 So brace up your minds; be sober (circumspect, morally alert); set your hope wholly and unchangeably on the grace (divine favor) that is coming to you when Jesus Christ (the Messiah) is revealed.

Here the verse is graphically illustrated:

This particular verse was also mentioned in the blog entry for January 3, 2015 where the Verse of the Day was taken from Titus 2:11-12 (KJV):

For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men, Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world;

The New Living Translation renders the passage in this way:

11 For the grace of God has been revealed, bringing salvation to all people. 12 And we are instructed to turn from godless living and sinful pleasures. We should live in this evil world with wisdom, righteousness, and devotion to God,

In addition to 1 Peter 1:13, 1 Peter 5:8 offers another reason for sobriety:

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

One translation of the Greek word verb for “be sober” renders the term: “to be sober, calm and collected, to have good sense, good judgment, wisdom, and level-headed in times of stress.”

2 Corinthians 5:13

For whether we be beside ourselves, it is to God: or whether we be sober, it is for your cause.

This verse mentions that it doesn’t matter if we are “beside ourselves” or “mad” or “plum out of our minds” or if we are “sober” or “clothed in our right minds” or “of a sound mind”—it is all for the sake of the believers.

We notice that 1 Peter 1:13 connects the idea of being sober with the hope of the Lord’s return which is also the context for two uses of the verb in 1 Thessalonians, whose focal point is the parousia or gathering together at the return of Christ. Note the exhortation to “be sober” in light of the Hope:

1 Thessalonians 5:6

Therefore let us not sleep, as do others; but let us watch and be sober.

1 Thessalonians 5:8

But let us, who are of the day, be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love; and for an helmet, the hope of salvation.

Altogether, “be sober” is used eight times in the New Testament.

Listen to this upbeat contemporary cut of “1 Peter 5:8” from Allen Swoope’s album The Zoo, another reminder to “be sober.”

Be sober, be vigilant

September 9, 2014

Titus_2-2

We begin this day, September 9, 2014, with the Verse of the Day, which is found in Titus 2:2

That the aged men be sober, grave, temperate, sound in faith, in charity, in patience.

The expression “be sober” is used three times in Titus in relation to four categories of individuals: “older men, older women, young women, and young men:

Verse 3 is directed toward the older women who are instructed to teach the young women to be sober. Clearly, one cannot teach what one does not practice oneself.

Titus 2:4

That they (the aged women) may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,

Titus 2:6

Young men likewise exhort to be sober minded.

To be sober is a strong reminder to everyone, both old and young alike.

The expression is also used elsewhere in the New Testament:

1 Peter 1:13 (KJV):

Wherefore gird up the loins of your mind, be sober, and hope to the end for the grace that is to be brought unto you at the revelation of Jesus Christ;

Amplified Bible (AMP) also offers a powerful rendering of the verse:

So brace up your minds; be sober (circumspect, morally alert); set your hope wholly and unchangeably on the grace (divine favor) that is coming to you when Jesus Christ (the Messiah) is revealed.

In addition to 1 Peter 1:13, 1 Peter 5:8 offers another reason for sobriety:

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

The expression “be sober” is generally thought of in terms of “do not be drunk” or “don’t get intoxicated.” His graceoasis.com points out that “the word does not mean to abstain from the use of alcohol but rather to refrain from the abuse of it which leads to intoxication.”

Translated from the Greek word nepso, the verb means “to be sober-minded, watchful, and circumspect.” Variations of the verb include ananephō, translated to become sober; eknephō, meaning “to return to one’s sense from drunkenness, become sober” and nēphálios: sober.

One translation of the Greek word renders the term: “to be sober, calm and collected, to have good sense, good judgment, wisdom, and level-headed in times of stress.”

Altogether, “Be sober” is used eight times in the New Testament:

2 Corinthians 5:13

For whether we be beside ourselves, it is to God: or whether we be sober, it is for your cause.

This verse mentions that it doesn’t matter if we are “beside ourselves” or “mad” or “plum out of our minds” or if we are “sober” or “clothed in our right minds” or “of a sound mind”—it is all for the sake of the believers.

We notice that 1 Peter 1:13 connects the idea of being sober with the hope of the Lord’s return which is also the context for two uses of the verb in 1 Thessalonians, whose focal point is the parousia or gathering together at the return of Christ.

1 Thessalonians 5:6

Therefore let us not sleep, as do others; but let us watch and be sober.

1 Thessalonians 5:8

But let us, who are of the day, be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love; and for an helmet, the hope of salvation.

The Verse of the Day is but one of eight strong exhortations to “be sober.”

Listen to this upbeat contemporary cut of “1 Peter 5:8” from Allen Swoope’s The Zoo.

1 Peter 1:13: Be sober

January 6, 2014

1_Peter_1-13

We begin this day, January 6, 2014, with the Verse of the Day, which is found in 1 Peter 1:13

Wherefore gird up the loins of your mind, be sober, and hope to the end for the grace that is to be brought unto you at the revelation of Jesus Christ;

Amplified Bible (AMP) also offers a powerful rendering of the verse:

So brace up your minds; be sober (circumspect, morally alert); set your hope wholly and unchangeably on the grace (divine favor) that is coming to you when Jesus Christ (the Messiah) is revealed.

The expression “be sober” is generally thought of in terms of “do not be drunk” or “don’t get intoxicated.” Hisgraceoasis.com points out that “the word does not mean to abstain from the use of alcohol but rather to refrain from the abuse of it which leads to intoxication.”

Translated from the Greek word nepso, the verb means “to be sober-minded, watchful, and circumspect.” Variations of the verb include ananephō, translated to become sober; eknephō, meaning “to return to one’s sense from drunkenness, become sober” and nēphálios: sober. One translation of the Greek word renders the term: “to be sober, calm and collected, to have good sense, good judgment, wisdom, and level-headed in times of stress.”

“Be sober” is used eight times in the New Testament:

2 Corinthians 5:13

For whether we be beside ourselves, it is to God: or whether we be sober, it is for your cause.

This verse mentions that it doesn’t matter if we are “beside ourselves” or “mad” or “plum out of our minds” or if we are “sober” or “clothed in our right minds” or “of a sound mind”—it is all for the sake of the believers.

We notice that 1 Peter 1:13 connects the idea of being sober with the hope of the Lord’s return which is also the context for two uses of the verb in 1 Thessalonians, whose focal point is the parousia or gathering together at the return of Christ.

1 Thessalonians 5:6

Therefore let us not sleep, as do others; but let us watch and be sober.

1 Thessalonians 5:8

But let us, who are of the day, be sober, putting on the breastplate of faith and love; and for an helmet, the hope of salvation.

In addition to 1 Peter 1:13, 1 Peter 5:8 offers a reason for sobriety:

1 Peter 5:8

Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour:

Three references in Titus relate to four categories of individuals: “older men, older women, young women, and young men:

Titus 2:2

That the aged men be sober, grave, temperate, sound in faith, in charity, in patience.

Titus 2:4

That they (the aged women) may teach the young women to be sober, to love their husbands, to love their children,

Verse 3 is directed toward the older women who are instructed to teach the young women to be sober. Clearly, one cannot teach what one does not practice oneself.

Titus 2:6

Young men likewise exhort to be sober minded.

To be sober is a strong reminder to everyone, both old and young alike.

The Verse of the Day is but one of eight strong exhortations in the Bible to “be sober.”