Archive for the ‘Quote of the Day’ Category

Faith is a journey

April 24, 2017

Within the past several weeks, a number of Quotes of the Day as well as Verses of the Day have focused on faith. In addition, faith continues to be a topic of importance in that Bishop Charles Mellette of Christian Provision Ministries in Sanford, NC has been teaching a series related to faith. From the series a metaphor emerged which described “faith as a journey.”

In addition, I discussed a related quote “Faith is a journey; when you start, you can’t quit.” Bishop Mellette also make the following statements to corroborate this point:

“Faith is not an experience—Faith is a journey. . . Your faith is coming and growing,” as he also shared 2 Thessalonians 1:3:

We are bound to thank God always for you, brethren, as it is fitting, because your faith grows exceedingly, and the love of every one of you all abounds toward each other,

He also shared Romans 10:17:

17 So then faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.

He went on to say, “Your faith grows exceedingly—Faith is progressive . . . It involves a process. It is ongoing. God is not your previous experience. . . God is your new beginning, as we are living our faith every day.”

In a previous blog post on faith, I commented on the significance of faith in my life as a believer, as I recalled that my first Bible teaching shared at a Youth Night service at a church camp in high school centered on faith, as I explored Hebrews 11:1, and verse 6. More than 50 years later when I was required to write my personal testimony to share with students whom I taught at Indiana Wesleyan University, I entitled my sharing “My Journey of Faith”

One of Bishop Mellette’s teachings related specifically to “Faith as a journey” and inspired the following poem:

 On Our Journey . . . The Journey Continues

May we see clearly where our paths have led

And be strengthened for the journey ahead.

“Strengthened for the Journey”

 

“And now I cause you to begin even a new journey. . .

The journey has already begun.”

Apostle John Tetsola

 

We are steadfast– our souls remain anchored in hope,

Eagerly watching and waiting, looking above.

Feeling during dark times that we can barely cope,

But seasons swiftly change, for we have come to know

Nothing can ever separate us from God’s love.

Despite appearances, God has the last say so.

Once more we seek to serve, to go where we are sent

That our lives should reflect the praise of His glory,

The finishing touch on your crowning achievement:

The surprise happy ending of this love story

When all creation finally gets back to being one,

Even as with Father, Holy Spirit, and Son.

The perfect will of God unfolds for all to see,

As we begin each new day on our journey.

Recently while developing an online American Literature course for Carolina College of Biblical Studies, I incorporated the same metaphor: “Life is a journey of discovery,” as a theme revealed in a variety of literary works by American authors. Students also explore their personal feelings, thoughts, and reactions evoked from the various readings as they intersect with each individual’s quest to find his or her personal identity.

The course points out one of the universal concerns of humanity is the quest for identity. Every individual seeks to find out “Who am I?” “Why am I here?” “What is my purpose in life?” Life can be viewed as a “Journey of Faith,” the  quest to discover our true identity as believers in the Lord Jesus Christ.

In thinking about this concept, a meaningful song comes to mind to remind us to take joy in each phase of our ongoing journey of discovery.

Michael Card offers “Joy in the Journey”:

Did you hear. . . Are you listening?

April 12, 2017

Instead of the usual Verse of the Day, the blog entry for April 12, 2017 is another “Quote of the Day” which in this case is based on two questions: “Did you hear what I said? Are you listening to me?” These two questions also bring to mind a related verse found in James 1:22 (NKJV):

But be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves.

The same verse was the basis for a previous blog entry entitled “Hearing vs. Listening: The Art of Listening” which is revised and re-posted here:

James 1:22 also brought to mind a number of thoughts regarding the distinction between hearing and listening, as I thought of a discussion on “listening” in a public speaking class that I teach.

In discussing the communication process, we noted the difference between “hearing” and “listening.” Indeed, hearing and listening are not synonymous. According to Stephen Lucas, hearing is “the process by which sound waves are received on the ear; it is the sense by which sound is perceived.” We hear the ambient sounds that surround us without really paying any attention to the fan on the computer or the air conditioning or the ticking of the clock.

