Simeon’s song and our new song

In the blog entry for December 26, 2018, we encounter an illustration of God’s perfect timing in an occurrence taking place eight days after the birth of Jesus Christ, as recorded at the end of chapter 2 of the Gospel of Luke. Here we find a remarkable man who comes into the Temple in Jerusalem at the same time as Mary and Joseph, who are bringing the newly born Christ-child to be circumcised, according to customs described in Luke 2:22-24 (AMP):

22 And when the time for their purification came [that is, the mother’s purification and the baby’s dedication] according to the Law of Moses, they brought Him up to Jerusalem to present Him to the Lord [set apart as the Firstborn] 23 (as it is written in the Law of the Lord, “Every firstborn male that opens the womb shall be called holy [set apart and dedicated] to the Lord)” 24 and [they came also] to offer a sacrifice according to what is said in the Law of the Lord [to be appropriate for a family of modest means], “a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons.”

The passage goes on to relate more information regarding Simeon, who offers a magnificent prophetic declaration in response to what he has seen:

Luke 2:25-32 (AMP):

25 Now there was a man in Jerusalem whose name was Simeon; and this man was righteous and devout [carefully observing the divine Law], and looking for the Consolation of Israel; and the Holy Spirit was upon him. 26 It had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not die before he had seen the Lord’s Christ (the Messiah, the Anointed). 27 Prompted by the Spirit, he came into the temple [enclosure]; and when the parents brought in the child Jesus, to do for Him the custom required by the Law, 28 Simeon took Him into his arms, and blessed and praised and thanked God, and said,
29
“Now, Lord, You are releasing Your bond-servant to leave [this world] in peace,
According to Your word;
30
For my eyes have seen Your Salvation,
31
Which You have prepared in the presence of all peoples,
32

A Light for revelation to the Gentiles [to disclose what was previously unknown],

Sometimes referred to as “Nunc Dimittis,” translated from the Latin phrase meaning “you can now dismiss,” Simeon’s psalm of praise has been set to music by Michael Card and other composers. Indeed, Simeon was a witness to the Salvation of the all nations revealed in Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God. This amazing bond-servant of the Lord received personal assurance that he would not die until he had seen this promise fulfilled in “the Lord’s Messiah, Lord’s Christ (the Messiah, the Anointed).” Being led by the Spirit of God, Simeon was in the right place at right time, and he sang his “swan song” before he departed from this life.

In a similar manner, our heart’s desire is to witness the Return of Jesus Christ in the same way that those who witnessed his life on earth, his death, burial and resurrection. We who are alive and remain will also see the Lord return in same way that believers saw him ascend to his Father.

Thinking of Simeon’s song also inspired this new song:

Our Rendezvous with Destiny

As Simeon sang, so our new song resounds in beauty:

The return of Christ–our rendezvous with destiny.

The Daystar shall arise, even as we watch and wait.

Though circumstances may hinder, we shall not be late,

But we shall behold the unfolding of this mystery.

 

Past, present and future all merge in eternity

Before the Lamb of God, in all of His glory,

Transformed into this transcendent and perfected state:

Our rendezvous with destiny.

 

In the new heaven and earth where we find no more sea,

Where we shall all know the fullness of God’s sovereignty

And shall receive our reward, our heavenly estate.

But until then we fill our lamps with oil and await

As the Savior shall descend to gather you and me

When we shall savor God’s love for all eternity:

Our rendezvous with destiny.

Sandi Patti reminds us of the glorious day of Christ’s Return when “We Shall Behold Him”:

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