On the other hand, listening is the act of interpreting and evaluating what is being said; it is an active activity that involves receiving, deciphering, and perceiving a message with intent to respond. Hearing is passive, whereas listening should be active. Keith Davis comments, “Hearing is with the ears; listening is with the mind.”

In Chinese calligraphy, the character for “listen” consists of pictures of the ear, the eye, and the heart, illustrated in this way:

The discussion regarding hearing and listening also brought to mind that listening is an art that is perfected over time by conscious, consistent effort to improve. This is especially true in a spiritual context whereby believers must learn to listen to God. We find that God is always speaking; indeed, God is never not speaking. As we continually place our ears near to the lips of God, we develop our proficiency in listening to hear the Master’s voice, as we practice in order to perfect this art:

The Art of Listening

God has something to say to you,
God has something to say.
Listen, Listen, Pay close attention.
God has something to say.

Children’s Song

The Lord GOD has given Me
The tongue of the learned,
That I should know how to speak
A word in season to him who is weary.
He awakens Me morning by morning,
He awakens My ear
To hear as the learned.

The Lord GOD has opened My ear;
And I was not rebellious,
Nor did I turn away.

Isaiah 50:4-5

Listen, listen, children: hear with the inner ear.
Tune your ears to hear in the center of your heart.
I will whisper cherished secrets as you come near.
To listen intently and obey is an art,
Practiced and perfected day by day.
As you hide my Word in the center of your heart,
I perform and bring to pass each word that I say.
In my unfolding Kingdom, you too have a part,
For to walk in love is the more excellent way.
Partake of my promises and consume my Word.
As precious as life-giving water, hold it dear
And do my will, proving all things that you have heard.
Listen intently and obey: Perfect this art.
Listen, listen, children: hear with the inner ear.

Although I use this poem when I teach the section on listening in the oral communication classes that I teach, quite providentially, I wrote the poem years before I started teaching these classes. When when the poem was first read at a Bible study, someone pointed out that at the center of the piece is the word “heart” which encompasses hear, ear, and art, all of which reinforce the message, as illustrated in this way:

Without a doubt we must strive each day to become more proficient at developing the “art of listening.”

As we close, listen to the JumpStart3 contemporary Scripture Memory Song of James 1:22:

No disappointment in God

April 5, 2017

Romans 10--11

Instead of the usual Verse of the Day for March 5, 2017, we want to take a look at another Quote of the Day, based on the Faith:

“Faith and trust will never meet with disappointment.”

The statement reiterates the message of assurance found in Romans 9:33 (AMP):

As it is written and forever remains written, “Behold I am laying in Zion a Stone of stumbling and a Rock of offense; And he who believes in Him [whoever adheres to, trusts in, and relies on Him] will not be disappointed [in his expectations].”

Romans 10:11 (AMP) also reinforces the same promise:

For the Scripture says, “Whoever believes in Him [whoever adheres to, trusts in, and relies on Him] will not be disappointed [in his expectations].”

Here is an excerpt from a previous blog entry that examined the same subject of “disappointment”:

The word is “disappointment” is defined as “a feeling of dissatisfaction, the emotion felt when a strongly held anticipation is not fulfilled.” As we go about our daily lives, all of us have experienced disappointment to some degree. We must recognize, however, that disappointments occurred when situations have not turned out the way we thought they would. In actuality, our disappointments – every one of them – come from the “add-ons” we attach, those things God never promised but which we add to God’s promises. In every situation whereby we might feel disappointed, we need to focus on the Word of God, and be grateful for the promises that we have rather than dwelling on what we do not have, which ultimately leads to being disappointed:

2 Peter 1:4(NKJV) reminds of the vast reservoir of God’s pledges:

by which have been given to us exceedingly great and precious promises, that through these you may be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.

2 Corinthians 1:20 (NKJV):

For all the promises of God in Him are Yes, and in Him Amen, to the glory of God through us.

We must continually look to God and to those exceedingly great and precious promises in His Word. As we do this we recognize that God does not disappoint nor fail to fulfill His promises. No, He does not prevent hopes or expectations from being realized, which is how we define the verb to “disappoint.” One is said to be “disappointed” or sad or displeased because one’s own hopes or expectations have not been fulfilled.

We cannot hold onto any feelings of being disappointed!  In reality, feelings of disappointments consist of our hopes and expectations. Disappointments come when God does not come through at the time that we “expect” Him to nor in the way we “expect” Him to. Disappointment is the result of “failed expectations” on our part.

We must remember that there is no failure in God, for God is good. The very essence of God is goodness. Indeed, Jesus Christ said, “There is none good but the Father.” Because God is good, “. . . all things work together for the good, to them that love God, to them that are the called according to His purpose.” (Romans 8:28) So no matter how bad the situation may appear to be, it will work together for the good. When facing what appears to be disappointing aspects in life, we can look to the Word of God and find that those who trust in God will not be disappointed.

Proverbs 23:18 (AMP) further reminds us:

For surely there is a latter end [a future and a reward], and your hope and expectation shall not be cut off.

Jeremiah 29:11 (NKJV) also reminds us God’s concern for our future or “final outcome”:

For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope.

The Amplified Bible again expresses this truth this way:

For I know the thoughts and plans that I have for you, says the Lord, thoughts and plans for welfare and peace and not for evil, to give you hope in your final outcome.

Edith Lillian Young has found a simple way of countering disappointment simply by making a small change which can result in a big change in our attitude toward this particular “deadly emotion.”

Disappointment

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
Change one letter, then I see
That the thwarting of my purpose
Is God’s better choice for me.
His appointment must be a blessing,
though it may come in disguise,
for the end from the beginning
open to His wisdom lies.

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
Whose? The Lord, who loves me best,
Understands and knows me fully,
Who my faith and love would test;
For, like a loving earthly parent,
He rejoices when He knows
That His child accepts, unquestioned,
All that from His wisdom flows.

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
“No good thing will He withhold,”
From denials oft we gather
Treasures of His love untold,
Well He knows each broken purpose
Leads to fuller, deeper trust,
And the end of all His dealings
Proves our God is wise and just.

“Disappointment – His appointment,”
Lord, I take it, then, as such.
Like the clay in hands of potter,
Yielding wholly to Thy touch.
All my life’s plan is Thy molding,
Not one single choice be mine;
Let me answer, unrepining –
“Father, not my will, but Thine.”

Phil Keaggy offers a musical rendition of these same lyrics:

Faith and the presence of God

March 24, 2017

Psalm 91--1 new

In keeping with the recent series of the Quote of the Day, here is another quote related to faith for March 24, 2017:

“Wherever faith is, God’s presence is there.”

In reflecting on this statement, Psalm 91 came to mind, as to where believers desire to remain and ever abide:

Psalm 91 (NKJV)

Safety of Abiding in the Presence of God

He who dwells in the secret place of the Most High
shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty.
I will say of the Lord, “He is my refuge and my fortress;
My God, in Him I will trust.”

Surely He shall deliver you from the snare of the fowler
And from the perilous pestilence.
He shall cover you with His feathers,
And under His wings you shall take refuge;
His truth shall be your shield and buckler.
You shall not be afraid of the terror by night,
Nor of the arrow that flies by day,
Nor of the pestilence that walks in darkness,
Nor of the destruction that lays waste at noonday.

A thousand may fall at your side,
And ten thousand at your right hand;
But it shall not come near you.
Only with your eyes shall you look,
And see the reward of the wicked.

Because you have made the Lord, who is my refuge,
Even the Most High, your dwelling place,
10 No evil shall befall you,
Nor shall any plague come near your dwelling;
11 For He shall give His angels charge over you,
To keep you in all your ways.
12 In their hands they shall bear you up,
Lest you dash your foot against a stone.
13 You shall tread upon the lion and the cobra,
The young lion and the serpent you shall trample underfoot.

14 “Because he has set his love upon Me, therefore I will deliver him;
I will set him on high, because he has known My name.
15 He shall call upon Me, and I will answer him;
I will be with him in trouble;
I will deliver him and honor him.
16 With long life I will satisfy him,
And show him My salvation.”

Our desire to ever remain in the presence of God is also expressed this way:

To Abide in God’s Presence

You will show me the path of life;
In Your presence is fullness of joy;
At Your right hand are pleasures forevermore

Psalm 16:11

To abide in God’s presence is our utmost desire.

So moved by compassion, we marvel and admire

This passion to pursue the Lord, in whom we delight,

Bringing such joy and peace to comfort us through the night.

Our love for the Lord Jesus Christ burns as a fire.

Clothed in righteousness, garments of praise are our attire.

We seek to do God’s will and all that He may require.

We meditate on the Word of God both day and night

To abide God’s presence.

Touched by the Master’s hand, we are whole and entire.

We have learned to trust God who is our sole supplier.

Challenges confront those who seek to do what is right,

But beyond the dark is the golden edge of daylight.

The dawning of each new day reveals our desire

To abide in God’s presence.

Esther Mui offers this moving rendition of Psalm 91: My God, In Him I Will Trust:

Faith is a learned habit

March 22, 2017
Faith

Faith: We are encouraged to be established and built up in our faith.

Within the past week or two, a number of Quotes of the Day as well as Verses of the Day have focused on faith, including the Quote of the Day for March 22, 2017:

“Faith is a learned habit. Be sure to practice it.”

In reflecting on faith, my mind goes back to a previous entry which included the following comments and poem:

In reading, occasionally one may encounter a double entendre or a figure of speech whereby an expression can have two meanings. Such is the case with “Faith as a Habit,” meaning that a “habit” can be a behavioral pattern that is practiced repeatedly; “habit” can also refer to apparel or clothing that is worn, a garment or costume. As you read and reflect upon the poem and its accompanying scripture, what does “Faith as a Habit” mean and how does apply to you at this time?

Faith as a Habit

And all who have been united with Christ in baptism
And all who have been united with Christ in baptism
have put on Christ, like putting on new clothes.

Galatians 3:26

We put on faith as a habit, worn as a garment.
We walk by faith, constantly renewing our mind
With the Word, prospering wherever we are sent.
In serving, we ask to receive–we seek and find
That faithfulness always yields promises fulfilled,
For God is not a man that He should ever lie.
We pray the prayer of faith–with his stripes we are healed,
Being assured that every need God will supply.
Praying in the Spirit or with words we understand,
Crafting prayers to petition or express our praise,
We submit our will and embrace what He has planned,
Mindful of His goodness, as we consider our ways.
We long to listen to hear that we might obey
And trust His heart and act in faith each time we pray.

The opening phrase of the last line of the poem brought to mind a song that has come to mean a great deal, particularly of late, when more than ever we are continuing to learn to “Trust His Heart.” This video provides the lyrics to this most meaningful song:

Without faith it is impossible. . .

March 15, 2017

Recently several Quotes of the Day as well as Verses of the Day have focused on faith, including this Quote of the Day for March 15, 2017:

“There are no ifs,  ands, or buts if you have faith.”

Faith has been topic of continuing importance, in that Bishop Charles Mellette of Christian Provision Ministries in Sanford, NC has been teaching a series related to faith. This past Sunday’s message “Faith that pleases God” emphasized Hebrews 11:1 and verse 6 among other scriptures. Yesterday I participated in an engaging panel discussion regarding the most recent teaching on faith.

In reflecting on our dialog regarding faith, my mind goes back to a Wednesday Youth Night at Camp Gray, a Presbyterian camp in Saugatuck, MI in the mid-1950s. When the request came forth for a young person to deliver a short inspirational message, I volunteered. As a rising sophomore in high school, back in the day, I put together my first Bible teaching, choosing the topic of “faith.” Using the Bible and study material of one of the camp counselors who was a seminary student, I focused on the two verses from Hebrews that have contributed immeasurably to the foundation of faith upon which I have built my life:

Hebrews 11: 1, 6 (Amplified Bible):

“NOW FAITH is the assurance (the confirmation, the title deed) of the things [we] hope for, being the proof of things [we] do not see and the conviction of their reality [faith perceiving as real fact what is not revealed to the senses].”

“But without faith it is impossible to please and be satisfactory to Him. For whoever would come near to God must [necessarily] believe that God exists and that He is the rewarder of those who earnestly and diligently seek Him [out].”

In the course of our dialog last night I shared from a previous blog post on the same subject:

. . . Faith, then can be said to be a kind of sine qua non, an indispensable condition, element, or factor; an essential ingredient. This verse reminds believers that faith is essential to building and maintaining a solid relationship with God, for without it is impossible to please God.

Hebrews 11, known as the Hall of Heroes of the Faith, introduces an array of individuals who accomplished great spiritual exploits as they walked by faith. Likewise, as we progress in our walk of faith, we learn that faith must be the firm foundation upon which we build. As followers of the Lord Jesus Christ, we grow and develop, as we discover that faith is the bedrock of our lives. We define faith as confident assurance, trust and conviction that we will prevail. Faith–“the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen”– operates beyond what we see, for we walk by faith, not by sight.

In the midst of thundering echoes of “No!” faith says “Yes!” Voices shout “You can’t!” but faith proclaims “We can, and we will!” At the point of total exhaustion, faith says, “Take one more step.” After more failed attempts than we can number, faith gives us courage to try one more time. Faith is tenacious—you hold on and never give up. Although the diagnosis, bank statement or other evidence says “No way!” faith responds with “God will make a way.”

In terms of illustrations of faith, we find excellent examples from the Bible and from the lives of great men and women who achieved impossible dreams. Despite a barrage of reasons as to why they would fail, they transformed failure into success. Without faith it is impossible . . . but with faith, the impossible becomes possible. We recognize and rejoice, knowing that “with God all things are possible.” Indeed, faith is our solid foundation. Like the wise man who built his house on the rock, when the storms of life approach, if we have laid a firm foundation, the house that we build will stand, for faith is our sure foundation.

Listen to this lively musical rendering of these two foundational verses that define our faith: Hebrews 11:1, 6:

Abraham: Strong faith in God

March 3, 2017

romans-4-20

Instead of the usual Verse of the Day, here is commentary on The Quote of the Day for March 3, 2017:

“Having strong faith in God strengthens believers and encourages them not to quit.”

My mind immediately turned to Psalm 27 which begins with these words:

Psalm 27:1 (NKJV):

The Lord is my light and my salvation. Whom shall I fear? The Lord is the strength of my life. Of whom shall I be afraid?

The Psalmist concludes with these words of encouragement:

Psalm 27:14 (NKJV):

Wait on the Lord. Be of good courage, and He shall strengthen your heart; wait I say on the Lord!

The passage of scripture associated with the Quote of the Day relates to Abraham, called the ‘’Father of Faith” and comes from Romans 4:19-21 (AMP):

19 Without becoming weak in faith he considered his own body, now as good as dead [for producing children] since he was about a hundred years old, and [he considered] the deadness of Sarah’s womb. 20 But he did not doubt or waver in unbelief concerning the promise of God, but he grew strong and empowered by faith, giving glory to God, 21 being fully convinced that God had the power to do what He had promised.

When confronted with what seemed to be an impossible situation, Abraham did not stagger at the promise of God that he would father an heir of many nations, even though he was “about a hundred years old” and his wife, Sarah, was “well past child-bearing” age. Despite the negative circumstances, Abraham was positive and resolute in believing that God would fulfill His promise. In the same way, we must continue to be steadfast in our faith and never quit trusting in God.

The lines of the familiar poem tell us over and over: “Don’t Quit!” Here is a video adaptation:

We are also encouraged by the lyrics, especially the last stanza, telling us: Be steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord (I Corinthians 15:58):

Chorus:

Be steadfast, unmovable,

Always abounding in the work of the Lord.

For as much as you that

Your labor’s not in vain in the Lord.

 

Don’t be discouraged

When mountains block your way.

In times of doubt

He’ll bring you out.

Stand fast, watch and pray.

Repeat Chorus:

 

When problems press you,

Your back’s against the wall,

Cast fear aside.

God’s on your side.

Keep on standing tall.

Repeat Chorus:

 

In the darkest night

God will give you a song.

Never give up.

He’ll fill your cup.

Trust God and be strong.

Repeat Chorus:

We close as Alison Southall sings of “Abraham’s Faith,” so described in Romans 4:17-19.

Order my steps in Your word

January 28, 2017

psalm-37-23-2

Similar to yesterday’s blog entry, today’s post is based on the Quote of the Day for January 28, 2017:

“We must learn to order our lives by the Word of the Lord.”

Although believers too often seek to take charge of their own lives and direct their own steps, Jeremiah 10:23 reminds us:

23 O Lord, I know the way of man is not in himself;
it is not in man who walks to direct his own steps.

The New Living Translation puts it this way:

I know, Lord, that our lives are not our own.
We are not able to plan our own course.

In contrast, the Psalmist declares, “The steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord, And He delights in his way.” (Psalm 37:23 (NLT)

I recall that one of the first scriptures that I committed to memory comes from Proverbs 3:5-6 (KJV):

Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding.

In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths.

Proverbs 20:24 (AMP) goes on to say:

Man’s steps are ordered and ordained by the Lord. How then can a man [fully] understand his way?

Despite our earnest intentions and best efforts to follow our own blueprints that we have designed for our lives, we find ourselves in perplexing, painfully distressing situations where we have absolutely no desire to be.

During such times, we ask ourselves, “Why am I here?  How did I get here? God, what are you doing? What are you trying to teach me?”  We recognize that God does everything on purpose (Ecclesiastes 3:1; Romans 8:28). Pastor Rick Warren provided a teaching series entitled “God’s Purpose behind Your Problems.” He mentioned that God is directly involved in every situation of our lives, and He is endeavoring to do one or more of a combination of five things: “Direct you; Inspect you; Correct you; Protect you; Perfect you.”

I took those five verbs and put them into a request, a petition, a personal prayer to God. God becomes the initiator of the action, and I become the object of his action.  In developing my own teaching series, I examine each of the verbs with examples from the Old Testament and New Testament, as I offer my “Five-Fold Prayer: Direct Me—Inspect Me—Correct Me—Protect Me—Perfect Me.”  I close each teaching with a prayer/psalm inspired by each verb.  Here is the first of the series: “A Five-Fold Prayer: Direct Me”:

Generally speaking, “Direct” means to lead or to guide straight, as toward an object. In the Old Testament the verb is used in this sense: to lead, guide gently, softly and with care, as a shepherd guides his flock; to lead or to guide; most frequently of God who leads men.

Two verses from the New Testament are part of benedictions that close out Thessalonians:

I Thessalonians 3:11:

Now God himself and our Father, and our Lord Jesus Christ, direct our way unto you.

2 Thessalonians 3:5:

And the Lord direct your hearts into the love of God, and into the patient waiting for Christ.

The Quote of the Day is personalized with this psalm rendered as a prayer:

Direct me

Prepare the way, straighten my path, order my steps,

Shine your light upon me that I may not stumble,

That I may not walk in the light of my own sparks,

But illumine my way with the lamp of your Word.

Lord, direct my heart into the love of God

And into the patient waiting for Jesus Christ.

Raise me up in righteousness and direct all my ways.

We conclude today’s post with one of my all-time favorite gospel songs related to this desire for God to guide and direct us: “Order My Steps in Your Word”:

Broken and fulfilled promises

January 27, 2017

2-corinthians1-20

Today’s post centers on the “Quote of the Day” for January 27, 2017 which offers this enlightening statement:

”Problems are not meant to destroy you; they are just the “in-between” before the Provision.”

I recall a teaching a number of years ago that pointed out that problems are actually situated as the intermediary phase between “the Promises of God” and His ultimate Provision: Promises—Problems—Provision.

Earlier this week, we posted comments regarding the word “disappointment,” defined as “feelings of dissatisfaction, the emotion felt when a strongly held anticipation is not fulfilled.” We must recognize, however, that disappointments occurred when situations have not turned out the way we thought they would nor at the time that we would. Since that time, I have come across a scientific word to describe some of the negative emotions associated with broken promises. When an individual fails to live up to the high expectations of another person to whom promises have been made, psychologists use the term “negative expectancy disconfirmation.”

In contrast, the Word of God reveals that God has provided His people with “exceedingly great and precious promises” We are also reminded that “all the promises of God in Christ are Yes, and in Christ, Amen to the glory of God.” A previous blog post reiterated this point:

We must remember that there is no failure in God, for God is good. The very essence of God is goodness. Indeed, Jesus Christ said, “There is none good but the Father.” Because God is good, “. . . all things work together for the good, to them that love God, to them that are the called according to His purpose.” (Romans 8:28) So no matter how bad the situation may appear to be, it will work together for the good. When facing what appears to be disappointing aspects in life, we can look to the Word of God and find that those who trust in God will not be disappointed.

The Psalmist also reminds us that God will not let those who trust Him to be disappointed

Psalm 22:5 (AMP):

They cried to You and were delivered; they trusted in, leaned on, and confidently relied on You, and were not ashamed or confounded or disappointed.

Paul reiterates this point:

Romans 10:11(AMP):

The Scripture says, No man who believes in Him [who adheres to, relies on, and trusts in Him] will [ever] be put to shame or be disappointed. AMP

Above all, we must remember this:

Numbers 23:19 (KJV):

God is not a man, that he should lie; neither the son of man, that he should repent: hath he said, and shall he not do it? or hath he spoken, and shall he not make it good?

In our relationships with others we may encounter countless broken promises, resulting in in “negative expectancy disconfirmation” whereas in our relationship with our heavenly Father we receive boundless promises fulfilled, yielding “positive expectancy confirmation.” As believers our souls are anchored in hope, which has been defined as “expectation of a future good,” which is confirmed in Titus 1:2:

In hope of eternal life which God, who cannot lie, promised before time began

We conclude with Chris Tomlin who sums it all up with “Yes and Amen”:

Restore that person gently

January 24, 2017

Galatians 6--1-2

The Verse of the Day for January 24, 2017 directs our attention to Galatians 6:1, to which we also add verse 2 to complete the thought:

Galatians 6:1-2 (NIV):

[Doing Good to All] Brothers and sisters, if someone is caught in a sin, you who live by the Spirit should restore that person gently. But watch yourselves, or you also may be tempted. Carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ.

These verses express that when we see a brother or sister fall under a heavy burden of sin, we can spiritually come along side of that person and offer assistance in bearing that burden. We are to “restore that person gently.” This reference brings to mind a Quote of the Day blog entry posted last year:

“God is in the restoration business. He delights in transforming lives through the healing touch of the Lord Jesus Christ, who redeemers and restores and makes whole every wounded soul who calls out for help.”

Not only is God concerned about restoration, but we should also make restoration our business. As we endeavor to restore our brothers and sisters, we recognize that restoration is a process that should be engaged with a “spirit of gentleness, not with a sense of superiority or self-righteousness,” so states the Amplified Bible.

The verb “restore” in the Greek New Testament refers to a dislocated limb. In light of that, restoring the limb to its proper position must be done gently. We must keep this in mind as we endeavor to “restore” one another. During this time of restoration and recovery, we make our brothers and sisters aware of God’s desire that they be restored, as expressed in these lyrics:

Rest in me and recover.

Your strength and courage I will renew.

As you trust me you will uncover

The power of Christ at work within you.

I am all that you need.

 

Rest in me and you will discover

I am the Lord, and I do not faint.

Be assured I never get weary.

Rest in me and be comforted to know

I am all that you need.

 

Rest in me and mount up as eagles.

You shall walk and shall not faint.

You shall run and not be weary.

Rest in me and know that I shall not fail.

I am all that you need.

 

I am all that you need in the time of famine.

I am the one that shall feed and satisfy your soul.

I am all that you need in the time of trouble.

I will hasten to be by your side. Now, don’t you see?

I am all that you need.

The Verse of the Day and its reference to the previous Quote of the Day also bring to mind this powerful song restoration by Kevin Levar, “I Will Restore” the perfect way to cap off today’s entry: